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NFL COACHES HOT SEAT RANKING

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 19, 2017 – Gene Roddenberry

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 19, 2017 – Gene Roddenberry

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“These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five year mission … to boldly go where no man has gone before.”

And

“A man either lives life as it happens to him, meets it head-on and licks it, or he turns his back on it and starts to wither away.”

And

“If man is to survive, he will have learned to take a delight in the essential differences between men and between cultures. He will learn that differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life’s exciting variety, not something to fear.”

And

“It isn’t all over; everything has not been invented; the human adventure is just beginning.”

And

“Reality is incredibly larger, infinitely more exciting, than the flesh and blood vehicle we travel in here. If you read science fiction, the more you read it the more you realize that you and the universe are part of the same thing. Science knows still practically nothing about the real nature of matter, energy, dimension, or time; and even less about those remarkable things called life and thought. But whatever the meaning and purpose of this universe, you are a legitimate part of it. And since you are part of the all that is, part of its purpose, there is more to you than just this brief speck of existence. You are just a visitor here in this time and this place, a traveler through it.”

And

“I believe in humanity. We are an incredible species. We’re still just a child creature, we’re still being nasty to each other. And all children go through those phases. We’re growing up, we’re moving into adolescence now. When we grow up — man, we’re going to be something!”

And

“It speaks to some basic human needs, that there is a tomorrow — it’s not all going to be over in a big flash and a bomb, that the human race is improving, that we have things to be proud of as humans. No, ancient astronauts did not build the pyramids — human beings built them because they’re clever and they work hard. And Star Trek is about those things.”

And

“Time is the fire in which we burn.”

And

“Star Trek speaks to some basic human needs: that there is a tomorrow — it’s not all going to be over with a big flash and a bomb; that the human race is improving; that we have things to be proud of as humans. No, ancient astronauts did not build the pyramids — human beings built them, because they’re clever and they work hard. And Star Trek is about those things.”

And

“The strength of a civilization is not measured by its ability to fight wars, but rather by its ability to prevent them.”

And

“It is the struggle itself that is most important. We must strive to be more than we are. It does not matter that we will not reach our ultimate goal. The effort itself yields its own reward.”

And

“If man is to survive, he will have learned to take a delight in the essential differences between men and between cultures. He will learn that differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life’s exciting variety, not something to fear.”

And

“Ancient astronauts didn’t build the pyramids. Human beings built the pyramids, because they’re clever and they work hard.”

And

“PICARD: There is no greater challenge than the study of philosophy.
WESLEY: But William James won’t be in my Starfleet exams.
PICARD: The important things never will be. Anyone can be trained in the mechanics of piloting a starship.
WESLEY: But Starfleet Academy
PICARD: It takes more. Open your mind to the past. Art, history, philosophy. And all this may mean something.”

And

“The glory of creation is in its infinite diversity.”

And

“Space… the Final Frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.”

Wikipedia:  Gene Roddenberry

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 18, 2017 – Albert Camus

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 18, 2017 – Albert Camus

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“Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.”

And

“Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear.”

And

“The evil that is in the world almost always comes of ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

And

“But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”

And

“Without culture, and the relative freedom it implies, society, even when perfect, is but a jungle. This is why any authentic creation is a gift to the future.”

And

“All great deeds and all great thoughts have a ridiculous beginning. Great works are often born on a street corner or in a restaurant’s revolving door.”

And

“Truth is mysterious, elusive, always to be conquered. Liberty is dangerous, as hard to live with as it is elating. We must march toward these two goals, painfully but resolutely, certain in advance of our failings on so long a road.”

And

“The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.”

And

“The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

And

“Those who lack the courage will always find a philosophy to justify it.”

And

“Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.”

And

“No cause justifies the deaths of innocent people.”

And

“Basically, at the very bottom of life, which seduces us all, there is only absurdity, and more absurdity. And maybe that’s what gives us our joy for living, because the only thing that can defeat absurdity is lucidity.”

And

“For if there is a sin against life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life.”

And

“You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.”

And

“Peace is the only battle worth waging.”

And

“There are causes worth dying for, but none worth killing for.”

And

“I know that man is capable of great deeds. But if he isn’t capable of great emotion, well, he leaves me cold.”

And

“The need to be right — the sign of a vulgar mind.”

And

“Seeking what is true is not seeking what is desirable.”

And

“People hasten to judge in order not to be judged themselves.”

And

“I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn’t, than live my life as if there isn’t and die to find out there is.”

And

“Life can be magnificent and overwhelming — that is the whole tragedy. Without beauty, love, or danger it would almost be easy to live. ”

And

“At the heart of all beauty lies something inhuman.”

And

“The evil that is in the world almost always comes from ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

And

“Freedom is nothing but a chance to be better.”

And

“There are crimes of passion and crimes of logic. The boundary between them is not clearly defined.”

And

“Where there is no hope, it is incumbent on us to invent it.”

And

“I rebel; therefore I exist.”

And

“Real generosity towards the future lies in giving all to the present.”

And

“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.”

And

“Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time.”

And

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer. And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger — something better, pushing right back.”

And

“There is scarcely any passion without struggle.”

And

“Should I kill myself, or have a cup of coffee?”

And

“But in the end one needs more courage to live than to kill himself.”

And

“Always go too far, because that’s where you’ll find the truth.”

And

“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.”

And

“The truth is that everyone is bored, and devotes himself to cultivating habits.”

And

“He who despairs of the human condition is a coward, but he who has hope for it is a fool.”

And

“The habit of despair is worse than despair itself.”

And

“But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”

And

“My chief occupation, despite appearances, has always been love.”

And

“If absolute truth belongs to anyone in this world, it certainly does not belong to the man or party that claims to possess it.”

Wikipedia:  Albert Camus

Is it worth the trouble, Ralph Ammer, Medium.com

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, October 17, 2017 – Niccolo Machiavelli

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, October 17, 2017 – Niccolo Machiavelli

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“Never was anything great achieved without danger.”

And

“The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him.”

And

“The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.”

And

“There are three kinds of intelligence: one kind understands things for itself, the other appreciates what others can understand, the third understands neither for itself nor through others. This first kind is excellent, the second good, and the third kind useless.”

And

“There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.”

And

“Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.”

And

“The Romans never allowed a trouble spot to remain simply to avoid going to war over it, because they knew that wars don’t just go away, they are only postponed to someone else’s advantage.”

And

“Where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be great.”

And

“Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.”

And

“The chief foundations of all states, new as well as old or composite, are good laws and good arms; and as there cannot be good laws where the state is not well armed, it follows that where they are well armed they have good laws.”

And

“From this arises the question whether it is better to be loved rather than feared, or feared rather than loved. It might perhaps be answered that we should wish to be both: but since love and fear can hardly exist together, if we must choose between them, it is far safer to be feared than loved.”

And

“God is not willing to do everything, and thus take away our free will and that share of glory which belongs to us.”

And

“It is truly a marvelous thing to consider to what greatness Athens arrived in the space of one hundred years after she freed herself from the tyranny of Pisistratus; but, above all, it is even more marvelous to consider the greatness Rome reached when she freed herself from her kings. The reason is easy to understand, for it is the common good and not private gain that makes cities great. Yet, without a doubt, this common good is observed only in republics, for in them everything that promotes it is practised, and however much damage it does to this or that private individual, those who benefit from the said common good are so numerous that they are able to advance in spite of the inclination of the few citizens who are oppressed by it.”

And

“It is not titles that make men illustrious, but men who make titles illustrious.”

And

“Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.”

And

“The Romans never allowed a trouble spot to remain simply to avoid going to war over it, because they knew that wars don’t just go away, they are only postponed to someone else’s advantage. Therefore, they made war with Philip and Antiochus in Greece, in order not to have to fight them in Italy… They never went by that saying which you constantly hear from the wiseacres of our day, that time heals all things. They trusted rather their own character and prudence— knowing perfectly well that time contains the seeds of all things, good as well as bad.”

And

“It ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new. This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them.”

And

“The prince must consider, as has been in part said before, how to avoid those things which will make him hated or contemptible; and as often as he shall have succeeded he will have fulfilled his part, and he need not fear any danger in other reproaches. It makes him hated above all things, as I have said, to be rapacious, and to be a violator of the property and women of his subjects, from both of which he must abstain. And when neither their property nor honour is touched, the majority of men live content, and he has only to contend with the ambition of a few, whom he can curb with ease in many ways. It makes him contemptible to be considered fickle, frivolous, effeminate, mean-spirited, irresolute, from all of which a prince should guard himself as from a rock; and he should endeavour to show in his actions greatness, courage, gravity, and fortitude; and in his private dealings with his subjects let him show that his judgments are irrevocable, and maintain himself in such reputation that no one can hope either to deceive him or to get round him. That prince is highly esteemed who conveys this impression of himself, and he who is highly esteemed is not easily conspired against; for, provided it is well known that he is an excellent man and revered by his people, he can only be attacked with difficulty.”

And

“The best fortress which a prince can possess is the affection of his people.”

And

“There is no other way of guarding oneself against flattery than by letting men understand that they will not offend you by speaking the truth; but when everyone can tell you the truth, you lose their respect.”

And

“It was the verdict of ancient writers that men afflict themselves in evil and weary themselves in the good, and that the same effects result from both of these passions. For whenever men are not obliged to fight from necessity, they fight from ambition; which is so powerful in human breasts, that it never leaves them no matter to what rank they rise. The reason is that nature has so created men that they are able to desire everything but are not able to attain everything: so that the desire being always greater than the acquisition, there results discontent with the possession and little satisfaction to themselves from it. From this arises the changes in their fortunes; for as men desire, some to have more, some in fear of losing their acquisition, there ensues enmity and war, from which results the ruin of that province and the elevation of another.”

And

“It is truly a marvelous thing to consider to what greatness Athens arrived in the space of one hundred years after she freed herself from the tyranny of Pisistratus; but, above all, it is even more marvelous to consider the greatness Rome reached when she freed herself from her kings. The reason is easy to understand, for it is the common good and not private gain that makes cities great. Yet, without a doubt, this common good is observed only in republics, for in them everything that promotes it is practised, and however much damage it does to this or that private individual, those who benefit from the said common good are so numerous that they are able to advance in spite of the inclination of the few citizens who are oppressed by it.”

And

“No proceeding is better than that which you have concealed from the enemy until the time you have executed it. To know how to recognize an opportunity in war, and take it, benefits you more than anything else. Nature creates few men brave, industry and training makes many. Discipline in war counts more than fury.”

Wikipedia: Niccolo Machiavelli

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Monday, October 16, 2017 – Harper Lee

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Monday, October 16, 2017 – Harper Lee

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Below – To Kill A Mockingbird Quotes

“I think there’s just one kind of folks. Folks.”

And

“Many receive advice, only the wise profit from it.”

And

“The book to read is not the one which thinks for you, but the one which makes you think. No book in the world equals the Bible for that.”

And

“They’re certainly entitled to think that, and they’re entitled to full respect for their opinions… but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.”

And

“First of all,” he said, “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view–until you climb into his skin and walk around it.”

And

“Atticus said to Jem one day, “I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. “Your father’s right,” she said. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing except make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corn cribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

And

“With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable.”

And

“When a child asks you something, answer him, for goodness sake. But don’t make a production of it. Children are children, but they can spot an evasion faster than adults, and evasion simply muddles ’em.”

And

“Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

And

“You just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don’t you let ’em get your goat. Try fightin’ with your head for a change.”

And

“There is one way in this country in which all men are created equal—there is one human institution that makes a pauper the equal of a Rockefeller, the stupid man the equal of an Einstein, and the ignorant man the equal of any college president. That institution, gentlemen, is the court.”

And

“We’re paying the highest tribute you can pay a man. We trust him to do right. It’s that simple.”

And

“There are just some kind of men…who’re so busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one.”

And

“Ladies in bunches always filled me with vague apprehension and a firm desire to be elsewhere.”

And

People in their right minds never take pride in their talents.

And

Atticus had said it was the polite thing to talk to people about what they were interested in, not about what you were interested in.

And

“Try fighting with your head for a change…it’s a good one, even if it does resist learning.”

And

“I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.  It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.  You rarely win, but sometimes you do.”  

Above – To Kill A Mockingbird Quotes

“Well, they’re Southern people, and if they know you are working at home they think nothing of walking right in for coffee. But they wouldn’t dream of interrupting you at golf. ” Harper Lee

And

“Any writer worth his salt writes to please himself…It’s a self-exploratory operation that is endless. An exorcism of not necessarily his demon, but of his divine discontent.” Harper Lee

Wikipedia Page:  Harper Lee

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 15, 2017 – F. Scott Fitzgerald

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 15, 2017 – F. Scott Fitzgerald

“A big man has no time really to do anything but just sit and be big.”

And

“Action is character.”

And

“Advertising is a racket, like the movies and the brokerage business. You cannot be honest without admitting that its constructive contribution to humanity is exactly minus zero.”

And

“An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmaster of ever afterwards.”

And

“Either you think, or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.”

And

“Every one suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues.”

And

“First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.”

And

“Genius is the ability to put into effect what is on your mind.”

And

“I like people and I like them to like me, but I wear my heart where God put it, on the inside.”

And

“Life is essentially a cheat and its conditions are those of defeat; the redeeming things are not happiness and pleasure but the deeper satisfactions that come out of struggle.”

And

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

And

“Scratch a Yale man with both hands and you’ll be lucky to find a coast-guard. Usually you find nothing at all.”

And

“Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy.”

And

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“You don’t write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.”

And

“Once one is caught up into the material world not one person in ten thousand finds the time to form literary taste, to examine the validity of philosophic concepts for himself, or to form what, for lack of a better phrase, I might call the wise and tragic sense of life.”

Amd

“Isn’t Hollywood a dump — in the human sense of the word. A hideous town, pointed up by the insulting gardens of its rich, full of the human spirit at a new low of debasement.”

And

“Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft, where we are hard, cynical where we are trustful, in a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to understand.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“Before I go on with this short history, let me make a general observation – the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise. This philosophy fitted on to my early adult life, when I saw the improbable, the implausible, often the “impossible,” come true.”

And

“All good writing is swimming under water and holding your breath.

And

“My generation of radicals and breakers-down never found anything to take the place of the old virtues of work and courage and the old graces of courtesy and politeness.”

And

“Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy.”

And

“On the last night, with my trunk packed and my car sold to the grocer, I went over and looked at that huge incoherent failure of a house once more. On the white steps an obscene word, scrawled by some boy with a piece of brick, stood out clearly in the moonlight, and I erased it, drawing my shoe raspingly along the stone. Then I wandered down to the beach and sprawled out on the sand.

Most of the big shore places were closed now and there were hardly any lights except the shadowy, moving glow of a ferryboat across the Sound. And as the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes—a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” The Ending of The Great Gatsby, 1925

Wikipedia:  F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Saturday, October 14, 2017 – Chester William Nimitz

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Saturday, October 14, 2017 – Chester William Nimitz

“I do believe we are going to have a major war, with Japan and Germany, and that the war is going to start by a very serious surprise attack and defeat of U.S. armed forces, and that there is going to be a major revulsion on the part of the political power in Washington against all those in command at sea, and they are going to be thrown out, though it won’t be their fault necessarily. And I wish to be in a position of sufficient prominence so that I will then be considered as one to be sent to sea, because that appears to be the route.” 

And

“A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder.”

And

“Through the skill and devotion to duty of their armed forces of all branches in the Midway area our citizens can now rejoice that a momentous victory is in the making.”
After the Battle of Midway, CINCPAC Communiqué No. 3, June 6, 1942

And

“Is the proposed operation likely to succeed?
What might be the consequences of failure?
Is it in the realm of practicability in terms of material and supplies?”
“Three favorite rules of thumb” Nimitz had printed on a card he kept on his desk

And

“They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side…To them, we have a solemn obligation — the obligation to ensure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live.” Of those who died in the war in the Pacific, after ceremonies in Tokyo Bay accepting the official surrender of Japan, September 2, 1945

And

“The U.S.’s major strength factor and weapon is its economy. If you cripple it, you cripple the military.” 

And

“That is not to say that we can relax our readiness to defend ourselves. Our armament must be adequate to the needs, but our faith is not primarily in these machines of defense but in ourselves.” 

And

“God grant me the courage not to give up what I think is right even though I think it is hopeless.”

And

“Sir Walter Raleigh declared in the early 17th century that “whoever commands the sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade of the world commands the riches of the world, and consequently the world itself.” This principle is as true today as when uttered, and its effect will continue as long as ships traverse the seas.” Employment of Naval Forces, 1948

And

“The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy’s capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor’s will.”

And

“The qualities of the Nimitz character were apparent in his face, in his career, and in his heritage; combined these factors made him precisely the man he was and placed him in this particular situation at this moment in history. … He was not a cold man, or a bad tempered man — quite the contrary — to the world he presented a figure of almost total complacency; he seldom lost his temper or raised his voice. … It could be said that King was a driver who knew how to lead; it could also be said that Nimitz was a leader who conquered any personal urge to drive, and achieved his ends more by persuasion and inspiration to men under his command.” Edwin Palmer Hoyt in How They Won the War in the Pacific : Nimitz and His Admirals (2000), p. 28 – 29

And

“On April 13, 1943, Allied radio intelligence intercepted a message carrying the travel itinerary of Admiral Yamamoto. The detail in the message listed flight and ground schedules and included what type of fighter escort would be provided. Major Red Lasswell of FRUPAC broke the coded message. The decision of what to do with the information was left to Admiral Nimitz. Nimitz consulted Layton as to what the ramifications would be if Yamamoto were removed. They considered that he might be replaced with a better commander, and Nimitz felt familiar with Yamamoto as his opponent. Layton felt nobody could adequately replace Yamamoto, and based on this opinion Nimitz gave Admiral Halsey the authority to carry out the intercept of Yamamoto’s aircraft. On 18 April, a flight of P-38 fighters with specially selected pilots and equipped with long-range fuel tanks shot down Yamamoto’s aircraft, killing one of Japan’s top naval leaders.” Ricky J. Nussio, in Sherman and Nimitz: Executing Modern Information Operations (2001)

And

“He surrounded himself with the ablest men he could find and sought their advice, but he made his own decisions. He was a keen strategist who never forgot that he was dealing with human beings, on both sides of the conflict. He was aggressive in war without hate, audacious while never failing to weigh the risks.” E. B. Potter, Naval historian at the US Naval Academy, quoted on the cover jacket of his book Nimitz (1976)

And

“Of the Marines on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

And

“He brought to his new job a number of advantages, including experience, a detailed knowledge of his brother officers, and a sense of inner balance and calm that steadied those around him. He had the ability to pick able subordinates and the courage to let them do their jobs without interference. He molded such disparate personalities as the quiet, introspective Raymond A. Spruance and the ebullient, aggressive William F. Halsey, Jr. into an effective team.” Robert William Love, on the rise of Nimitz to CINCPAC in The Chiefs of Naval Operations

Wikipedia: Chester William Nimitz

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 13, 2017 – Paul Brown

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 13, 2017 – Paul Brown

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“A winner never whines.”

And

“Football is a game of errors. The team that makes the fewest errors in a game usually wins.”

And

“The key to winning is poise under stress.”

And

“What we have currently available is what we have available.”

And

“When you win, say nothing. When you lose, say less.”

And

“You can learn a line from a win and a book from a defeat.”

Wikipedia:  Paul Brown

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 12, 2017 – Billy Wilder

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 12, 2017 – Billy Wilder

“A director must be a policeman, a midwife, a psychoanalyst, a sycophant and a bastard.”

And

“If you’re going to tell people the truth, be funny or they’ll kill you.”

And

“I have ten commandments. The first nine are, thou shalt not bore. The tenth is, thou shalt have right of final cut.”

And

“Happiness is working with Jack Lemmon.”

And

“I’d worship the ground you walked on if only you walked in a better neighborhood.”

And

“Now, what is it which makes a scene interesting? If you see a man coming through a doorway, it means nothing. If you see him coming through a window – that is at once interesting.”

And

“Trust your own instinct. Your mistakes might as well be your own, instead of someone else’s.”

And

“Hindsight is always twenty-twenty.”

And

“The Austrians are brilliant people. They made the world believe that Hitler was a German and Beethoven an Austrian.”

And

“If there’s anything I hate more than not being taken seriously, it’s being taken too seriously.”

And

“My Aunt Minnie would always be punctual and never hold up production, but who would pay to see my Aunt Minnie?”

And

“One’s too many, and a hundred’s not enough.”

And

“France is the country where the money falls apart and you can’t tear the toilet paper.”

And

“You have to have a dream so you can get up in the morning.”

And

“An audience is never wrong. An individual member of it may be an imbecile, but a thousand imbeciles together in the dark – that is critical genius.”

And

“Don’t be too clever for an audience. Make it obvious. Make the subtleties obvious also.”

And

“We are on the track of something absolutely mediocre.”

And

“The best director is the one you don’t see.”

And

“They’ve tried to manufacture other Marilyn Monroes and they will undoubtedly keep trying. But it won’t work. She was an original.”

And

“A bad play folds and is forgotten, but in pictures we don’t bury our dead. When you think it’s out of your system, your daughter sees it on television and says, My father is an idiot.”

And

“Eighty percent of a picture is writing, the other twenty percent is the execution, such as having the camera on the right spot and being able to afford to have good actors in all parts.”

And

“The truth always reveals itself.”

And

“Love is the hardest thing in the world to write about. So simple. You’ve got to catch it through details, like the early morning sunlight hitting the gray tin of the rain spout in front of her house. The ringing of a telephone that sounds like Beethoven’s “Pastoral.” A letter scribbled on her office stationery that you carry around in your pocket because it smells of all the lilacs in Ohio.”

And

“I never overestimate the audience, nor do I underestimate them. I just have a very rational idea as to who we’re dealing with, and that we’re not making a picture for Harvard Law School, we’re making a picture for middle-class people, the people that you see on the subway, or the people that you see in a restaurant. Just normal people.”

And

“If you don’t like what you’re doing, it’s unlikely anyone else will either, so be sure you are happy with your own work first.”

Wikipedia:  Billy Wilder

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 11, 2017 – Francis Ford Coppola

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 11, 2017 – Francis Ford Coppola

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“A number of images put together a certain way become something quite above and beyond what any of them are individually.”

And

“Anything you build on a large scale or with intense passion invites chaos.”

And

“Art depends on luck and talent.”

And

“I became quite successful very young, and it was mainly because I was so enthusiastic and I just worked so hard at it.”

And

“It’s ironic that at age 32, at probably the greatest moment of my career, with The Godfather having such an enormous success, I wasn’t even aware of it, because I was somewhere else under the deadline again.”

And

“The stuff that I got in trouble for, the casting for The Godfather or the flag scene in Patton, was the stuff that was remembered, and was considered the good work.”

And

“You have to really be courageous about your instincts and your ideas. Otherwise you’ll just knuckle under, and things that might have been memorable will be lost.”

And

“You ought to love what you’re doing because, especially in a movie, over time you really will start to hate it.”

And

“I think cinema, movies, and magic have always been closely associated. The very earliest people who made film were magicians.”

And

“I believe that filmmaking – as, probably, is everything – is a game you should play with all your cards, and all your dice, and whatever else you’ve got. So, each time I make a movie, I give it everything I have. I think everyone should, and I think everyone should do everything they do that way.”

And

“I associate my motion picture career more with being unhappy and scared, or being under the gun, than with anything pleasant.”

And

“The essence of cinema is editing. It’s the combination of what can be extraordinary images of people during emotional moments, or images in a general sense, put together in a kind of alchemy.”

And

On his film, “Apocalypse Now”, at the 1979 Cannes Film Festival: “My movie is not about Vietnam… my movie is Vietnam.”

And

“Anything you build on a large scale or with intense passion invites chaos.”

And

“Lots of people have criticized my movies, but nobody has ever identified the real problem: I’m a sloppy filmmaker.”

And

“The Godfather changed my life, for better or worse. It definitely made me have an older man’s film career when I was 29. So now I say, ‘If I had my older career when I was young, as an older man, maybe I can have a young film-maker’s career.'”

And

“Brando wants to do what you want, but he wants people to be honest and not try to manipulate him.”

And

“Marlon was never hard to work with. His behaviour was a little eccentric on the set. He was like a bad boy and did what he wanted. But as an actor he was never hard to work with.”

And

“I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor, dumb bastard die for his country.

Men, all this stuff you’ve heard about America not wanting to fight, wanting to stay out of the war, is a lot of horse dung. Americans, traditionally, love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle. When you were kids, you all admired the champion marble shooters, the fastest runners, big league ball players, the toughest boxers. Americans love a winner and will not tolerate a loser. Americans play to win all the time. I wouldn’t give a hoot in hell for a man who lost and laughed. That’s why Americans have never lost and will never lose a war, because the very thought of losing is hateful to Americans.

Now, an army is a team. It lives, eats, sleeps, fights as a team. This individuality stuff is a bunch of crap. The bilious bastards who wrote that stuff about individuality for the Saturday

Evening Post don’t know anything more about real battle than they do about fornicating.

Now, we have the finest food and equipment, the best spirit, and the best men in the world. You know, by God I, I actually pity those poor bastards we’re going up against, by God, I do.

We’re not just going to shoot the bastards; we’re going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks. We’re going to murder those lousy Hun bastards by the bushel.

Now, some of you boys, I know, are wondering whether or not you’ll chicken out under fire. Don’t worry about it. I can assure you that you will all do your duty.

The Nazis are the enemy. Wade into them. Spill their blood. Shoot them in the belly. When you put your hand into a bunch of goo that a moment before was your best friend’s face, you’ll know what to do.

Now there’s another thing I want you to remember: I don’t want to get any messages saying that we are holding our position. We’re not holding anything. Let the Hun do that. We are advancing constantly and we’re not interested in holding onto anything except the enemy. We’re going to hold onto him by the nose and we’re going to kick him in the ass. We’re going to kick the hell out of him all the time and we’re going to go through him like crap through a goose.

Now, there’s one thing that you men will be able to say when you get back home. And you may thank God for it. Thirty years from now when you’re sitting around your fireside with your grandson on your knee, and he asks you: “What did you do in the great World War II?” You won’t have to say, “Well, I shoveled shit in Louisiana.”

Alright, now, you sons-of-bitches, you know how I feel. Oh… I will be proud to lead you wonderful guys into battle anytime, anywhere.

That’s all.” Opening Speech by George C. Scott playing General Patton in move Patton

And

“It was here. The battlefield was here. The Carthaginians defending the city were attacked by three Roman Legions. The Carthaginians were proud and brave but they couldn’t hold. They were massacred. The Arab women stripped them of the tunics and swords, and lances. And the soldiers lay naked in the sun. 2000 years ago. I was here. (Looking at Bradley) You don’t believe me, do you Brad?

You know what the poet said:
‘Through the travail of ages,
Midst the pomp and toils of war,
Have I fought and strove and perished
Countless times upon a star.
As if through a glass, and darkly
The age-old strife I see—
Where I fought in many guises, many names—
but always me.’
Do you know who the poet was? Me.” Battle of Carthage Scene, movie Patton

And

“All Mighty and most merciful Father, We humbly beseech Thee, of thy great goodness to restrain this immoderate weather with which we have had to contend. Grant us fair weather for battle. Graciously hearken to us as soldiers who call upon Thee that, armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies and establish Thy justice among men and nations. Amen.” Weather Prayer, move Patton

Wikipedia: Francis Ford Coppola

Francis Ford Coppola Winery

Coppola – Inglenook – Rubicon Winery

American Zoetrope

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, October 10, 2017 – Frank Lloyd Wright

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, October 10, 2017 – Frank Lloyd Wright

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“A free America… means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call democracy is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

And

“Early in life I had to choose between honest arrogance and hypocritical humility. I chose the former and have seen no reason to change.”

And

“Freedom is from within.”

And

“Get the habit of analysis – analysis will in time enable synthesis to become your habit of mind.”

And

“Harvard takes perfectly good plums as students, and turns them into prunes.”

And

“I believe totally in a Capitalist System, I only wish that someone would try it.”

And

“I know the price of success:  dedication, hard work and an unremitting devotion to thing you want to see happen.”

And

“Life always rides in strength to victory, not through internationalism… but only through the direct responsibility of the individual.”

And

“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.”

And

“The heart is the chief feature of a functioning mind.”

And

“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.”

And

“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

And

“The thing always happens that you really believe in; and the belief in a thing makes it happen.”

And

“The truth is more important than the facts.”

And

“”Think simple” as my old master used to say – meaning reduce the whole of its parts into the simplest terms, getting back to first principles.”

And

“There is nothing more uncommon than common sense.”

And

“No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It should be of the hill. Belonging to it. Hill and house should live together each the happier for the other.”

And

“A free America, democratic in the sense that our forefathers intended it to be, means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call ‘democracy’ is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

And

“Every great architect is — necessarily — a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.”

And

“Human beings can be beautiful. If they are not beautiful it is entirely their own fault. It is what they do to themselves that makes them ugly. The longer I live the more beautiful life becomes. If you foolishly ignore beauty, you will soon find yourself without it. Your life will be impoverished. But if you invest in beauty, it will remain with you all the days of your life.”

And

“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

Wikipedia:  Frank Lloyd Wright

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