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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, June 7, 2020 – Joe Louis

“Every man’s got to figure to get beat sometime.”

And

“Once that bell rings you’re on your own. It’s just you and the other guy.”

And

“I made the most of my ability and I did my best with my title.”

And

“I hope they’re still making women like my momma. She always told me to do the right thing. She always told me to have pride in myself; she said a good name is better than money.”

And

“He can run, but he can’t hide.”

And

“There is no such thing as a natural boxer. A natural dancer has to practice hard. A natural painter has to paint all the time. Even a natural fool has to work at it.”

And

“Your job helps your family, and your family is forever.”

And

“You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”

And

“Yeah, I’m scared. I’m scared I might kill Schmeling.”

And

“I just give lip service to being the greatest. He was the greatest.” – Muhammad Ali

And

“(I define fear as) standing across the ring from Joe Louis and knowing he wants to go home early.” – Max Baer

And

“As soon as the bell rang, they folded like tulips.” – Ray Arcel, on Louis’ opponents

And

“He’s a credit to his race—the human race.” – Jimmy Cannon

And

“Louis is to good to be true and he is absolutely true.” – Ernest Hemingway

Wikipedia:  Joe Louis

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, June 6, 2020 – Omar Bradley

OmarB2991

“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

And

“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

And

“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

And

“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

And

“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

And

“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

And

“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

And

“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

And

“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

And

Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, June 5, 2020 – Jake Gaither

JakeGaither7711771

“I like my boys agile, mobile and hostile.”

And

”Football is a hard-nosed game. You go into it pulling no punches and asking none. Football is a character-building game—but you can build more character with a winning team than with a losing one.”

And

“Expect to lose sometimes, but a loss can be a stepping stone to victory if used properly.”

And

“The Bear can take his and beat yours and take yours and beat his.” Jake Gaither, former Florida A&M coach on Alabama’s legendary Bear Bryant

And

“Never leave the field with a boy feeling you’re mad at him. You can chew him out, but then pat him on the shoulder.”

And

“It’s bad coaching to blame your boys for losing a game, even if it’s true.”

And

“I just organize. Give me credit for selecting good assistants.”

And

“Excuses are no good. Your friends don’t need them, and your enemies won’t believe them.”

Wikipedia: Jake Gaither

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, June 4, 2020 – Johnny Cash

“You build on failure. You use it as a stepping stone. Close the door on the past. You don’t try to forget the mistakes, but you don’t dwell on it. You don’t let it have any of your energy, or any of your time, or any of your space.”

And

“I wear black because I’m comfortable in it. But then in the summertime when it’s hot I’m comfortable in light blue.”

And

“God’s the final judge for Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash too. That’s solely in the hands of God.”

And

“I read novels but I also read the Bible. And study it, you know? And the more I learn, the more excited I get.”

And

“Success is having to worry about every damn thing in the world, except money.”

And

“How well I have learned that there is no fence to sit on between heaven and hell. There is a deep, wide gulf, a chasm, and in that chasm is no place for any man.”

And

“People call me wild. Not really though, I’m not.I guess I’ve never been normal, not what you call Establishment. I’m country.”

And

“I am not a Christian artist, I am an artist who is a Christian.”

And

“Sometimes I am two people. Johnny is the nice one. Cash causes all the trouble. They fight.”

And

“The things that have always been important: to be a good man, to try to live my life the way God would have me, to turn it over to Him that His will might be worked in my life, to do my work without looking back, to give it all I’ve got, and to take pride in my work as an honest performer.”

And

“My father was a man of love. He always loved me to death. He worked hard in the fields, but my father never hit me. Never. I don’t ever remember a really cross, unkind word from my father.”

And

“I love to go to the studio and stay there 10 or 12 hours a day. I love it. What is it? I don’t know. It’s life.”

And

“Of emotions, of love, of breakup, of love and hate and death and dying, mama, apple pie, and the whole thing. It covers a lot of territory, country music does.”

And

“You’ve got to know your limitations. I don’t know what your limitations are. I found out what mine were when I was twelve. I found out that there weren’t too many limitations, if I did it my way.”

And

“You’ve got a song you’re singing from your gut, you want that audience to feel it in their gut. And you’ve got to make them think that you’re one of them sitting out there with them too. They’ve got to be able to relate to what you’re doing.”

And

“That was the big thing when I was growing up, singing on the radio. The extent of my dream was to sing on the radio station in Memphis. Even when I got out of the Air Force in 1954, I came right back to Memphis and started knocking on doors at the radio station.”

And

“You can ask the people around me. I don’t give up. I don’t give up… and it’s not out of frustration and desperation that I say I don’t give up. I don’t give up because I don’t give up. I don’t believe in it.”

And

“Be thankful for the time you have.”

And

“Johnny Cash is a two-word answer for why it’s still good to be an American.”  Rosanne Cash on her father Johnny Cash   

Wikipedia:  Johnny Cash

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – Robert Louis Stevenson

“A friend is a gift you give yourself.”

And

“All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.”

And

“An aim in life is the only fortune worth finding.”

And

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”

And

“Everyone lives by selling something.”

And

“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.”

And

“I never weary of great churches. It is my favorite kind of mountain scenery. Mankind was never so happily inspired as when it made a cathedral.”

And

“It is the mark of a good action that it appears inevitable in retrospect.”

And

“Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.”

And

“Most of our pocket wisdom is conceived for the use of mediocre people, to discourage them from ambitious attempts, and generally console them in their mediocrity.”

And

“Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation and is thought necessary.”

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“Talk is by far the most accessible of pleasures. It costs nothing in money, it is all profit, it completes our education, founds and fosters our friendships, and can be enjoyed at any age and in almost any state of health.”

And

“The world has no room for cowards.”

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“To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

And

“To become what we are capable of becoming is the only end in life.”

And

“We must accept life for what it actually is – a challenge to our quality without which we should never know of what stuff we are made, or grow to our full stature.”

And

“You cannot run away from weakness; you must some time fight it out or perish; and if that be so, why not now, and where you stand?”

And

“You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us.”

And

“So long as we love we serve; so long as we are loved by others, I would almost say that we are indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend.”

And

“The Monterey Peninsula is the greatest meeting of land and sea in the world.”

Wikipedia:  Robert Louis Stevenson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 2, 2020 – Johnny Unitas

“There is a difference between conceit and confidence. Conceit is bragging about yourself. Confidence means you believe you can get the job done.”

And

“I always thought I could play pro ball. I had confidence in my ability, You have to. If you don’t who will?”

And

“My father was totally dedicated to this game and made sure everybody on the team was just as dedicated, because it is the ultimate team sport.”

And

“Anything I do, I always have a reason for.”

Wikipedia:  Johnny Unitas

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 1, 2020 – Jack London

JackLondon777

“I do not live for what the world thinks of me, but for what I think of myself.”

And

“There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.”

And

“The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances.”

And

“I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.”

And

“Life is not always a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well.”

And

“There are things greater than our wisdom, beyond our justice. The right and wrong of this we cannot say, and it is not for us to judge.”

And

“He lacked the wisdom, and the only way for him to get it was to buy it with his youth; and when wisdom was his, youth would have been spent buying it”

And

“San Francisco is gone. Nothing remains of it but memories.”

And

“If cash comes with fame, come fame; if cash comes without fame, come cash.”

And

“You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”

And

“Fiction pays best of all and when it is of fair quality is more easily sold. A good joke will sell quicker than a good poem, and, measured in sweat and blood, will bring better remuneration. Avoid the unhappy ending, the harsh, the brutal, the tragic, the horrible – if you care to see in print things you write. (In this connection don’t do as I do, but do as I say.) Humour is the hardest to write, easiest to sell, and best rewarded… Don’t write too much. Concentrate your sweat on one story, rather than dissipate it over a dozen. Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will nonetheless get something that looks remarkably like it.”

And

“A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.”

And

“Affluence means influence.”

And

“Darn the wheel of the world! Why must it continually turn over? Where is the reverse gear?”

Wikipedia: Jack London

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, May 31, 2020 – Mark Twain

“At last the lake burst upon us–a noble sheet of blue water lifted six thousand three hundred feet above the level of the sea, and walled in by a rim of snow-clad mountain peaks that towered aloft three thousand feet higher still! As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole world affords.”  Mark Twain on Lake Tahoe, Roughing It, 1861

And

“It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native criminal class except Congress.”

And

“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

And

“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.”

And

“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

And

“A man is never more truthful than when he acknowledges himself a liar.”

And

“A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. “

And

“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.”

And

“Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

And

“Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.”

And

“Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

And

“Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today.”

And

“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

And

“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”

And

“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

And

“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

And

“There are lies, damned lies and statistics.”

And

“The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

And

“A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation.”

And

“When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.”

And

“All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.”

And

“My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.”

And

“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.”

And

“The most interesting information comes from children, for they tell all they know and then stop.”

And

“Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.”

And

“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”

And

“The trouble ain’t that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain’t distributed right.”

And

“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”

And

“Substitute “damn” every time you’re inclined to write “very”; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

And

“When angry, count to four; when very angry, swear.”

And

“Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.”

And

‘There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded.”

And

“A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

And

“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way.”

And

“Let us live so that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

And

“It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.”

And

“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”

And

“The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

And

“The man who is a pessimist before 48 knows too much; if he is an optimist after it, he knows too little.”

And

“The public is the only critic whose opinion is worth anything at all.”

And

“I haven’t a particle of confidence in a man who has no redeeming petty vices whatsoever.”

And

‘Reader, suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.”

And

“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—’tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

And

“Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our hardnesses yield, all our irritations and resentments flit away and a sunny spirit takes their place.”

And

“I was sorry to have my name mentioned as one of the great authors, because they have a sad habit of dying off. Chaucer is dead, Spencer is dead, so is Milton, so is Shakespeare, and I’m not feeling so well myself.”

And

“Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest.”

And

“The only reason why God created man is because he was disappointed with the monkey.”

And

“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

And

“Always acknowledge a fault frankly. This will throw those in authority off their guard and give you opportunity to commit more.”

And

“Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered — either by themselves or by others. But for the Civil War, Lincoln and Grant and Sherman and Sheridan would not have been discovered, nor have risen into notice. … I have touched upon this matter in a small book which I wrote a generation ago and which I have not published as yet — Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven. When Stormfield arrived in heaven he … was told that … a shoemaker … was the most prodigious military genius the planet had ever produced.”

And

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.” The Innocents Abroad, 1869

And

“He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it — namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

And

“Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and…Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

And

“France has neither winter nor summer nor morals. Apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.”

And

“Familiarity breeds contempt — and children.”

And

“In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot”

And

“Never let your schooling interfere with your education.”

And

“Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.”

Wikipedia:  Mark Twain

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, May 30, 2020 – George Allen

“Each of us has been put on earth with the ability to do something well. We cheat ourselves and the world if we don’t use that ability as best we can.”

And

“Every day you waste is one you can never make up.”

And

“One of the most difficult things everyone has to learn is that for your entire life you must keep fighting and adjusting if you hope to survive. No matter who you are or what your position is you must keep fighting for whatever it is you desire to achieve.”

And

“People of mediocre ability sometimes achieve outstanding success because they don’t know when to quit. Most men succeed because they are determined to.”

And

“Winning is the science of being totally prepared.”

And

“Every time you win, you’re reborn; when you lose, you die a little.”

And

“Work hard, stay positive, and get up early. It’s the best part of the day.”

And

“The achiever is the only individual who is truly alive.”

And

“The future? This team hasn’t been to the playoffs in over two decades and you’re worried about the future? The Future is Now!”

And

“Football isn’t necessarily won by the best players. It’s won by the team with the best attitude.”

And

“Football is one-third offense, one-third defense, and one-third special teams.”

And

“If you can accept defeat and open your pay envelope without feeling guilty, you’re stealing.”

And

“Try not to do too many things at once. Know what you want, the number one thing today and tomorrow. Persevere and get it done.”

And

“Success is what you do with your ability. It’s how you use your talent.”

And

“Leisure time is that five or six hours when you sleep at night.”

And

“The street to obscurity is paved with athletes who can perform great feats before friendly crowds.”

And

“The tougher the job, the greater the reward.”

And

“Forget the past- the future will give you plenty to worry about”

And

“How badly do you want it?”

And

“Persevere and get it done.”

Wikipedia: George Allen

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, May 29, 2020 – Tennessee Williams

TennesseeWilliams78282

“A high station in life is earned by the gallantry with which appalling experiences are survived with grace.”

And

“All of us are guinea pigs in the laboratory of God. Humanity is just a work in progress.”

And

“Death is one moment, and life is so many of them.”

And

“Don’t look forward to the day you stop suffering, because when it comes you’ll know you’re dead.”

And

“Enthusiasm is the most important thing in life.”

And

“For time is the longest distance between two places.”

And

“Hell is yourself and the only redemption is when a person puts himself aside to feel deeply for another person.”

And

“I have always been pushed by the negative. The apparent failure of a play sends me back to my typewriter that very night, before the reviews are out. I am more compelled to get back to work than if I had a success.”

And

“I have found it easier to identify with the characters who verge upon hysteria, who were frightened of life, who were desperate to reach out to another person. But these seemingly fragile people are the strong people really.”

And

“If the writing is honest it cannot be separated from the man who wrote it.”

And

“In memory everything seems to happen to music.”

And

“Life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quickly you hardly catch it going.”

And

“Life is an unanswered question, but let’s still believe in the dignity and importance of the question.”

And

“Life is partly what we make it, and partly what it is made by the friends we choose.”

And

Luck is believing you’re lucky.

And

“Luxury is the wolf at the door and its fangs are the vanities and conceits germinated by success. When an artist learns this, he knows where the danger is.”

And

“Mendacity is a system that we live in. Liquor is one way out an death’s the other.”

And

“Most of the confidence which I appear to feel, especially when influenced by noon wine, is only a pretense.”

And

“Oh, you weak, beautiful people who give up with such grace. What you need is someone to take hold of you – gently, with love, and hand your life back to you.”

And

“Once you fully apprehend the vacuity of a life without struggle, you are equipped with the basic means of salvation.”

And

“Some mystery should be left in the revelation of character in a play, just as a great deal of mystery is always left in the revelation of character in life, even in one’s own character to himself.”

And

“Success and failure are equally disastrous.”

And

“Success is blocked by concentrating on it and planning for it… Success is shy – it won’t come out while you’re watching.”

And

“The future is called ‘perhaps,’ which is the only possible thing to call the future. And the important thing is not to allow that to scare you.”

And

“The only thing worse than a liar is a liar that’s also a hypocrite!”

And

“The strongest influences in my life and my work are always whomever I love. Whomever I love and am with most of the time, or whomever I remember most vividly. I think that’s true of everyone, don’t you?”

And

“Time rushes towards us with its hospital tray of infinitely varied narcotics, even while it is preparing us for its inevitably fatal operation.”

And

“To be free is to have achieved your life.”

And

“We all live in a house on fire, no fire department to call; no way out, just the upstairs window to look out of while the fire burns the house down with us trapped, locked in it.”

And

“When I stop working the rest of the day is posthumous. I’m only really alive when I’m writing.”

And

“Why did I write? Because I found life unsatisfactory.”

And

“You can be young without money but you can’t be old without it.”

And

“The theatre is a place where one has time for the problems of people to whom one would show the door if they came to one’s office for a job.”

Wikipedia:  Tennessee Williams

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