Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, February 17, 2017 – Oliver Cromwell

 

“A few honest men are better than numbers.”

And

“Not only strike while the iron is hot, but make it hot by striking.”

And 

“I had rather have a plain, russet-coated Captain, that knows what he fights for, and loves what he knows, than that you call a Gentleman and is nothing else.”  

And

“He who stops being better stops being good.”

And

“Keep your faith in God, but keep your powder dry.”

And

“The State, in choosing men to serve it, takes no notice of their opinions. If they be willing faithfully to serve it, that satisfies.”

And

“We declared our intentions to preserve monarchy, and they still are so, unless necessity enforce an alteration. It’s granted the king has broken his trust, yet you are fearful to declare you will make no further addresses… look on the people you represent, and break not your trust, and expose not the honest party of your kingdom, who have bled for you, and suffer not misery to fall upon them for want of courage and resolution in you, else the honest people may take such courses as nature dictates to them.”
Speech in the Commons during the debate which preceded the “Vote of No Addresses” (January 1648) as recorded in the diary of John Boys of Kent.

And

“I tell you we will cut off his head with the crown upon it.”
To Algernon Sidney, one of the judges at the trial of Charles I (December 1648)

And

“No one rises so high as he who knows not whither he is going.”

And

“Though peace be made, yet it’s interest that keep peace.”
Quoted in a statement to Parliament as as “a maxim not to be despised” (4 September 1654).

And

“I was by birth a gentleman, living neither in any considerable height, nor yet in obscurity. I have been called to several employments in the nation — to serve in parliaments, — and ( because I would not be over tedious ) I did endeavour to discharge the duty of an honest man in those services, to God, and his people’s interest, and of the commonwealth; having, when time was, a competent acceptation in the hearts of men, and some evidence thereof.”
Speech to the First Protectorate Parliament (12 September 1654).

And

“I desire not to keep my place in this government an hour longer than I may preserve England in its just rights, and may protect the people of God in such a just liberty of their consciences…”
Speech dissolving the First Protectorate Parliament (22 January 1655).

And

“We are Englishmen; that is one good fact.”
Speech to Parliament (1655).

And

“I would have been glad to have lived under my wood side, to have kept a flock of sheep, rather than undertook such a Government as this is.”
Statement to Parliament (4 February 1658)

Wikipedia Page:  Oliver Cromwell

OliverCromwell188

OliverCromwell188100

OliverCromwell188190

OliverCromwell188910

OliverCromwell8810990

OliverCromwell818881

Leave a Comment