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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, July 12, 2016 – Mike Slive

 

MikeSlive1

The below is from May 2015 on Mike Slive

Over the last few months we have been giving a lot of thought to Mike Slive’s retirement from commissioner of the SEC Conference and Mike’s remarkable run with the SEC over the past 13 years, and there really isn’t a lot we could say in this space that hasn’t been said by lots of people already including the below piece by Tony Barnhart on Mike Slive that is a brilliantly written piece about a brilliant man.

A few years back several Coaches Hot Seat members were invited to a retirement party slash roast of a well-known tech executive who was being sent out in style at a lavish dinner and party at one of San Francisco’s finest hotels. The party and roasting lived up to our expectations as this very fine man retiring after forty years working at the highest levels of technology in Silicon Valley was getting the send-off that he rightly deserved meaning he was being praised and ribbed hard as he was walking out the door.

Everyone in the room that night was very excited to see what the last speaker of the night was going to say about the retiring honoree because that speaker had been in a multi-decade business battle with the well-known retiring tech executive, and there had been some bad blood along the way so the likelihood of some great lines was high and the speaker did not disappoint as he got off some zingers that we can’t even repeat in the Coaches Hot Seat Blog which is saying something!

After about 10 minutes of the last speaker giving it to the honored retiree good the speaker then went silent after he got off a great laugh line and didn’t say anything for what seemed like an eternity, but was only 30 seconds or so. The speaker then looked across the entire audience and then down the dais at the retiring executive and said to a hushed crowd:

“I would like to finish by saying that certainly “X” and I have had our disagreements over the years and I have cussed his ass out in private more times than I can count, but for anyone that doesn’t know it already let me make this abundantly clear. Not only has “X” been a Helluva competitor and terrific businessman over the years, but the world is a better place today because of the life this very fine man has lived and for that I Thank You “X” and wish you the very best of luck in the future.”
Of course, the audience that night rose to their feet to applaud that very accurate statement about “X” which was said in the most heartfelt way possible by a man everyone in that room respected to the utmost.

To Mike Slive from the 117 142 Members of Coaches Hot Seat:

The world is a better place today because of the life you have lived over the years and for that we Thank You and wish you the very best of luck in the future.

Thank You Mike Slive and hopefully one of us will make it to Hoover, Alabama in July and tell you that in person.

MikeSlive8899

“The hostile atmospheres when you play on the road in this league are incomparable. If you can go through that [undefeated] and win this game, you deserve to be in the national championship game.”

And

“We really don’t have any concern about that. One thing this tragedy taught us is that we all need to be flexible.”

And

“The conference didn’t have to take any action of any kind,”

And

“Coaches develop relationships with these students, and if they come to believe in them as people, not just athletes, they want to give them the benefit of the doubt if they can. Not all of them make it. We know that. But we have given them the opportunity.”

And

“After reviewing all of the information, I felt this was the best decision for the game, … The safety of our student-athletes, coaches and fans is our priority.”

And

“One of the great things about the Southeastern Conference is our fans and our support — the importance of college football. On occasion that exuberance goes over the top. What we’d ultimately like to do is channel it on the field.”

And

“Hurricane Katrina has devastated the lives of victims in four of the SEC’s states, Alabama, Florida, Louisiana and Mississippi, and may continue to do so for months and years to come,”

And

“The MVP program will raise awareness about issues that can adversely affect our student athletes. It is important for the SEC to be aware of the challenges facing our student-athletes so that we can assist them whenever possible.”

And

“Coach Vaught certainly was one of the great icons in SEC football. If you look at the list of names (of) great all-Americans from here that played for him … you just get a sense of what he’s meant to this conference.”

And

“We’ll evaluate everybody. But in terms of the work ethic and the commitment of our officials, I think it’s very strong.”

And

“I used to go to more games than I do now. Every game you see in person you probably miss somewhere between five and 10 games.”

And

“Right now, there is peace in the valley. We hope to keep it that way for a little while.”

And

“No one person, no matter how popular, can be allowed to derail the soul of an institution.”

And

Tony Barnhart on Mike Slive, SEC Sports, October 2014

“The first time I talked to Mike Slive was in a ballroom of the Hyatt-Regency Hotel in Atlanta. The year was 2002 and the event was a reception to honor Roy Kramer, who in March had announced that he was stepping down as commissioner of the SEC after an ultra-successful 12-year reign.

Among the invited guests was the diminutive, silver-haired former circuit court judge who was then serving as commissioner of Conference USA. I saw Slive and his wife, Liz, from across the room and made a mental note to say hello before the night was over.

“You probably need to do that,” said a friend of mine who worked at an SEC school. “I’m pretty sure he’s going to be your new commissioner.”

My first reaction to this news? I knew Slive was from the North (Utica, N.Y.) with an Ivy League background (Darmouth College). I knew he had hung out a shingle after U.Va. Law School and had worked in administration with the Pac-10 before becoming a commissioner. But that’s all I knew. And as someone who grew up in the SEC and had been covering the conference as a reporter for almost two decades, I didn’t see any way this guy could replace Roy Kramer.

Kramer was a former coach (he won a Division II national championship at Central Michigan), a former director of athletics (Vanderbilt), and one of the most brilliant men I’ve ever met. And he was tough. The football coaches listened to Kramer even when they didn’t agree with him because he had been one of them. The presidents and the athletics directors listened to Kramer because from Day 1 he was looking 10 years down the road and could see it very clearly.

I just didn’t know if someone with Slive’s background would have the gravitas to wrangle the collection of powerful people with egos to match that was the SEC at the beginning of the 21st century.

We had a short, cordial visit. I didn’t bring up what I had heard. It wasn’t the time because we were there to honor Commissioner Kramer. But his smile and his handshake let me know that we’d be seeing each other soon enough.

On July 2, 2002 Mike Slive was introduced as the seventh commissioner of the Southeastern Conference. After the formal press conference at the SEC offices in Birmingham he met with a smaller group of reporters in a conference room. From the minute he sat down Mike Slive was comfortably in charge of the room. His words were thoughtful and measured. Like a good lawyer he had anticipated the questions and had his answers ready.

He knew that there would be a learning curve to the job but was confident he could handle it. He knew that he had just been handed the keys to one of most powerful vehicles in the world of college athletics.

But he also knew that his job not to be a caretaker. Mike Slive realized that his challenge was to take the world-class franchise that Roy Kramer had helped to build and to make it into something even better. I left Birmingham that day with no doubt that he would be a great commissioner.

That was the first memory that raced back to me on Tuesday when Commissioner Slive announced that he would retire on July 31, 2015. He will remain on as a consultant for four years. In a brilliant 13-year run he has:

**–Turned the SEC from a strong regional brand into powerful national brand with long-term television contracts and the creation of the SEC Network, which launched on Aug. 14.

**–Presided over what was nothing less than the Golden Age of SEC football, with seven consecutive BCS championships from 2006-2012. Auburn was 13 seconds short of making it eight straight back in January.

**–Added two strong institutions-Texas A&M and Missouri-to an already strong conference.

**–Maintained an across-the-board commitment to all 21 sponsored sports, which have recorded a staggering 75 national championships during his tenure.

**–Introduced the proposal that would eventually become the four-team College Football Playoff, which begins his season.

**–Spearheaded the movement to give the Power Five conferences greater autonomy in the NCAA governance structure.

**–Through the force of his leadership, increased the SEC’s commitment to diversity. He created the SEC Minority Coaches Database. He made sure everybody in the conference understood that the SEC was not going to pay lip service to diversity. The SEC was going to live it. In 2011 Kentucky played Vanderbilt in the league’s first-ever meeting of African-American head football coaches. It wasn’t a big story. To Slive, that was a good thing.

**–Launched the SEC Academic Initiative, which used the power of the athletics brand to highlight and advance the great accomplishments of the members on the academic front.

The list of Slive’s accomplishments as commissioner goes on and on. But what I really want to share with you today is not what Mike Slive did but the way in which he did it.

He has been the ultimate consensus builder. Like the good lawyer who never asks a question to which he doesn’t already know the answer, Commissioner Slive would make sure he had the votes lined up before the meeting ever took place. And no matter what the vote actually was, it would be unanimous when Slive walked out of the room.

He has always understood the importance of strong coaches, but those coaches always understood who was in charge. In 2009 a number of the SEC football coaches had been sniping at each other in public. At the SEC Spring Meetings in Destin Slive walked into the room and read his coaches the riot act. Problem solved.

“I’d say the commissioner made his point,” Steve Spurrier told me after the meeting.

When Slive took over as commissioner he made it clear that he would have zero tolerance for schools that knowingly broke NCAA rules. The rules were also changed so that if one member had a problem with another member in the area of rules compliance, that complaint would first go through the SEC office.

When Auburn was left out of the BCS championship game with a 13-0 record in 2004, the commissioner started putting together the idea for the four-team college football playoff. Slive’s original version was called a “Plus-One” and he presented the idea to his fellow BCS commissioners during a meeting in South Florida in April of 2008. Only one other commissioner, the ACC’s John Swofford, supported it.

Slive’s idea was shot down and he was clearly disappointed when we talked in a hallway outside the meeting room. I asked the commissioner if he actually floated the idea just to set the table for 2012, when the current BCS deal was scheduled to end.

He just smiled.

In 2008 Slive knew his fellow commissioners weren’t ready to make the change. He was betting that four years later they would be ready. And he was right. When two SEC teams-LSU and Alabama-played for the 2011 BCS championship the commissioners came around to Slive’s way of thinking.

His work ethic is legendary. If you’re on Mike Slive’s staff, be prepared for 6:30 a.m. meetings at Starbucks. George Schroeder of USA Today wrote a wonderful piece on the commissioner last summer.

The Quiet Man:  Mike Slive’s placid approach to SEC power, George Schroeder, USA Today

In that piece Schroeder quotes Slive’s daughter, Anna, on his ability, at age 74, to still outwork men half his age.

“He only has two speeds,” she told Schroeder. “High and off.”

In the interest of full disclosure, I need to point out here that I’ve been fortunate to have a close personal and professional relationship with Commissioner Slive. I have used him as a sounding board when I have had to make some tough career decisions.

Each year, on the day before the Spring Meetings begin in Destin, we sit down for about an hour and reflect on where the conference has been and where it is going. Those conversations invariably turn personal and every year I ask how much longer he wants to go at this pace. Last May he just said: “You’ll see me until you don’t see me.”

In June of 2012 he became a grandfather for the first time. In August of 2012 I became a grandfather. And every meeting we’ve had since begins with the sharing of photos-his of Abigail and mine of Sloane.

That’s what I was thinking about when Commissioner Slive announced that he would retire next July. Because at the end of the day it’s really not about the money you make or the power you accumulate or the championships you win. It’s about the lives you have touched.

Mike and Liz Slive have touched a lot of lives in their time at the SEC. Lucky for us, they will do so for many years to come.”

Wikipedia:  Mike Slive

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, July 11, 2016 – Alexis de Tocqueville

 

AlexisDemocracy111

“In the United States the majority undertakes to supply a multitude of ready-made opinions for the use of individuals, who are thus relieved from the necessity of forming opinions of their own”

And

“In politics… shared hatreds are almost always the basis of friendships.”

And

“I cannot help fearing that men may reach a point where they look on every new theory as a danger, every innovation as a toilsome trouble, every social advance as a first step toward revolution, and that they may absolutely refuse to move at all.”

And

“There are many men of principle in both parties in America, but there is no party of principle.”

And

“Born often under another sky, placed in the middle of an always moving scene, himself driven by the irresistible torrent which draws all about him, the American has no time to tie himself to anything, he grows accustomed only to change, and ends by regarding it as the natural state of man. He feels the need of it, more he loves it; for the instability; instead of meaning disaster to him, seems to give birth only to miracles all about him.”

And

“As one digs deeper into the national character of the Americans, one sees that they have sought the value of everything in this world only in the answer to this single question: how much money will it bring in?”

And

“As for me, I am deeply a democrat; this is why I am in no way a socialist. Democracy and socialism cannot go together. You can’t have it both ways.”

And

“Democracy extends the sphere of individual freedom, socialism restricts it. Democracy attaches all possible value to each man; socialism makes each man a mere agent, a mere number. Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude.”

And

“Equality is a slogan based on envy. It signifies in the heart of every republican: “Nobody is going to occupy a place higher than I.””

And

“History, it is easily perceived, is a picture-gallery containing a host of copies and very few originals.”

And

“He who seeks freedom for anything but freedom’s self is made to be a slave.”

And

“God does not need to speak for himself in order for us to discover definitive signs of his will; it is enough to examine the normal course of nature and the consistent tendency of events. I know without needing to hear the voice of the Creator that the stars trace out in space the orbits which his hand has drawn.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“I know of no country, indeed, where the love of money has taken stronger hold on the affections of men, and where the profounder contempt is expressed for the theory of the permanent equality of property.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“There is in fact a manly and legitimate passion for equality that spurs all men to wish to be strong and esteemed. This passion tends to elevate the lesser to the rank of the greater. But one also finds in the human heart a depraved taste for equality, which impels the weak to want to bring the strong down to their level, and which reduces men to preferring equality in servitude to inequality in freedom.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“The will of the nation” is one of those expressions which have been most profusely abused by the wily and the despotic of every age.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“In order to enjoy the inestimable benefits that the liberty of the press ensures, it is necessary to submit to the inevitable evils it creates.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“A democratic government is the only one in which those who vote for a tax can escape the obligation to pay it.”
Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“The greatness of America lies not in being more enlightened than any other nation, but rather in her ability to repair her faults.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“An American cannot converse, but he can discuss, and his talk falls into a dissertation. He speaks to you as if he was addressing a meeting; and if he should chance to become warm in the discussion, he will say “Gentlemen” to the person with whom he is conversing.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“What is not yet done is only what we have not yet attempted to do.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“The whole life of an American is passed like a game of chance, a revolutionary crisis, or a battle.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“In the United States a man builds a house to spend his latter years in it and he sells it before the roof is on. He plants a garden and lets it just as the trees are coming into bearing. He brings a field into tillage and leaves other men to gather the crops. He embraces a profession and gives it up. He settles in a place which he soon afterward leaves to carry his changeable longings elsewhere. If his private affairs leave him any leisure he instantly plunges into the vortex of politics and if at the end of a year of unremitting labour he finds he has a few days’ vacation, his eager curiosity whirls him over the vast extent of the United States, and he will travel fifteen hundred miles in a few days to shake off his happiness.”  Democracy in America, Volume 1, 1835

And

“In the United States, the majority undertakes to supply a multitude of ready-made opinions for the use of individuals, who are thus relieved from the necessity of forming opinions of their own.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

Amd

“There is hardly a pioneer’s hut which does not contain a few odd volumes of Shakespeare. I remember reading the feudal drama of Henry V for the first time in a log cabin.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“The genius of democracies is seen not only in the great number of new words introduced but even more in the new ideas they express.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“Americans of all ages, all stations of life, and all types of disposition are forever forming associations… In democratic countries knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the others.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“What most astonishes me in the United States, is not so much the marvelous grandeur of some undertakings, as the innumerable multitude of small ones.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“In democratic ages men rarely sacrifice themselves for another, but they show a general compassion for all the human race. One never sees them inflict pointless suffering, and they are glad to relieve the sorrows of others when they can do so without much trouble to themselves. They are not disinterested, but they are gentle.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“I have no hesitation in saying that although the American woman never leaves her domestic sphere and is in some respects very dependent within it, nowhere does she enjoy a higher station. And if anyone asks me what I think the chief cause of the extraordinary prosperity and growing power of this nation, I should answer that it is due to the superiority of their women.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“Consider any individual at any period of his life, and you will always find him preoccupied with fresh plans to increase his comfort.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“In no other country in the world is the love of property keener or more alert than in the United States, and nowhere else does the majority display less inclination toward doctrines which in any way threaten the way property is owned.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“Two things in America are astonishing: the changeableness of most human behavior and the strange stability of certain principles. Men are constantly on the move, but the spirit of humanity seems almost unmoved.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“There are two things which a democratic people will always find very difficult—to begin a war and to end it.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“No protracted war can fail to endanger the freedom of a democratic country.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“All those who seek to destroy the liberties of a democratic nation ought to know that war is the surest and shortest means to accomplish it.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“I should have loved freedom, I believe, at all times, but in the time in which we live I am ready to worship it.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“When the past no longer illuminates the future, the spirit walks in darkness.”  Democracy in America, Volume 2, 1840

And

“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.”

Wikipedia:  Alexis de Tocqueville

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, July 10, 2016 – Jack London

 

JackLondon777

“I do not live for what the world thinks of me, but for what I think of myself.”

And

“There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.”

And

“The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances.”

And

“I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.”

And

“Life is not always a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well.”

And

“There are things greater than our wisdom, beyond our justice. The right and wrong of this we cannot say, and it is not for us to judge.”

And

“He lacked the wisdom, and the only way for him to get it was to buy it with his youth; and when wisdom was his, youth would have been spent buying it”

And

“San Francisco is gone. Nothing remains of it but memories.”

And

“If cash comes with fame, come fame; if cash comes without fame, come cash.”

And

“You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”

And

“Fiction pays best of all and when it is of fair quality is more easily sold. A good joke will sell quicker than a good poem, and, measured in sweat and blood, will bring better remuneration. Avoid the unhappy ending, the harsh, the brutal, the tragic, the horrible – if you care to see in print things you write. (In this connection don’t do as I do, but do as I say.) Humour is the hardest to write, easiest to sell, and best rewarded… Don’t write too much. Concentrate your sweat on one story, rather than dissipate it over a dozen. Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will nonetheless get something that looks remarkably like it.”

And

“A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.”

And

“Affluence means influence.”

And

“Darn the wheel of the world! Why must it continually turn over? Where is the reverse gear?”

Wikipedia: Jack London

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, July 9, 2016 – Niccolo Machiavelli

 

NiccoMach788

“Never was anything great achieved without danger.”

And

“The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him.”

And

“The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.”

And

“There are three kinds of intelligence: one kind understands things for itself, the other appreciates what others can understand, the third understands neither for itself nor through others. This first kind is excellent, the second good, and the third kind useless.”

And

“There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.”

And

“Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.”

And

“The Romans never allowed a trouble spot to remain simply to avoid going to war over it, because they knew that wars don’t just go away, they are only postponed to someone else’s advantage.”

And

“Where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be great.”

And

“Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.”

And

“The chief foundations of all states, new as well as old or composite, are good laws and good arms; and as there cannot be good laws where the state is not well armed, it follows that where they are well armed they have good laws.”

And

“From this arises the question whether it is better to be loved rather than feared, or feared rather than loved. It might perhaps be answered that we should wish to be both: but since love and fear can hardly exist together, if we must choose between them, it is far safer to be feared than loved.”

And

“God is not willing to do everything, and thus take away our free will and that share of glory which belongs to us.”

And

“It is truly a marvelous thing to consider to what greatness Athens arrived in the space of one hundred years after she freed herself from the tyranny of Pisistratus; but, above all, it is even more marvelous to consider the greatness Rome reached when she freed herself from her kings. The reason is easy to understand, for it is the common good and not private gain that makes cities great. Yet, without a doubt, this common good is observed only in republics, for in them everything that promotes it is practised, and however much damage it does to this or that private individual, those who benefit from the said common good are so numerous that they are able to advance in spite of the inclination of the few citizens who are oppressed by it.”

And

“It is not titles that make men illustrious, but men who make titles illustrious.”

And

“Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.”

And

“The Romans never allowed a trouble spot to remain simply to avoid going to war over it, because they knew that wars don’t just go away, they are only postponed to someone else’s advantage. Therefore, they made war with Philip and Antiochus in Greece, in order not to have to fight them in Italy… They never went by that saying which you constantly hear from the wiseacres of our day, that time heals all things. They trusted rather their own character and prudence— knowing perfectly well that time contains the seeds of all things, good as well as bad.”

And

“It ought to be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things. Because the innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may do well under the new. This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them.”

And

“The prince must consider, as has been in part said before, how to avoid those things which will make him hated or contemptible; and as often as he shall have succeeded he will have fulfilled his part, and he need not fear any danger in other reproaches. It makes him hated above all things, as I have said, to be rapacious, and to be a violator of the property and women of his subjects, from both of which he must abstain. And when neither their property nor honour is touched, the majority of men live content, and he has only to contend with the ambition of a few, whom he can curb with ease in many ways. It makes him contemptible to be considered fickle, frivolous, effeminate, mean-spirited, irresolute, from all of which a prince should guard himself as from a rock; and he should endeavour to show in his actions greatness, courage, gravity, and fortitude; and in his private dealings with his subjects let him show that his judgments are irrevocable, and maintain himself in such reputation that no one can hope either to deceive him or to get round him. That prince is highly esteemed who conveys this impression of himself, and he who is highly esteemed is not easily conspired against; for, provided it is well known that he is an excellent man and revered by his people, he can only be attacked with difficulty.”

And

“The best fortress which a prince can possess is the affection of his people.”

And

“There is no other way of guarding oneself against flattery than by letting men understand that they will not offend you by speaking the truth; but when everyone can tell you the truth, you lose their respect.”

And

“It was the verdict of ancient writers that men afflict themselves in evil and weary themselves in the good, and that the same effects result from both of these passions. For whenever men are not obliged to fight from necessity, they fight from ambition; which is so powerful in human breasts, that it never leaves them no matter to what rank they rise. The reason is that nature has so created men that they are able to desire everything but are not able to attain everything: so that the desire being always greater than the acquisition, there results discontent with the possession and little satisfaction to themselves from it. From this arises the changes in their fortunes; for as men desire, some to have more, some in fear of losing their acquisition, there ensues enmity and war, from which results the ruin of that province and the elevation of another.”

And

“It is truly a marvelous thing to consider to what greatness Athens arrived in the space of one hundred years after she freed herself from the tyranny of Pisistratus; but, above all, it is even more marvelous to consider the greatness Rome reached when she freed herself from her kings. The reason is easy to understand, for it is the common good and not private gain that makes cities great. Yet, without a doubt, this common good is observed only in republics, for in them everything that promotes it is practised, and however much damage it does to this or that private individual, those who benefit from the said common good are so numerous that they are able to advance in spite of the inclination of the few citizens who are oppressed by it.”

And

“No proceeding is better than that which you have concealed from the enemy until the time you have executed it. To know how to recognize an opportunity in war, and take it, benefits you more than anything else. Nature creates few men brave, industry and training makes many. Discipline in war counts more than fury.”

Wikipedia: Niccolo Machiavelli

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, July 8, 2016 – Joseph Campbell

 

JosephCampbell37288

“A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.”

And

“Find a place inside where there’s joy, and the joy will burn out the pain.”

And

“Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.”

And

“I don’t believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.”

And

“Is the system going to flatten you out and deny you your humanity, or are you going to be able to make use of the system to the attainment of human purposes?”

And

“It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life. Where you stumble, there lies your treasure.”

And

“Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning.”

And

“Opportunities to find deeper powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging.”

And

“The big question is whether you are going to be able to say a hearty yes to your adventure.”

And

“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature.”

And

“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.”

And

“We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us.”

And

“When we quit thinking primarily about ourselves and our own self-preservation, we undergo a truly heroic transformation of consciousness.”

And

“When you make the sacrifice in marriage, you’re sacrificing not to each other but to unity in a relationship.”

And

“Your life is the fruit of your own doing. You have no one to blame but yourself.”

And

“Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.”

And

“It’s only when a man tames his own demons that he becomes the king of himself if not of the world.”

And

“The achievement of the hero is one that he is ready for and it’s really a manifestation of his character.”

And

“People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonance within our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive. That’s what it’s all finally about.”

And

“One thing that comes out in myths is that at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light.”

And

“The way to find out about your happiness is to keep your mind on those moments when you feel most happy, when you really are happy-not excited, not just thrilled, but deeply happy. This requires a little bit of self analysis. What is it that makes you happy? Stay with it, no matter what people tell you. This is what I call “following your bliss.”

And

“The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read, not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man. …Tragedy is the shattering of the forms and of our attachment to the forms… the two are the terms of a single mythological theme… the down-going and the up-coming (kathados and anodos), which together constitute the totality of the revelation that is life, and which the individual must know and love if he is to be purged (katharsis=purgatorio) of the contagion of sin (disobedience to the divine will) and death (identification with the mortal form). “All things are changing; nothing dies…”

And

“Eternity isn’t some later time. Eternity isn’t a long time. Eternity has nothing to do with time. Eternity is that dimension of here and now which thinking and time cuts out. This is it. And if you don’t get it here, you won’t get it anywhere. And the experience of eternity right here and now is the function of life. There’s a wonderful formula that the Buddhists have for the Bodhisattva, the one whose being (sattva) is illumination (bodhi), who realizes his identity with eternity and at the same time his participation in time. And the attitude is not to withdraw from the world when you realize how horrible it is, but to realize that this horror is simply the foreground of a wonder and to come back and participate in it. “All life is sorrowful” is the first Buddhist saying, and it is. It wouldn’t be life if there were not temporality involved which is sorrow. Loss, loss, loss.”

And

“Follow your bliss.”

And

“Bill Moyers: Unlike heroes such as Prometheus or Jesus, we’re not going on our journey to save the world but to save ourselves.
Joseph Campbell: But in doing that you save the world. The influence of a vital person vitalizes, there’s no doubt about it. The world without spirit is a wasteland. People have the notion of saving the world by shifting things around, changing the rules, and who’s on top, and so forth. No, no! Any world is a valid world if it’s alive. The thing to do is to bring life to it, and the only way to do that is to find in your own case where the life is and become alive yourself.”

And

“Marx teaches us to blame society for our frailties, Freud teaches us to blame our parents, and astrology teaches us to blame the universe. The only place to look for blame is within: you didn’t have the guts to bring up your full moon and live the life that was your potential.”

Wikipedia:  Joseph Campbell

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, July 7, 2016 – Jim Lovell

 

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“Be thankful for problems. If they were less difficult, someone with less ability might have your job.”

And

“Houston, we’ve had a problem here.”

And

“The moon is essentially gray, no color. It looks like plaster of Paris, like dirty beach sand with lots of footprints in it.”

And

“There are people who make things happen, there are people who watch things happen, and there are people who wonder what happened. To be successful, you need to be a person who makes things happen.”

And

“From now on, we live in a world where man has walked on the moon. It wasn’t a miracle, we just decided to go.”

Wikipedia:  Jim Lovell

 

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, July 6, 2016 – Neil Armstrong

 

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“I believe every human has a finite number of heartbeats. I don’t intend to waste any of mine.”

And

“I guess we all like to be recognized not for one piece of fireworks, but for the ledger of our daily work.”

And

“It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

And

“I think we’re going to the moon because it’s in the nature of the human being to face challenges. It’s by the nature of his deep inner soul… we’re required to do these things just as salmon swim upstream.”

And

“The important achievement of Apollo was demonstrating that humanity is not forever chained to this planet and our visions go rather further than that and our opportunities are unlimited.”

And

“This is one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

And

“Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed.”

And

“As a boy, because I was born and raised in Ohio, about 60 miles north of Dayton, the legends of the Wrights have been in my memories as long as I can remember.”

And

“There can be no great accomplishment without risk.”

Wikipedia: Neil Armstrong

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, July 5, 2016 – Frederick Douglass

 

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“A man’s character always takes its hue, more or less, from the form and color of things about him.”

And

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”

And

“Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.”

And

“I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence.”

And

“I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress.”

And

“A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.”

And

“One and God make a majority.”

And

“I didn’t know I was a slave until I found out I couldn’t do the things I wanted.”

And

“The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppose.”

And

“A gentleman will not insult me, and no man not a gentleman can insult me.”

And

“To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker.”

And

“The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous.”

And

“A little learning, indeed, may be a dangerous thing, but the want of learning is a calamity to any people.”

And

“The white man’s happiness cannot be purchased by the black man’s misery.”

And

“Without a struggle, there can be no progress.”

And

“It is not light that we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.”

And

“Man’s greatness consists in his ability to do and the proper application of his powers to things needed to be done.”

And

“People might not get all they work for in this world, but they must certainly work for all they get.”

And

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral one; or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what a people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. Men may not get all they pay for in this world; but they must pay for all they get. If we ever get free from all the oppressions and wrongs heaped upon us, we must pay for their removal. We must do this by labor, by suffering, by sacrifice, and, if needs be, by our lives, and the lives of others.”

And

“No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck.”

And

“Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.”

And

“Whatever the future may have in store for us, one thing is certain — this new revolution in human thought will never go backward. When a great truth once gets abroad in the world, no power on earth can imprison it, or prescribe its limits, or suppress it. It is bound to go on till it becomes the thought of the world. Such a truth is woman’s right to equal liberty with man. She was born with it. It was hers before she comprehended it. It is inscribed upon all the powers and faculties of her soul, and no custom, law, or usage can ever destroy it. Now that it has got fairly fixed in the minds of the few, it is bound to become fixed in the minds of the many, and be supported at last by a great cloud of witnesses, which no man can number and no power can withstand.”

And

“Mr. Lincoln was not only a great President, but a great man — too great to be small in anything. In his company I was never in any way reminded of my humble origin, or of my unpopular color.”

And

“I look upon my departure from Colonel Lloyd’s plantation as one of the most interesting events of my life. It is possible, and even quite probable, that but for the mere circumstance of being removed from that plantation to Baltimore, I should have to-day, instead of being here seated by my own table, in the enjoyment of freedom and the happiness of home, writing this Narrative, been confined in the galling chains of slavery. Going to live at Baltimore laid the foundation, and opened the gateway, to all my subsequent prosperity. I have ever regarded it as the first plain manifestation of that kind providence which has ever since attended me, and marked my life with so many favors. I regarded the selection of myself as being somewhat remarkable. There were a number of slave children that might have been sent from the plantation to Baltimore. There were those younger, those older, and those of the same age. I was chosen from among them all, and was the first, last, and only choice.”

Wikipedia Page: Frederick Douglass

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, July 4, 2016 – Thomas Jefferson

 

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“In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, July 4, 1776

And

“A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circlue of
our felicities.”

And

“Advertisements contain the only truths to be relied on in a newspaper.”

And

“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.”

And

“All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression.”

And

“Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.”

And

“As our enemies have found we can reason like men, so now let us show them we can fight like men also.”

And

“Be polite to all, but intimate with few.”

And

“Books constitute capital. A library book lasts as long as a house, for hundreds of years. It is not, then, an article of mere consumption but fairly of capital, and often in the case of professional men, setting out in life, it is their only capital.”

And

“Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing.”

And

“Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.”

And

“Educate and inform the whole mass of the people… They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty.”

And

“Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans, and must be that of every free state.”

And

“Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves are its only safe depositories.”

And

“Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.”

And

“Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.”

And

“For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well-organized and armed militia is their best security.”

And

“I am an Epicurean. I consider the genuine (not the imputed) doctrines of Epicurus as containing everything rational in moral philosophy which Greek and Roman leave to us.”

And

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.”

And

“I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

And

“I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be.”

And

“I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them but to inform their discretion.”

And

“I own that I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive.”

And

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”

And

“I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.”

And

“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.”

And

“In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.”

And

“It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.”

And

It is our duty still to endeavor to avoid war; but if it shall actually take place, no matter by whom brought on, we must defend ourselves. If our house be on fire, “without inquiring whether it was fired from within or without, we must try to extinguish it.”

And

“Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning.”

And

“Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.”

And

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.”

And

“Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.”

And

“Never spend your money before you have earned it.”

And

“Nothing is unchangeable but the inherent and unalienable rights of man.”

And

“Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits.”

And

“The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only object of good government.”

And

“The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them.”

And

“There is not a truth existing which I fear… or would wish unknown to the whole world.”

And

“We never repent of having eaten too little.”

And

“When a man assumes a public trust he should consider himself a public property.”

And

“When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”

And

“When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe.”

And

“Whenever a man has cast a longing eye on offices, a rottenness begins in his conduct.”

And

“Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.”

And

“Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.”

And

“The most fortunate of us, in our journey through life, frequently meet with calamities and misfortunes which may greatly afflict us; and, to fortify our minds against the attacks of these calamities and misfortunes, should be one of the principal studies and endeavours of our lives. The only method of doing this is to assume a perfect resignation to the Divine will, to consider that whatever does happen, must happen; and that by our uneasiness, we cannot prevent the blow before it does fall, but we may add to its force after it has fallen. These considerations, and others such as these, may enable us in some measure to surmount the difficulties thrown in our way; to bear up with a tolerable degree of patience under this burthen of life; and to proceed with a pious and unshaken resignation, till we arrive at our journey’s end, when we may deliver up our trust into the hands of him who gave it, and receive such reward as to him shall seem proportioned to our merit. Such, dear Page, will be the language of the man who considers his situation in this life, and such should be the language of every man who would wish to render that situation as easy as the nature of it will admit. Few things will disturb him at all: nothing will disturb him much.” Letter to John Page (15 July 1763)

And

“All persons shall have full and free liberty of religious opinion; nor shall any be compelled to frequent or maintain any religious institution.”

And

“I say, the earth belongs to each of these generations during its course, fully and in its own right. The second generation receives it clear of the debts and incumbrances of the first, the third of the second, and so on. For if the first could charge it with a debt, then the earth would belong to the dead and not to the living generation. Then, no generation can contract debts greater than may be paid during the course of its own existence.”

And

“I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground: That “all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States or to the people.” To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take
possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible of any definition.

The incorporation of a bank, and the powers assumed by this bill, have not, in my opinion, been delegated to the United States, by the Constitution… They are not among the powers specially enumerated…” Opinion against the constitutionality of a National Bank (1791)

And

“The system of banking we have both equally and ever reprobated. I contemplate it as a blot left in all our Constitutions, which, if not covered, will end in their destruction, which is already hit by the gamblers in corruption, and is sweeping away in its progress the fortunes and morals of our citizens. Funding I consider as
limited, rightfully, to a redemption of the debt within the lives of a majority of the generation contracting it; every generation coming equally, by the laws of the Creator of the world, to the free possession of the earth he made for their subsistence, unincumbered by their predecessors, who, like them, were but tenants for life.”
Letter to John Taylor (28 May 1816)

And

“A Decalogue of Canons for Observation in Practical Life”
1. Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
2. Never trouble another for what you can do yourself.
3. Never spend your money before you have it.
4. Never buy what you do not want, because it is cheap; it will be dear to you.
5. Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst and cold.
6. We never repent of having eaten too little.
7. Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly.
8. How much pain have cost us the evils which have never happened.
9. Take things always by their smooth handle.
10. When angry, count ten before you speak; if very angry, an hundred.”

Wikipedia Page:  Thomas Jefferson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, July 3, 2016 – Thomas Paine

 

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A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.

And

“Character is much easier kept than recovered.”

And

“Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.”

And

“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”

And

“I prefer peace. But if trouble must come, let it come in my time, so that my children can live in peace.”

And

“One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.”

And

“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best stage, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.”

And

“That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly.”

And

“There are two distinct classes of what are called thoughts: those that we produce in ourselves by reflection and the act of thinking and those that bolt into the mind of their own accord.”

And

“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

And

“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.”

And

“We have it in our power to begin the world over again.”

And

“We have every opportunity and every encouragement before us, to form the noblest purest constitution on the face of the earth. We have it in our power to begin the world over again. A situation, similar to the present, hath not happened since the days of Noah until now. The birthday of a new world is at hand, and a race of men, perhaps as numerous as all Europe contains, are to receive their portion of freedom from the event of a few months.” Common Sense, 1776

And

“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of man change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it.” The Rights of Man, 1791

And

“It is the nature and intention of a constitution to prevent governing by party, by establishing a common principle that shall limit and control the power and impulse of party, and that says to all parties, thus far shalt thou go and no further. But in the absence of a constitution, men look entirely to party; and instead of principle governing party, party governs principle.” First Principles of Government, 1795

And

“I never tire of reading Tom Paine.” Abraham Lincoln, as quoted in A Literary History of the American People, 1931

And

“I consider Paine our greatest political thinker. As we have not advanced, and perhaps never shall advance, beyond the Declaration and Constitution, so Paine has had no successors who extended his principles.” Thomas Alva Edison

Wikipedia: Thomas Paine

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