Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, March 28, 2017 – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

 

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“Any truth is better than indefinite doubt.”

And

“My mind rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me the most abstruse cryptogram, or the most intricate analysis, and I am in my own proper atmosphere. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for mental exaltation.”

And

“Where there is no imagination there is no horror.”

And

“It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.”

And

“Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius.”

And

“Violence does, in truth, recoil upon the violent, and the schemer falls into the pit which he digs for another.”

And

“I never guess. It is a shocking habit destructive to the logical faculty.”

And

“The lowest and vilest alleys of London do not present a more dreadful record of sin than does the smiling and beautiful countryside.”

And

“We can’t command our love, but we can our actions.”

And

“It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data.”

And

“I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose.”

And

“There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.”

And

“Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.”

And

“I have frequently gained my first real insight into the character of parents by studying their children.”

And

“From a drop of water a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other.”

And

“As a rule, said Holmes, the more bizarre a thing is the less mysterious it proves to be. It is your commonplace, featureless crimes which are really puzzling, just as a commonplace face is the most difficult to identify.”

And

“A trusty comrade is always of use; and a chronicler still more so.”

And

“His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge.”

And

“The ideal reasoner, he remarked, would, when he had once been shown a single fact in all its bearings, deduce from it not only all the chain of events which led up to it but also all the results which would follow from it.”

And

“When a doctor does go wrong he is the first of criminals. He has nerve and he has knowledge.”

And

“The most difficult crime to track is the one which is purposeless.”

And

“Our ideas must be as broad as Nature if they are to interpret Nature.”

And

“The highest morality may prove also to be the highest wisdom when the half-told story comes to be finished.”

And

“I should dearly love that the world should be ever so little better for my presence. Even on this small stage we have our two sides, and something might be done by throwing all one’s weight on the scale of breadth, tolerance, charity, temperance, peace, and kindliness to man and beast. We can’t all strike very big blows, and even the little ones count for something.”

And

“The more we progress the more we tend to progress. We advance not in arithmetical but in geometrical progression. We draw compound interest on the whole capital of knowledge and virtue which has been accumulated since the dawning of time. Some eighty thousand years are supposed to have existed between paleolithic and neolithic man. Yet in all that time he only learned to grind his flint stones instead of chipping them. But within our father’s lives what changes have there not been? The railway and the telegraph, chloroform and applied electricity. Ten years now go further than a thousand then, not so much on account of our finer intellects as because the light we have shows us the way to more. Primeval man stumbled along with peering eyes, and slow, uncertain footsteps. Now we walk briskly towards our unknown goal.”

And

“What can we know? What are we all? Poor silly half-brained things peering out at the infinite, with the aspirations of angels and the instincts of beasts.”

And

STEEL TRUE
BLADE STRAIGHT
ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE
KNIGHT
PATRIOT, PHYSICIAN & MAN OF LETTERS
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Epitath

Wikipedia Page:  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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