Author Archive: Harry

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 25, 2019 – George Santayana

GeorgeSantanya28191

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

And

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.”

And

“A child educated only at school is an uneducated child.”

And

“A conception not reducible to the small change of daily experience is like a currency not exchangeable for articles of consumption; it is not a symbol, but a fraud.”

And

“A man’s feet should be planted in his country, but his eyes should survey the world.”

And

“A string of excited, fugitive, miscellaneous pleasures is not happiness; happiness resides in imaginative reflection and judgment, when the picture of one’s life, or of human life, as it truly has been or is, satisfies the will, and is gladly accepted.”

And

“All thought is naught but a footnote to Plato.”

And

“Chaos is a name for any order that produces confusion in our minds.”

And

“Character is the basis of happiness and happiness the sanction of character.”

And

“Do not have evil-doers for friends, do not have low people for friends: have virtuous people for friends, have for friends the best of men.”

And

“Friends are generally of the same sex, for when men and women agree, it is only in the conclusions; their reasons are always different.”

And

“Happiness is the only sanction of life; where happiness fails, existence remains a mad and lamentable experiment.”

And

“Intelligence is quickness in seeing things as they are.”

And

“Knowledge of what is possible is the beginning of happiness.”

And

“Life is not a spectacle or a feast; it is a predicament.”

And

“Nonsense is so good only because common sense is so limited.”

And

“The Difficult is that which can be done immediately; the Impossible that which takes a little longer.”

And

“The dreamer can know no truth, not even about his dream, except by awaking out of it.”

And

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.”

And

“The great difficulty in education is to get experience out of ideas.”

And

“The young man who has not wept is a savage, and the older man who will not laugh is a fool.”

And

“Theory helps us to bear our ignorance of facts.”

And

“There is no cure for birth and death save to enjoy the interval.”

And

“To delight in war is a merit in the soldier, a dangerous quality in the captain, and a positive crime in the statesman.”

And

“To knock a thing down, especially if it is cocked at an arrogant angle, is a deep delight of the blood.”

And

“We must welcome the future, remembering that soon it will be the past; and we must respect the past, remembering that it was once all that was humanly possible.”

And

“There is nothing impossible in the existence of the supernatural: its existence seems to me decidedly probable.”

And

“Skepticism, like chastity, should not be relinquished too readily.”

And

“Beauty as we feel it is something indescribable: what it is or what it means can never be said.”

And

“The highest form of vanity is love of fame.”

And

“Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

Wikipedia: George Santayana

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 24, 2019 – Paul Brown

PaulBrown778

“A winner never whines.”

And

“Football is a game of errors. The team that makes the fewest errors in a game usually wins.”

And

“The key to winning is poise under stress.”

And

“What we have currently available is what we have available.”

And

“When you win, say nothing. When you lose, say less.”

And

“You can learn a line from a win and a book from a defeat.”

Wikipedia:  Paul Brown

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, June 23, 2019 – Bill Walsh

Bill Walsh’s Five Don’ts

“1. Don’t ask, “Why me?”

2. Don’t expect sympathy.

3. Don’t bellyache.

4. Don’t keep accepting condolences.

5. Don’t blame others.”

And

“If you see players who hate practice, their coach isn’t doing a very good job.”

And

“The absolute bottom line in coaching is organization and preparing for practice.”

And

“A resolute and resourceful leader understands that there are a multitude of means to increase the probability of success. And that’s what it all comes down to, namely, intelligently and relentlessly seeking solutions that will increase your chance of prevailing in a competitive environment. When you do that, the score will take care of itself.”

And

“I’ve observed that if individuals who prevail in a highly competitive environment have any one thing in common besides success, it is failure—and their ability to overcome it.”

And

“The ability to help the people around me self-actualize their goals underlines the single aspect of my abilities and the label that I value most—teacher.”

And

“Failure is part of success, an integral part. Everybody gets knocked down. Knowing it will happen and what you must do when it does is the first step back.”

And

“When you stand and overcome a significant setback, you’ll find an increasing inner confidence and self-assurance that has been created by conquering defeat. Absorbing and overcoming this kind of punishment engenders a sober, steely toughness that results in a hardened sense of independence and a personal belief that you can take on anything, survive and win.”

And

“Great players and great companies don’t suddenly start hunching up, grimacing, and trying to “hit the ball harder” at a critical point. Rather, they’re in a mode, a zone in which they’re performing and depending on their “game,” which they’ve mastered over many months and years of intelligently directed hard work. There’s only so much thinking you can isolate and focus on during that kind of extreme competitive pressure. It has to be tactical more than a conscious effort to really “try harder.” You just want to function very well, up to your potential, effortlessly—do what you already know how to do at the level of excellence you’ve acquired—whether in making a presentation or coaching a game or anything else.”

And

“Everybody’s got an opinion. Leaders are paid to make a decision. The difference between offering an opinion and making a decision is the difference between working for the leader and being the leader.”

And

“We all have in our mind inspiring examples of individuals who persevered beyond the point of reason and common sense and prevailed. We tend to ignore the more numerous examples of individuals who persisted and persisted and finally failed and took everybody down with them because they would not change course or quit. We ignore them because we never heard about them.”

And

“You must be the best version of yourself that you can be; stay within the framework of your own personality and be authentic. If you’re faking it, you’ll be found out.”

And

“The trademark of a well-led organization in sports or business is that it’s virtually self-sustaining and self-directed—almost autonomous. To put it in a more personal way, if your staff doesn’t seem fully mobilized and energized until you enter the room, if they require your presence to carry on at the level of effort and excellence you have tried to install, your leadership has not percolated down.”

And

“Strong leaders don’t plead with individuals to perform.”

And

“Make each person in your employ very aware that his or her well-being has a high priority with the organization and that the well-being of the organization must be his or her highest professional priority.”

And

“The highest-paid, most talented people that you can go out and hire will not perform to their potential unless they feel as if they are part of something special—a family that treats them right.”

And

“It was always my goal to create and maintain a working environment both on and off the field that had a sense of urgency and intensity but did not feel like we were in constant crisis mode.”

And

“In evaluating people, I prize ego. It often translates into a fierce desire to do their best and an inner confidence that stands them in good stead when things really get rough. Psychologists suggest that there is a strong link between ego and competitiveness. All the great performers I’ve ever coached had ego to spare.”

And

“Extra effort,” in whatever form it takes (mental, physical, emotional), cannot be sustained without eventual damage and diminishing returns. There has to be a very acute awareness on your part as to the level of exertion and the toll it’s taking on those you lead.”

And

“By instinct we—leaders—want to run hard all the time; by intellect we know this is not possible. Reconciling those two positions in the context of leadership is an ongoing challenge.”

And

“Concentrate on what will produce results rather than on the results, the process rather than the prize.”

And

“Clear thinking and overly charged emotions are usually antithetical.”

And

“People matter most—more than equipment, investors, inventions, momentum, or X’s and O’s. People are at the heart of achieving organizational greatness.”

And

“Afford each person the same respect, support, and fair treatment you would expect if your roles were reversed. Deal with people individually, not as objects who are part of a herd—that’s the critical factor.”

And

“If you care about how you’re perceived by others, including the public, it’s good to remember the following: Criticism—both deserved and undeserved—is part of the territory when you’re the one calling the shots. Ignore the undeserved; learn from the deserved; lick your wounds and move on.”

And

“Calculated risks are part of what you do, but the idea that something completely crazy will work just because it’s completely crazy is completely crazy.”

And

“One of the common traits of outstanding performers—coaches, athletes, managers, sales representatives, executives, and others who face a daily up/down, win/lose accounting system—is that a rejection, that is, defeat, is quickly forgotten, replaced eagerly by pursuit of a new order, client, or opponent.”

And

“Nothing is more effective than sincere, accurate praise, and nothing is more lame than a cookie-cutter compliment.” 

And

“If you are worthy of emulation, you have left an unbelievable legacy. He was a great coach, a great friend, and I’m going to miss him terribly.” Former coach Dick Vermeil at Coach Bill Walsh Memorial Service

And

“I came to the San Francisco 49ers with a specific goal – to implement what I call the Standard of Performance. It was a way of doing things, a leadership philosophy, that has as much to do with core values, principles, and ideals as with blocking, tackling, and passing; more to do with the mental than with the physical.”

And

“The culture precedes positive results. It doesn’t get tacked on as an afterthought on your way to the victory stand. Champions behave like champions before they’re champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners.”

And

“For me, the road had been rocky at times, triumphant too, but along the way I had never wavered in my dedication to installing – teaching – those actions and attitudes I believed would create a great team, a superior organization. I knew that if I achieved that, the score would take care of itself.”

And

“For me the starting point for everything – before strategy, tactics, theories, managing, organizing, philosophy, methodology, talent, or experience – is work ethic. Without one of significant magnitude you’re dead in the water, finished. I knew the example I set as head coach would be what others in the organization would recognize as the standard they needed to match (at least, most of them would recognize it). If there is such a thing as a trickle-down effect, that’s it. Your staff sees your devotion to work, their people see them, and on through the organization.”

And

“In building and maintaining your organization, place a premium on those who exhibit great desire to keep pushing themselves to higher and higher performance and production levels, who seek to go beyond the highest standards that you, the leader, set. The employee who gets to work early, stays late, fights through illness and personal problems is the one to keep your eye on for greater responsibilities.”

And

“All successful leaders know where we want to go, figure out a way we believe will get the organization there, and then move forward with absolute determination. We may falter from time to time, but ultimately we are unswerving in moving toward our goal; we will not quit. There is an inner compulsion – obsession – to get it done the way you want it done.”

And

“Victory is produced by and belongs to all. Winning a Super Bowl results from you whole team not only doing their individual jobs but perceiving that those jobs contributed to overall success. The trophy doesn’t belong just to a superstar quarterback or CEO, head coach or top salesperson. This is an essential lesson I taught the San Francisco organization: The offensive team is not a country unto itself, nor is the defensive team or the special teams, staff, coaches, or anyone in the organization separate from the fate of the organization. WE are united and fight as one; we win or lose as one.”

Four Leadership Tips From Bill Walsh from…

The Score Takes Care of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership, Amazon.com

1. Making The Best Of What You Have

“What assets do we have right now that we’re not taking advantage of?”

E.g: Walsh took inventory of his Bengals’ struggling offense which was undersized (meaning running the ball was a big challenge) and not capable of passing for long yardage (quarterback Virgil Carter could not throw very far) (though he could throw decently for short yardage).

Walsh then took stock of what he had to work with in terms of field real estate and had an uh-huh realization that they had 53.5 yards of width on the field (about half the distance of the length of the field) and the availability of 5 potential receivers.

Thus the West Coast Offense was born: the idea of throwing more often, to more receivers, for short yardage.

2. Good Leaders Give a Healthy Mix of Positive Criticism (not just negative/constructive criticism).

“If you’re growing a garden, you need to pull out the weeds, but flowers will die if all you do is pick weeds. They need sunshine and water. People are the same.

They need criticism, but they also require positive substantive language and information and true support to truly blossom.”

3. Good Leaders Look For These Five Qualities In Their Hires

1. A fundamental knowledge of the area they’ve been hired to manage
2. A relatively high — but not manic — level of energy and enthusiasm and a personality that is upbeat, motivated and animated.
3. The ability to discern talent in potential employees.
4. An ability to communicate in a relaxed yet authoritative — but not authoritarian — manner.
5. Unconditional loyalty to both you and other staff members.

4. The Four Most Powerful Words In Leadership

“I believe in you” (or equivalent words of your own).

Walsh writes that even Joe Montana (who already had a bunch of confidence) benefited from his coach telling him he believed in him.

Providing confidence to your team is perhaps the most powerful lever you can pull to help them optimize their performance.

And Walsh adds: And nobody will ever come back to you later and say “thank you” for expecting too little of them.

Wikipedia:   Bill Walsh

The book of coach, Seth Wickersham, ESPN.com

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, June 22, 2019 – Norman Mailer

NormanMailer737322

“Every moment of one’s existence one is growing into more or retreating into less.  One is always living a little more or dying a little bit.”

And

“Growth, in some curious way, I suspect, depends on being always in motion just a little bit, one way or another.”

And

“I don’t think life is absurd. I think we are all here for a huge purpose.  I think we shrink from the immensity of the purpose we are here for.

And

“Masculinity is not something given to you, but something you gain.  And you gain it by winning small battles with honor.”

And

“There was that law of life, so cruel and so just, that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same.”

And

“Ultimately a hero is a man who would argue with the gods, and so awakens devils to contest his vision.  The more a man can achieve, the more he may be certain that the devil will inhabit a part of his creation.”

And

“Somerset Maugham … wrote somewhere that “Nobody is any better than he ought to be.”… I carried it along with me as a working philosophy, but I suppose that finally I would have to take exception to the thought … or else the universe is just an elaborate clock.” The Deer Park, 1955

And

“The final purpose of art is to intensify, even, if necessary, to exacerbate, the moral consciousness of people.”

And

“Writing books is the closest men ever come to childbearing.”

And

“With the pride of an artist, you must blow against the walls of every power that exists, the small trumpet of your defiance.”

And

“His consolation in those hours when he was most uncharitable to himself is that taken at his very worst he was at least still worthy of being a character in a novel by Balzac, win one day, lose the next, and do it with boom! and baroque in the style.”

And

“There is no greater importance in all the world like knowing you are right and that the wave of the world is wrong, yet the wave crashes upon you

And

“New York is one of the capitals of the world and Los Angeles is a constellation of plastic, San Francisco is a lady, Boston has become Urban Renewal, Philadelphia and Baltimore and Washington blink like dull diamonds in the smog of Eastern Megalopolis, and New Orleans is unremarkable past the French Quarter. Detroit is a one-trade town, Pittsburgh has lost its golden triangle, St Louis has become the golden arch of the corporation, and nights in Kansas City close early. The oil depletion allowance makes Houston and Dallas naught but checkerboards for this sort of game. But Chicago is a great American city. Perhaps it is the last of the great American cities.”

And

“There are four stages to marriage. First there’s the affair, then there’s the marriage, then children, and finally the fourth stage, without which you cannot know a woman, the divorce.”

And

“We think of Marilyn who was every man’s love affair with America. Marilyn Monroe who was blonde and beautiful and had a sweet little rinky-dink of a voice and all the cleanliness of all the clean American backyards.”

And

“The highest prize in a world of men is the most beautiful woman available on your arm and living there in her heart loyal to you.”

And

“We sail across dominions barely seen, washed by the swells of time. We plow through fields of magnetism. Past and future come together on thunderheads and our dead hearts live with lightning in the wounds of the Gods.”

And

“I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one’s virtue, or one’s courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.”

And

“Obsession is the single most wasteful human activity, because with an obsession you keep coming back and back and back to the same question and never get an answer.”

And

“Booze, pot, too much sex, failure in one’s private life, too much attrition, too much recognition, too little recognition. Nearly everything in the scheme of things works to dull a first-rate talent. But the worst probably is cowardice.”

And

“There was that law of life so cruel and so just which demanded that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same.”

And

“The sickness of our times for me has been just this damn thing that everything has been getting smaller and smaller and less and less important, that the romantic spirit has dried up, that there is no shame today…. We’re all getting so mean and small and petty and ridiculous, and we all live under the threat of extermination.”

And

“On a late-winter evening in 1983, while driving through fog along the Maine coast, recollections of old campfires began to drift into the March mist, and I thought of the Abnaki Indians of the Algonquin tribe who dwelt near Bangor a thousand years ago.”
Harry Hubbard, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“What if there are not only two nostrils, two eyes, two lobes, and so forth, but two psyches as well, and they are separately equipped? They go through life like Siamese twins inside one person…. They can be just a little different, like identical twins, or they can be vastly different, like good and evil.”
Kittredge Gardiner, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one’s virtue, or one’s courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.”
Harry Hubbard, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“Booze, pot, too much sex, failure in one’s private life, too much attrition, too much recognition, too little recognition. Nearly everything in the scheme of things works to dull a first-rate talent. But the worst probably is cowardice.”

And

“There is one expanding horror in American life. It is that our long odyssey toward liberty, democracy and freedom-for-all may be achieved in such a way that utopia remains forever closed, and we live in freedom and hell, debased of style, not individual from one another, void of courage, our fear rationalized away.”

And

“We’ve got an agreeable, comfortable life here as Americans. But under it there’s a huge, free-floating anxiety. Our inner lives, our inner landscape is just like that sky out there — it’s full of smog. We really don’t know what we believe anymore, we’re nervous about everything.”

And

“Writing can wreck your body. You sit there on the chair hour after hour and sweat your guts out to get a few words.”

And

“Heaven and Hell make no sense if the majority of humans are a complex mixture of good and evil. There’s no reason to receive a reward if you’re 57/43—why sit around forever in an elevated version of Club Med? That’s almost impossible to contemplate.”

And

“If a person is not talented enough to be a novelist, not smart enough to be a lawyer, and his hands are too shaky to perform operations, he becomes a journalist.”

Wikipedia Page:  Norman Mailer

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, June 21, 2019 – Bobby Bowden

BobbyBowden249

“He doesn’t know the meaning of the word fear, but then again he doesn’t know the meaning of most words.”

And

“Discipline to me is sacrifice; it’s willingness to give up something you want to do, so you can better yourself.”

And

“I learned a long time ago that you don’t have to go around using bad language and trying to hurt people to show how macho you are. That stuff won’t get you anywhere, it just shows lack of vocabulary and character.”

And

“The greatest mistake is to continue to practice a mistake.”

And

“I wasn’t afraid of nothing. I was concerned that our opponents. Just picture now. We’re trying to recruit this kid out of Tampa. OK, I go down and see him. An opponent coach comes there and says, ‘Hey, you don’t want to go to Florida State. Bobby Bowden’s got cancer. He’s 77 years old, he’s not going to be alive next year.”

And

“If short hair and good manners won football games, Army and Navy would play for the national championship every year.”

And

“Somehow, I went from being too young, to being too old. Somewhere in there I must have been just right.”

And

“Son, you’ve got a good engine, but your hands aren’t on the steering wheel.”

And

“I am not happy with moral victories. Those things are forgotten.”

And

“I’ve always said it takes more courage to stand back there and throw a ball knowing you’re fixing to get drilled than anything I can think of in football.”

And

“To have the kind of year you want to have, something has to happen that you can’t explain why it happened. Something has to happen that you can’t coach.”

And

“If somebody mistreats you, treat ’em good. That kills ’em.”

And

“I guess I’ll retire someday if I live that long.”

And

“He who gets the best players usually wins.”

And

“Don’t go to the grave with life unused.”

And

“There’s only about 6 inches that turns that halo into a noose.”

And

“But he played Miami. (Bowden on what they might chisel on his headstone)”

And

“You want to know what a real test of faith is? That’s when you go to church and reach into your pocket and all you’ve got is a $20 bill.”

And

“They look so good to me. I’m amazed they’re not on strike.” Bobby Bowden on Florida State losing to the University of Miami during the NFL strike

And

“The Good Lord might not want to take me, but He might be after the pilot.” Bobby Bowden, on his fear of small planes

Wikipedia: Bobby Bowden

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, June 20, 2019 – Darrell Royal

DarrellRoyal7378

“A boy shows how much he wants to play in the spring, when it’s tough, and during two a days, when it’s hot and tough. I don’t count on the boy who waits till October, when it’s cool and fun, then decides he wants to play. Maybe he’s better than three guys ahead of him, but I know those three won’t change their minds in the fourth quarter.”

And

“Breaks balance out. The sun don’t shine on the same ol’ dog’s rear end every day.”

And

“Football doesn’t build character. It eliminates the weak ones.”

And

“I learned this about coaching: You don’t have to explain victory and you can’t explain defeat.”

And

“Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.”

And

“Once you cross the 50 you feel like an unsaddled horse.”

And

“Punt returns will kill you quicker than a minnow can swim a dipper.”

And

“You know, a football coach is nothing more than a teacher. You teach them the same subject, and you have a group of new guys every year.”

And

“You’ve got to think lucky. If you fall into a mudhole, check your back pocket – you might have caught a fish.”

And

“You’ve got to be in a position for luck to happen. Luck doesn’t go around looking for a stumblebum.”

And

“On game day, I am more nervous than a pig in a packing plant.”

And

“There’s an old saying, ‘You dance with who brung ya.’”

And

“Really, it was said about two-thirds in jest. Since we won the Arkansas and Notre Dame games with fourth-down and short-yardage passes, another image has arisen. I’ve been pictured as a man who takes chances. Two stinkin’ plays, and I’m a helluva gambler.”

And

“Some of them are so green you could hide ‘em on top of a lettuce leaf.”

And

“He could run like small-town gossip.”

And

“Ol’ Ugly is better than Ol’ Nothing.”

And

“They’re gonna come after us with their eyes pulled up like BBs.”

And

“There was a hornet’s nest waiting for us in Houston, and we were walking into it like Little Red Riding Hood with jam on her face.”

And

“Winning coaches must treat mistakes like copperheads in the bedclothes – avoid them with all the energy you can muster.”

And

“The best thing a coach can hope for is to please the majority. And the only way to please the majority is to win.”

And

“I’m pretty thin-skinned. When they say, ‘Do you want some constructive criticism?’ I say, ‘No.’”

And

“It’s an in-the-trench battle. It’s meat on meat, flesh on flesh and stink on stink. And that’s the only way you can play it.”

And

“Trends are bunk. Only angry people win football games.”

And

“We don’t want candy stripes on our uniforms. These are work clothes.”

And

“He’s as quick as a hiccup.”

And

“He doesn’t have a lot of speed, but maybe Elizabeth Taylor can’t sing.”

And

“I didn’t want to stay until I had used up all the enjoyment because that’s too long to stay anywhere.”

And

“If worms carried pistols, birds wouldn’t eat ’em.”

Wikipedia: Darrell Royal

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, Wednesday June 19, 2019 – Bud Wilkinson

BudWilkinson281819

“Football in its purest form remains a physical fight. As in any fight, if you don’t want to fight, it’s impossible to win.”

And

“Morale and attitude are the fundamental ingredients to success.”

And

“If a team is to reach its potential, each player must willingly subordinate his own personal goals to the good of the team.”

And

“We compete, not so much against an opponent, but against ourselves. The real test is this: Did I make my best effort on every play?”

And

“I feel more strongly about this than anything else in coaching: Anybody who lacks discipline, who doesn’t want to be part of the team, who doesn’t want to meet the requirements – has to go. It’s that simple.”

And

“The man who tried his best and failed is superior to the man who never tried.”

And

“Losing is easy. It’s not enjoyable, but it’s easy.”

And

“If you are going to be a champion, you must be willing to pay a greater price.”

Wikipedia:  Bud Wilkinson

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 18, 2019 – Steve Sabol

SteveSabol778

SteveSabol28282

“Life is great. Football is better.”

And

“The autumn wind is a pirate. Blustering in from sea with a rollicking song he sweeps along swaggering boisterously. His face is weather beaten, he wears a hooded sash with a silver hat about his head… The autumn wind is a Raider, pillaging just for fun.”

And

“I think in the NFL knowledge is power, and you try to get the knowledge by whatever means.”

And

“A perfect record does not mean that someone is the greatest. Rocky Marciano never lost a fight, but I never hear anyone say he’s the greatest heavyweight champion of all time.”

And

“I never thought of what I was doing as a way to sell the NFL. I was making movies about a sport that I loved, about players and coaches that I respected. I wanted to convey my love of the game through film. And most artists convey their love through art. And my art and my love was expressed through film.”

And

“Lombardi, a certain magic still lingers in the very name. It speaks of duels in the snow and November mud… He remains for many the heart of pro football, pumping hard right now.”

And

“Look at a football field. It looks like a big movie screen. This is theatre. Football combines the strategy of chess. It’s part ballet. It’s part battleground, part playground. We clarify, amplify and glorify the game with our footage, the narration and that music, and in the end create an inspirational piece of footage.”

And

“I’ve always been fascinated by Picasso and how he would look at a single image through multiple perspectives and from separate moments in time. He would look at a woman’s face and he would see almost a three-dimensional look even though it was a flat canvas. I thought, well why couldn’t we do the same thing with a football play?”

And

“When my father bid $5,000 for the 1962 Championship Game, that was a huge amount. It was double the bid the year before. Pete Rozelle was flabbergasted. Who was this guy who was willing to spend so much money on what seemed like relatively worthless rights to the NFL Championship Game?”

And

“If there’s one thing I can’t stand, it’s not being noticed.”

And

“I remember when we were making ‘They Call It Pro Football,’ which was our ‘Citizen Kane.’ The first line is ‘It starts with a whistle and ends with a gun.'”

And

“If you can show something as complicated as two people falling in love with just music and camera angles, well, just think about what you can do with football.”

And

“Football is a sport of emotions, and we have to capture that in our films.”

And

“I’ve been very lucky in the freedom that I’ve been given. Every artist needs two types of freedom: You need the freedom to – the freedom to come up with an idea or treatment – and then you need the other half of the freedom, and that’s freedom from – somebody saying, ‘This is great. This is how I want you to do it.'”

And

“NFL Films has had one continuous, creative vision for 47 years. These are timeless things; timeless stories that we capture just like people go back and read Greek mythology.”

And

“You know how I came up with the name ‘Road to the Super Bowl?’ It’s an homage to the old Bob Hope – Bing Crosby buddy movies – you know, like ‘Road to Zanzibar’ or ‘Road to Morocco.’ Can you tell? All I’ve done my whole life is go to movies.”

And

“So they talk about heaven, and I don’t know what is waiting for me up there. But I can tell you this: Nothing will happen up there that can duplicate my life down here. Nothing. That life cannot be better than the one I’ve lived down here, the football life. It’s been perfect.”

And

“To me, football is very personal. Even as a kid, I looked at football in dramaturgical terms. It wasn’t the score that interested me, it was the struggle.”

And

“I’ve always believed in that famous quote from Karl Marx, something like; ‘Men make history, but not under conditions of their own choosing.”

And

“The pressure is suffocating down there; there’s no air to breathe. You make a mistake or come up just short in the Super Bowl, and it feels like the end of the world.”

And

Wikipedia:  Steve Sabol

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, 17, 2019 – Neil Armstrong

NeilArmstrong777

“I believe every human has a finite number of heartbeats. I don’t intend to waste any of mine.”

And

“I guess we all like to be recognized not for one piece of fireworks, but for the ledger of our daily work.”

And

“It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

And

“I think we’re going to the moon because it’s in the nature of the human being to face challenges. It’s by the nature of his deep inner soul… we’re required to do these things just as salmon swim upstream.”

And

“The important achievement of Apollo was demonstrating that humanity is not forever chained to this planet and our visions go rather further than that and our opportunities are unlimited.”

And

“This is one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

And

“Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed.”

And

“As a boy, because I was born and raised in Ohio, about 60 miles north of Dayton, the legends of the Wrights have been in my memories as long as I can remember.”

And

“There can be no great accomplishment without risk.”

Wikipedia: Neil Armstrong

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, June 16, 2019 – Jack Nicklaus


“If I had only one more round to play, I would choose to play it at Pebble Beach. I’ve loved this course from the first time I saw it. It’s possibly the best in the world.”

And

“A kid grows up a lot faster on the golf course. Golf teaches you how to behave.”

And

“Concentration is a fine antidote to anxiety.”

And

“Confidence is the most important single factor in this game, and no matter how great your natural talent, there is only one way to obtain and sustain it: work.”

And

“Don’t be too proud to take lessons. I’m not.”

And

“Focus on remedies, not faults.”

And

“How people keep correcting us when we are young! There is always some bad habit or other they tell us we ought to get over. Yet most bad habits are tools to help us
through life.”

And

“I like trying to win. That’s what golf is all about. “

And

“I’m a firm believer that in the theory that people only do their best at things they truly enjoy. It is difficult to excel at something you don’t enjoy.”

And

“My ability to concentrate and work toward that goal has been my greatest asset.”

And

“Professional golf is the only sport where, if you win 20% of the time, you’re the best.”

And

“Resolve never to quit, never to give up, no matter what the situation.”

And

“Sometimes the biggest problem is in your head. You’ve got to believe you can play a shot instead of wondering where your next bad shot is coming from.”

And

“Success depends almost entirely on how effectively you learn to manage the game’s two ultimate adversaries: the course and yourself.”

And

“The game of golf is meant to be fun.”

And

“The two things that motivate me most are closely allied. They are failure and a desire for self-improvement.

By failure, I don’t necessarily mean getting beat, although that’s often the end result and in itself is a strong motivation to go to work. The kind of failing I’m talking about is failing to measure up to the standards I’ve set for myself personally. When that happens, I get an irresistible urge – almost a compulsion – to improve.
Whatever effort is necessary to prevent another failure, I just have to make it. Like now. Today.

Frankly, I believe this, more than anything else, is the reason I am where I am today. I’m not an easily satisfied person. Sure I take a lot of satisfaction in what I’ve achieved. But life doesn’t stand still. Every satisfaction wanes after a while, so if you’re like me you don’t sit around looking backwards. You try to move on, to look for something that gives you another satisfaction and, at the same time, hopefully adds a little more to your life.”Jack Nicklaus, Jack Nicklaus’ Playing Lessons, Chapter 1

And

“I never hit a shot, not even in practice, without having a very sharp, in-focus picture of it in my head. First I see the ball where I want it to finish, nice and white and sitting up high on the bright green grass. Then the scene quickly changes, and I see the ball going there: its path, trajectory, and shape, even its behavior on landing. Then there is a sort of fade-out, and the next scene shows me making the kind of swing that will turn the previous images into reality.”

And

“I like trying to win. That’s what golf is all about.”

And

Arnold Palmer, in 1962, after losing the U.S. Open to 22-year-old Nicklaus in a playoff: “Now that the big guy’s out of the cage, everybody better run for cover.”

And

Bobby Jones after watching Nicklaus win the 1965 Masters: “Nicklaus played a game with which I am not familiar.”

And

Author Rick Reilly: “He was not homespun like Sam Snead, funny like Lee Trevino. His pants didn’t need hitching like Palmer’s. Instead, he won over America with
pure, unbleached excellence.”

And

Chi Chi Rodriguez: “Jack Nicklaus is a legend in his spare time.”

And

Gene Sarazen: “I never thought anyone would ever put Hogan in the shadows, but he did.”

And

Tom Weiskopf: “Jack knew he was going to beat you. You knew Jack was going to beat you. And Jack knew that you knew that he was going to beat you.”

Wikipedia:  Jack Nicklaus

(more…)