Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, May 16, 2018 – Tom Wolfe

 

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“The whole conviction of my life now rests upon the belief that loneliness, far from being a rare and curious phenomenon, peculiar to myself and to a few other solitary men, is the central and inevitable fact of human existence.”

And

“The surest cure for vanity is loneliness.”

And

“Most people don’t read editorial pages. I think I must have been 40 before I even looked at an editorial page.”

And

“If a conservative is a liberal who’s been mugged, a liberal is a conservative who’s been arrested.”

And

“On Wall Street he and a few others – how many? three hundred, four hundred, five hundred? had become precisely that… Masters of the Universe.”

And

“I’m a great believer in outlines.”

And

“Love is the ultimate expression of the will to live.”

And

“I never forget. I never forgive. I can wait. I find it very easy to harbor a grudge. I have scores to settle.”

And

“God, newspapers have been making up stories forever. This kind of trifling and fooling around is not a function of the New Journalism.”

And

“American government is like a train on a track. You have the people on the left shouting; you have the people on the right. But the train’s on track. They just keep ploughing ahead.”

And

“So many people in this country have a dual loyalty. They have loyalty to America, but they also are determined to have their parade up Fifth Avenue once a year… a Cuban parade or a Puerto Rican parade – many other countries. So they really don’t forget.”

And

“To me, the great joy of writing is discovering. Most writers are told to write about what they know, but I still love the adventure of going out and reporting on things I don’t know about.”

And

“Perhaps this is our strange and haunting paradox here in America — that we are fixed and certain only when we are in movement. At any rate, that is how it seemed to young George Webber, who was never so assured of his purpose as when he was going somewhere on a train. And he never had the sense of home so much as when he felt that he was going there. It was only when he got there that his homelessness began.”

And

“This is man, who, if he can remember ten golden moments of joy and happiness out of all his years, ten moments unmarked by care, unseamed by aches or itches, has power to lift himself with his expiring breath and say: “I have lived upon this earth and known glory!”

And

“One belongs to New York instantly, one belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years”

And

“A young man is so strong, so mad, so certain, and so lost. He has everything and he is able to use nothing.”

And

“We are always acting on what has just finished happening. It happened at least 1/30th of a second ago. We think we’re in the present, but we aren’t. The present we know is only a movie of the past.”

And

“America – It is a fabulous country, the only fabulous country; it is the only place where miracles not only happen, but where they happen all the time”

And

“You have reached the pinnacle of success as soon as you become uninterested in money, compliments, or publicity.”

And

“There was a demon that lived in the air. They said whoever challenged him would die. Their controls would freeze up, their planes would buffet wildly, and they would disintegrate. The demon lived at Mach 1 on the meter, seven hundred and fifty miles an hour, where the air could no longer move out of the way. He lived behind a barrier through which they said no man could ever pass. They called it the sound barrier.”

And

“There are some people who have the quality of richness and joy in them and they communicate it to everything they touch. It is first of all a physical quality; then it is a quality of the spirit.”

And

“There is no spectacle on earth more appealing than that of a beautiful woman in the act of cooking dinner for someone she loves.”

And

“Chuck Yeager: Hey, Ridley
Colonel Ridley: Yeah
Chuck Yeager: You got any Beemans?
Colonel Ridley: I might have a stick
Chuck Yeager: Loan me some. I’ll pay you back later.
Colonel Ridley: Fair Enough.
Chuck Yeager: I think there’s a plane over here with my name on it.”
Colonel Ridley: Now you’re talking.”

And

“You never realize how much of your background is sewn into the lining of your clothes.”

And

“Everybody, everybody everywhere, has his own movie going, his own scenario, and everybody is acting his movie out like mad, only most people don’t know that is what they’re trapped by, their little script.”

And

“I’d rather be a lightning rod than a seismograph.”

And

“None of us are going to deny what other people are doing. If saying bullshit is somebody’s thing, then he says bullshit. If somebody is an ass-kicker, then that’s what he’s going to do on this trip, kick asses. He’s going to do it right out front and nobody is going to have anything to get pissed off about. He can just say, ‘I’m sorry I kicked you in the ass, but I’m not sorry I’m an ass-kicker. That’s what I do, I kick people in the ass.’ Everybody is going to be what they are, and whatever they are, there’s not going to be anything to apologize about. What we are, we’re going to wail with on this whole trip.”

And

“[Aldous Huxley] compared the brain to a ‘reducing valve’. In ordinary perception, the senses send an overwhelming flood of information to the brain, which the brain then filters down to a trickle it can manage for the purpose of survival in a highly competitive world. Man has become so rational, so utilitarian, that the trickle becomes most pale and thin. It is efficient, for mere survival, but it screens out the most wondrous part of man’s potential experience without his even knowing it. We’re shut off from our own world.”

And

“The reason a writer writes a book is to forget a book and the reason a reader reads one is to remember it. ”

And

“(W)hat I write when I force myself is generally just as good as what I write when I’m feeling inspired. It’s mainly a matter of forcing yourself to write.”

And

“Sherman made the terrible discovery that men make about their fathers sooner or later… that the man before him was not an aging father but a boy, a boy much like himself, a boy who grew up and had a child of his own and, as best he could, out of a sense of duty and, perhaps love, adopted a role called Being a Father so that his child would have something mythical and infinitely important: a Protector, who would keep a lid on all the chaotic and catastrophic possibilities of life.”

And

“The problem with fiction, it has to be plausible. That’s not true with non-fiction.”

And

“America is a wonderful country! I mean it! No honest writer would challenge that statement! The human comedy never runs out of material! it never lets you down!”

And

“Inman was Old Atlanta, insofar as there was any Old Atlanta. Atlanta had never been a true Old Southern city like Savannah or Charleston or Richmond, where wealth had originated with the land. Atlanta was an offspring of the railroad business. It has been created from scratch barely 150 years ago, and people had been making money there on the hustle ever since. The place had already run through three names. First they called it Terminus, because that was where the railroad ended. Then they named it Marthasville, after the wife of the governor. Then they called it Atlanta, after the Western and Atlantic railroad and on the boosters’ pretext that the rail link with Savannah made it a tantamount to a port on the Atlantic Ocean itself. The Armholsters had hustled and boosted with the best of them, Charlie had to admit. Inman’s father had built up a pharmaceuticals company back at the time when that was not even a well-known industry, and Inman had turned it into a chemicals conglomerate, Armaxco. Right now he wouldn’t mind being in Inman’s shoes. Armaxco was so big, so diverse, so well established, it was cycleproof. Inman could probably go to sleep for twenty years and Armaxco would just keep chugging away, minting money. Not that Inman would want to miss a minute of it. He loved all of those board meetings too much, loved being up on the dais at all those banquets too much, loved all those tributes to Inman Armholster the great philanthropist, all those junkets to the north of Italy, the south of France, and God knew where else on Armholster’s Falcon 900, all those minions jumping every time he so much as crooked his finger. With a corporate structure like Armaxco’s beneath him, Inman could sit on that throne of his as long as he wanted or until he downed the last mouthful of lamb shanks and mint jelly God allowed him – whereas he, Charlie, was a one-man band! You had to sell the world on…..yourself! Before they could lend you all that money, they had to believe in….you! They had to think you were some kind of omnipotent, flaw-free genius. Not my corporation but Me, Myself & I! His mistake was that he had started believed it himself, hadn’t he……Why had he ever built a mixed-use development out in Cherokee County crowned with a forty-story tower and named it after himself? Croker Concourse! No other Atlanta developer had ever dared display that much ego, whether he had it or not. And now the damned thing stood there, 60 percent empty and hemorrhaging money.”  A Man In Full

Wikipedia:  Tom Wolfe

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