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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Thursday, April 24, 2014 – William Shakespeare

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Thursday, April 24, 2014 – William Shakespeare

WilliamShakespeare738

“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.”

And

“Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.”

And

“Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.”

And

“Life every man holds dear; but the dear man holds honor far more precious dear than life.”

And

“Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”

And

“Listen to many, speak to a few.”

And

“Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.”

And

“Talking isn’t doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds.”

And

“There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat. And we must take the current when it serves, or lose our ventures.”

And

“Things done well and with a care, exempt themselves from fear.”

And

“To be, or not to be: that is the question.”

And

“To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.”

And

“We know what we are, but know not what we may be.”

And

“To be, or not to be, — that is the question: —
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? — To die, to sleep, —
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache, and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, — ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep; —
To sleep, perchance to dream: — ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despis’d love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would these fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death, —
The undiscover’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, — puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know naught of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought;
And enterprises of great pith and moment,
With this regard, their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.”
Hamlet, Act III, Scene 1

And

“She should have died hereafter;
There would have been time for such a word.
Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.”
Macbeth, Act V, Scene 5

And

“There is a tide in the affairs of men
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat;
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.”
Julius Caesar, Brutus, Act IV, Scene 3

And

“My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have, for both are infinite.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“When he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“Don’t waste your love on somebody, who doesn’t value it.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“There’s an old saying that applies to me: you can’t lose a game if you don’t play the game. (Act 1, scene 4)”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,
Which is as thin of substance as the air,
And more inconstant than the wind, who woos
Even now the frozen bosom of the north,
And, being anger’d, puffs away from thence,
Turning his side to the dew-dropping south.”
Romeo and Juliet

Wikipedia:  William Shakespeare

WilliamShake77

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, April 23, 2014 – Carl Sagan

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, April 23, 2014 – Carl Sagan

CarlSagan777

“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.”

And

“But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”

And

“For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.”

And

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

And

“I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students.”

And

“I can find in my undergraduate classes, bright students who do not know that the stars rise and set at night, or even that the Sun is a star.”

And

“If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits?”

And

“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

And

“Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere.”

And

“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.”

And

“Personally, I would be delighted if there were a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out.”

And

“Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”

And

“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

And

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”

And

“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.”

And

“The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.”

And

“The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent.”

And

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”

and

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

And

“Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.”

And

“The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what’s true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth — never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key.”

And

“Who is more humble? The scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever it has to teach us, or somebody who says everything in this book must be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of all the human beings involved?”

And

“The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion and politics, but it is not the path to knowledge; it has no place in the endeavor of science.”

And

“Matter is composed chiefly of nothing.”

And

“Other things being equal, it is better to be smart than to be stupid.”

And

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

And

“Humans are very good at dreaming, although you’d never know it from your television.”

And

“In the fabric of space and in the nature of matter, as in a great work of art, there is, written small, the artist’s signature.”

And

“We on Earth have just awakened to the great oceans of space and time from which we have emerged. We are the legacy of 15 billion years of cosmic evolution. We have a choice: We can enhance life and come to know the universe that made us, or we can squander our 15 billion-year heritage in meaningless self-destruction. What happens in the first second of the next cosmic year depends on what we do, here and now, with our intelligence and our knowledge of the cosmos.”

And

“As a boy Kepler had been captured by a vision of cosmic splendour, a harmony of the worlds which he sought so tirelessly all his life. Harmony in this world eluded him. His three laws of planetary motion represent, we now know, a real harmony of the worlds, but to Kepler they were only incidental to his quest for a cosmic system based on the Perfect Solids, a system which, it turns out, existed only in his mind. Yet from his work, we have found that scientific laws pervade all of nature, that the same rules apply on Earth as in the skies, that we can find a resonance, a harmony, between the way we think and the way the world works. When he found that his long cherished beliefs did not agree with the most precise observations, he accepted the uncomfortable facts, he preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions. That is the heart of science.”

And

“Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

And

“A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the Moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the Moon these days.”

And

“Education on the value of free speech and the other freedoms reserved by the Bill of Rights, about what happens when you don’t have them, and about how to exercise and protect them, should be an essential prerequisite for being an American citizen — or indeed a citizen of any nation, the more so to the degree that such rights remain unprotected. If we can’t think for ourselves, if we’re unwilling to question authority, then we’re just putty in the hands of those in power. But if the citizens are educated and form their own opinions, then those in power work for us. In every country, we should be teaching our children the scientific method and the reasons for a Bill of Rights. With it comes a certain decency, humility and community spirit. In the demon-haunted world that we inhabit by virtue of being human, this may be all that stands between us and the enveloping darkness.”

And

“When we consider the founders of our nation: Jefferson, Washington, Samuel and John Adams, Madison and Monroe, Benjamin Franklin, Tom Paine and many others; we have before us a list of at least ten and maybe even dozens of great political leaders. They were well educated. Products of the European Enlightenment, they were students of history. They knew human fallibility and weakness and corruptibility. They were fluent in the English language. They wrote their own speeches. They were realistic and practical, and at the same time motivated by high principles. They were not checking the pollsters on what to think this week. They knew what to think. They were comfortable with long-term thinking, planning even further ahead than the next election. They were self-sufficient, not requiring careers as politicians or lobbyists to make a living. They were able to bring out the best in us. They were interested in and, at least two of them, fluent in science. They attempted to set a course for the United States into the far future — not so much by establishing laws as by setting limits on what kinds of laws could be passed. The Constitution and its Bill of Rights have done remarkably well, constituting, despite human weaknesses, a machine able, more often than not, to correct its own trajectory. At that time, there were only about two and a half million citizens of the United States. Today there are about a hundred times more. So if there were ten people of the caliber of Thomas Jefferson then, there ought to be 10 x 100 = 1,000 Thomas Jefferson’s today. Where are they?”

Wikipedia:  Carl Sagan

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, April 22, 2014 – James Dean

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, April 22, 2014 – James Dean

JamesDean737

“Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.”

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“There is no way to be truly great in this world. We are all impaled on the crook of conditioning.”

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“Being an actor is the loneliest thing in the world. You are all alone with your concentration and imagination, and that’s all you have.”

And

“Only the gentle are ever really strong.”

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“Being a good actor isn’t easy. Being a man is even harder. I want to be both before I’m done.”

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“When an actor plays a scene exactly the way a director orders, it isn’t acting. It’s following instructions. Anyone with the physical qualifications can do that.”

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“If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live on after he’s dead, then maybe he was a great man.”

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“To grasp the full significance of life is the actor’s duty; to interpret it his problem; and to express it his dedication.”

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“The gratification comes in the doing, not in the results.”

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“The only greatness for man is immortality.”

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“I also became close to nature, and am now able to appreciate the beauty with which this world is endowed.”

Wikipedia:  James Dean

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Monday, April 21, 2014 – Alexander Graham Bell

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Monday, April 21, 2014 – Alexander Graham Bell

Alex777

“A man, as a general rule, owes very little to what he is born with – a man is what he makes of himself.”

And

“Before anything else, preparation is the key to success.”

And

“Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand.  The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.”

And

“The most successful men in the end are those whose success is the result of steady accretion.”

And

“What this power is I cannot say; all I know is that it exists and it becomes available only when a man is in that state of mind in which he knows exactly what he wants and is fully determined not to quit until he finds it.”

And

“When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.”

And

“Sometimes we stare so long at a door that is closing that we see too late the one that is open.”

And

“Great discoveries and improvements invariably involve the cooperation of many minds. I may be given credit for having blazed the trail, but when I look at the subsequent developments I feel the credit is due to others rather than to myself.”

And

“Mr. Watson — Come here — I want to see you.”
First intelligible words spoken over the telephone (10 March 1876), as recorded in Bell’s Journal entry (10 March 1876). These are often misquoted as “Mr. Watson, come here, I want you.” Watson later recounted that Bell had spilled battery acid and had called for him over the phone with these words, but this may have been in a separate incident.

And

“There cannot be mental atrophy in any person who continues to observe, to remember what he observes, and to seek answers for his unceasing hows and whys about things.”

And

“The inventor…looks upon the world and is not contented with things as they are. He wants to improve whatever he sees, he wants to benefit the world; he is haunted by an idea. The spirit of invention possesses him, seeking materialization.”

And

“I begin my work at about nine or ten o’clock in the evening and continue until four or five in the morning. Night is a more quiet time to work. It aids thought.”

And

“Perseverance must have some practical end, or it does not avail the man possessing it. A person without a practical end in view becomes a crank or an idiot. Such persons fill our asylums.”

And

“I am a believer in unconscious cerebration. The brain is working all the time, though we do not know it. At night it follows up what we think in the daytime. When I have worked a long time on one thing, I make it a point to bring all the facts regarding it together before I retire; I have often been surprised at the results… We are thinking all the time; it is impossible not to think.”

And

“You cannot force ideas. Successful ideas are the result of slow growth. Ideas do not reach perfection in a day, no matter how much study is put upon them.”

And

“Don’t keep forever on the public road. Leave the beaten track behind occasionally and dive into the woods. You will be certain to find something you have never seen before, and something worth thinking about to occupy your mind. All really big discoveries are the result of thought.”

Wikipedia Page:  Alexander Graham Bell

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Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Sunday, April 20, 2014 – Mark Twain

Coaches Hot Seat NFL Quotes of the Day – Sunday, April 20, 2014 – Mark Twain

MarkTwain777

“At last the lake burst upon us–a noble sheet of blue water lifted six thousand three hundred feet above the level of the sea, and walled in by a rim of snow-clad mountain peaks that towered aloft three thousand feet higher still! As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole world affords.”  Mark Twain on Lake Tahoe, Roughing It, 1861

And

“It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native criminal class except Congress.”

And

“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

And

“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.”

And

“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

And

“A man is never more truthful than when he acknowledges himself a liar.”

And

“A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. “

And

“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.”

And

“Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

And

“Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.”

And

“Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

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“Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today.”

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“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

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“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”

And

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

And

“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

And

“There are lies, damned lies and statistics.”

And

“The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

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“A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation.”

And

“When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.”

And

“All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.”

And

“My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.”

And

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.”

And

“The most interesting information comes from children, for they tell all they know and then stop.”

And

“Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.”

And

“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”

And

“The trouble ain’t that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain’t distributed right.”

And

“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”

And

“Substitute “damn” every time you’re inclined to write “very”; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

And

“When angry, count to four; when very angry, swear.”

And

“Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.”

And

‘There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded.”

And

“A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

And

“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way.”

And

“Let us live so that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

And

“It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.”

And

“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”

And

“The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

And

“The man who is a pessimist before 48 knows too much; if he is an optimist after it, he knows too little.”

And

“The public is the only critic whose opinion is worth anything at all.”

And

“I haven’t a particle of confidence in a man who has no redeeming petty vices whatsoever.”

And

‘Reader, suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.”

And

“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—’tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

And

“Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our hardnesses yield, all our irritations and resentments flit away and a sunny spirit takes their place.”

And

“I was sorry to have my name mentioned as one of the great authors, because they have a sad habit of dying off. Chaucer is dead, Spencer is dead, so is Milton, so is Shakespeare, and I’m not feeling so well myself.”

And

“Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest.”

And

“The only reason why God created man is because he was disappointed with the monkey.”

And

“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

And

“Always acknowledge a fault frankly. This will throw those in authority off their guard and give you opportunity to commit more.”

And

“Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered — either by themselves or by others. But for the Civil War, Lincoln and Grant and Sherman and Sheridan would not have been discovered, nor have risen into notice. … I have touched upon this matter in a small book which I wrote a generation ago and which I have not published as yet — Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven. When Stormfield arrived in heaven he … was told that … a shoemaker … was the most prodigious military genius the planet had ever produced.”

And

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.” The Innocents Abroad, 1869

And

“He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it — namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

And

“Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and…Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

And

“France has neither winter nor summer nor morals. Apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.”

And

“Familiarity breeds contempt — and children.”

And

“In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot”

And

“Never let your schooling interfere with your education.”

And

“Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.”

Wikipedia:  Mark Twain

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