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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, February 2, 2020 – Joe Namath

JoeNamath677

“First, I prepare. Then I have faith.”

And

“If you aren’t going all the way, why go at all?”

And

“Till I was 13, I thought my name was “Shut Up.””

And

“To be a leader, you have to make people want to follow you, and nobody wants to follow someone who doesn’t know where he is going.”

And

“We’re going to win Sunday. I guarantee it.”

And

“When we won the league championship, all the married guys on the club had to thank their wives for putting up with all the stress and strain all season. I had to thank all the single broads in New York.”

And

“When you have confidence, you can have a lot of fun. And when you have fun, you can do amazing things.”

And

“When you win, nothing hurts.”

And

“You learn how to be a gracious winner and an outstanding loser.”

Wikipedia:  Joe Namath

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, February 1, 2020 – William James

WilliamJames7383

“A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and life is after all a chain.”

And

“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

And

“Acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcoming the consequences of any misfortune.”

And

“Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.”

And

“Action may not bring happiness but there is no happiness without action.”

And

“An idea, to be suggestive, must come to the individual with the force of revelation.”

And

“Belief creates the actual fact.”

And

“Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

And

“Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing.”

And

“Compared to what we ought to be, we are half awake.”

And

“Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.”

And

“Do something everyday for no other reason than you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test.”

And

“Every man who possibly can should force himself to a holiday of a full month in a year, whether he feels like taking it or not.”

And

“Everybody should do at least two things each day that he hates to do, just for practice.”

And

“Faith means belief in something concerning which doubt is theoretically possible.”

And

“Genius… means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way.”

And

“How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure.”

And

“Human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind.”

And

“I don’t sing because I’m happy; I’m happy because I sing.”

And

“If merely ‘feeling good’ could decide, drunkenness would be the supremely valid human experience.”

And

“If you care enough for a result, you will most certainly attain it.”

And

“If you want a quality, act as if you already had it.”

And

“Is life worth living? It all depends on the liver.”

And

“It is only by risking our persons from one hour to another that we live at all. And often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true.”

And

“Most people never run far enough on their first wind to find out they’ve got a second.”

And

“The aim of a college education is to teach you to know a good man when you see one.”

And

“The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.”

And

“The best argument I know for an immortal life is the existence of a man who deserves one.”

And

“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”

And

“The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.”

And

“The world is all the richer for having a devil in it, so long as we keep our foot upon his neck.”

And

“These then are my last words to you. Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

And

“To change ones life: Start immediately. Do it flamboyantly.”

And

“We are all ready to be savage in some cause. The difference between a good man and a bad one is the choice of the cause.”

And

“We don’t laugh because we’re happy – we’re happy because we laugh.”

And

“Whenever you’re in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is “attitude.”

Wikipedia Page: William James

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, January 31, 2020 – William Tecumseh Sherman

“An Army is a collection of armed men obliged to obey one man. Every change in the rules which impairs the principle weakens the army.”

And

“An army to be useful must be a unit, and out of this has grown the saying, attributed to Napoleon, but doubtless spoken before the days of Alexander, that an army with an inefficient commander was better than one with two able heads.”

And

“Courage – a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger, and a mental willingness to endure it.”

And

“I am tired and sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine. It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, for vengeance, for desolation. War is hell.”

And

“I hate newspapermen. They come into camp and pick up their camp rumors and print them as facts. I regard them as spies, which, in truth, they are.”

And

“If I had my choice I would kill every reporter in the world but I am sure we would be getting reports from hell before breakfast.”

And

“I make up my opinions from facts and reasoning, and not to suit any body but myself. If people don’t like my opinions, it makes little difference as I don’t solicit their opinions or votes.”

And

“In our Country… one class of men makes war and leaves another to fight it out.”

And

“It’s a disagreeable thing to be whipped.”

And

“My aim, then, was to whip the rebels, to humble their pride, to follow them to their inmost recesses, and make them fear and dread us. Fear is the beginning of wisdom.”

And

“If nominated, I will not run; if elected, I will not serve.”

And

“I think I understand what military fame is; to be killed on the field of battle and have your name misspelled in the newspapers.”

And

“War is cruelty. There is no use trying to reform it. The crueler it is, the sooner it will be over.”

And

“Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster.”

And

“Grant stood by me when I was crazy, and I stood by him when he was drunk, and now we stand by each other.”

And

“War is the remedy that our enemies have chosen, and I say let us give them all they want.”

And

“I know I had no hand in making this war, and I know I will make more sacrifices today than any of you to secure peace.”

And

“There will soon come an armed contest between capital and labor. They will oppose each other, not with words and arguments, but with shot and shell, gun-powder and cannon. The better classes are tired of the insane howling of the lower strata and they mean to stop them.”

And

“There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell.”

And

“I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah.”

And

“If the people raise a great howl against my barbarity and cruelty, I will answer that war is war, and not popularity seeking.”

Wikipedia: William Tecumseh Sherman

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, January 29, 2020 – Omar Bradley

OmarB2991

“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

And

“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

And

“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

And

“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

And

“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

And

“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

And

“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

And

“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

And

“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

And

Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, January 29, 2020 – Jack London

JackLondon777

“I do not live for what the world thinks of me, but for what I think of myself.”

And

“There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.”

And

“The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances.”

And

“I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.”

And

“Life is not always a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well.”

And

“There are things greater than our wisdom, beyond our justice. The right and wrong of this we cannot say, and it is not for us to judge.”

And

“He lacked the wisdom, and the only way for him to get it was to buy it with his youth; and when wisdom was his, youth would have been spent buying it”

And

“San Francisco is gone. Nothing remains of it but memories.”

And

“If cash comes with fame, come fame; if cash comes without fame, come cash.”

And

“You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”

And

“Fiction pays best of all and when it is of fair quality is more easily sold. A good joke will sell quicker than a good poem, and, measured in sweat and blood, will bring better remuneration. Avoid the unhappy ending, the harsh, the brutal, the tragic, the horrible – if you care to see in print things you write. (In this connection don’t do as I do, but do as I say.) Humour is the hardest to write, easiest to sell, and best rewarded… Don’t write too much. Concentrate your sweat on one story, rather than dissipate it over a dozen. Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will nonetheless get something that looks remarkably like it.”

And

“A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.”

And

“Affluence means influence.”

And

“Darn the wheel of the world! Why must it continually turn over? Where is the reverse gear?”

Wikipedia: Jack London

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, January 28, 2020 – Carl Von Clausewitz

CarlVonClaus67

“All action takes place, so to speak, in a kind of twilight, which like a fog or moonlight, often tends to make things seem grotesque and larger than they really are.”

And

“Courage, above all things, is the first quality of a warrior.”

And

“Everything in war is very simple. But the simplest thing is difficult.”

And

“If the leader is filled with high ambition and if he pursues his aims with audacity and strength of will, he will reach them in spite of all obstacles.”

And

“It is even better to act quickly and err than to hesitate until the time of action is past.”

And

“Never forget that no military leader has ever become great without audacity.”

And

“Principles and rules are intended to provide a thinking man with a frame of reference.”

And

“The backbone of surprise is fusing speed with secrecy.”

And

“The more a general is accustomed to place heavy demands on his soldiers, the more he can depend on their response.”

And

“The political object is the goal, war is the means of reaching it, and the means can never be considered in isolation form their purposes.”

And

“Two qualities are indispensable: first, an intellect that, even in the darkest hour, retains some glimmerings of the inner light which leads to truth; and second, the courage to follow this faint light wherever it may lead.”

And

“War therefore is an act of violence to compel our opponent to fulfill our will.”

And

“Kind-hearted people might of course think there was some ingenious way to disarm or defeat the enemy without too much bloodshed, and might imagine this is the true goal of the art of war. Pleasant as it sounds, it is a fallacy that must be exposed: War is such a dangerous business that mistakes that come from kindness are the very worst.”

And

“Determination in a single instance is an expression of courage; if it becomes characteristic, a mental habit. But here we are referring not to physical courage but to courage to accept responsibility, courage in the face of a moral danger. This has often been called courage d’esprit, because it is created by the intellect. That, however, does not make it an act of the intellect: it is an act of temperament. Intelligence alone is not courage; we often see that the most intelligent people are irresolute. Since in the rush of events a man is governed by feelings rather than by thought, the intellect needs to arouse the quality of courage, which then supports and sustains it in action.
Looked at in this way, the role of determination is to limit the agonies of doubt and the perils of hesitation when the motives for action are inadequate.”

And

“We repeat again: strength of character does not consist solely in having powerful feelings, but in maintaining one’s balance in spite of them. Even with the violence of emotion, judgment and principle must still function like a ship’s compass, which records the slightest variations however rough the sea.”

And

“Men are always more inclined to pitch their estimate of the enemy’s strength too high than too low, such is human nature.”

And

“With uncertainty in one scale, courage and self-confidence should be thrown into the other to correct the balance. The greater they are, the greater the margin that can be left for accidents.”

And

“Although our intellect always longs for clarity and certainty, our nature often finds uncertainty fascinating.”

And

“Any complex activity, if it is to be carried on with any degree of virtuosity, calls for appropriate gifts of intellect and temperament. If they are outstanding and reveal themselves in exceptional achievements, their possessor is called a ‘genius’.”

And

“If the mind is to emerge unscathed from this relentless struggle with the unforeseen, two qualities are indispensable: first, an intellect that, even in the darkest hour, retains some glimmerings of the inner light which leads to truth; and second, the courage to follow this faint light wherever it may lead.”

And

“There are times when the utmost daring is the height of wisdom.”

And

“Boldness governed by superior intellect is the mark of a hero.”

Wikipedia Page: Carl Von Clausewitz


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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, January 28, 2020 – Pat Summitt

“Change equals self improvement. Push yourself to places you haven’t been before.”

And

“Class is more important than a game.”

And

“Combine practice with belief.”

And

“Competition got me off the farm and trained me to seek out challenges and to endure setbacks; and in combination with my faith, it sustains me now in my fight with Alzheimer’s disease.”

And

“Discipline helps you finish a job, and finishing is what separates excellent work from average work.”

And

“Everyone thinks we might curl up and die, both programs. I don’t think it’s going to happen, so put away your hankies.”

And

“God doesn’t take things away to be cruel. He takes things away to make room for other things. He takes things away to lighten us. He takes things away so we can fly.”

And

“Group discipline produces a unified effort toward a common goal.”

And

“Handle Success Like You Handle Failure. You can’t always control what happens, but you can control how you handle it.”

And

“I can remember trying to coach, trying to figure out schemes, and it just wasn’t coming to me.”

And

“I didn’t leave her there for long. When a player makes a mistake, you always want to put them back in quickly—you don’t just berate them and sit them down with no chance for redemption.”

And

“I didn’t say a lot. I didn’t throw anything. That’s not my style. I did think about it though.”

And

“I don’t give out compliments easily.”

And

“I don’t want to sit around the house. I want to be out there. I want to go to practice. I want to be in the huddles. That’s me.”

And

“I hate to sound this way but, ‘Why me? Why me with dementia?”‘

And

“I learned so much from Sue about the X’s and O’s of the game of basketball.”

And

“I think with the players who have been here, regardless of whether they’ve been in that No. 1 position, that’s what we’re always trying to be — the best team.”

And

“I won 1,098 games, and eight national championships, and coached in four different decades. But what I see are not the numbers. I see their faces.”

And

“I’d wake up in the morning and I would think, ‘Where am I?’ I’d have to gather myself.”

And

“If it doesn’t bother you, it won’t bother them.”

And

“If you want to be in the game you better shoot 75% from the line.”

And

“I’m interested to see where a combination of faith and science will take me.”

And

“In the absence of feedback, people will fill in the blanks with a negative. They will assume you don’t care about them or don’t like them.”

And

“It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts the most.”

And

“It’s harder to stay on top than it is to make the climb, Continue to seek new goals.”

And

“I’ve got a great staff and great support system, and I’m going to stick my neck out and do what I always do.”

And

“Kay very calmly and sweetly said, “You know, Pat, how much better do you think Lea Henry and Cindy Noble are going to get at this point?” She was saying ease up—it’s enough. I had reached
the point of diminishing returns. “I think they are both trying really hard to please you, but how much more can they possibly do?” she said. “I just wonder if you’ve really thought about that.’”

And

“Know your strengths, weaknesses, and needs.”

And

“Losing the way we lost is unacceptable in this program. We will learn from it.”

And

“Make Winning an Attitude.”

And

“Most people get excited about games, but I’ve got to be excited about practice, because that’s my classroom.”

And

“Obviously, this was a tough battle for both teams. A great basketball game I’m sure to watch, a challenging one to play in and coach.”

And

“Our philosophy has always been you better pack your defense and your board work on the road. Because those ugly nights and those poor shooting nights — you just have to grind games out.
Today, we just had to grind it out.”

And

“Our team respects Texas. They have beaten us four in a row and beat us by 10 last year in Knoxville. We were not surprised.”

And

“Parker has been handling the ball and bringing it up the floor, running some point as well. Ideally we’d like her closer to the basket, but it’s not like she has to stay on the perimeter.”

And

“Rebounding wins championships, you need to emphasize it and work with kids on it.”

And

“See yourself as self employed.”

And

“Silence is a form of communication, too. Sometimes less is more.”

And

“Sit up straight, listen and participate.”

And

“Someday, I suppose I’ll give up, and sit in the rocking chair. But I’ll probably be rocking fast, because I don’t know what I’ll do without a job.”

And

“Teamwork doesn’t come naturally. It must be taught.”

And

“There is an old saying: a champion is someone who is willing to be uncomfortable.”

And

“We feel like we get everybody’s best shot because we’re Tennessee, but we have to learn how to give everybody our best shot.”

And

“What this tells me is that facts are only the smallest components of memory.”

And

“When she took off, I thought she’s going to try to dunk the ball. I was good with it. I thought she just committed to it a little too early.”

And

“When you grow up on a dairy farm, cows don’t take a day off. So you work every day and my dad always said, ‘No one can outwork you.’”

And

“You have to make shots. That’s the bottom line.”

Wikipedia:  Pat Summitt

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, January 26, 2020 – Gene Roddenberry

GeneRoddenberry7271881

“These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five year mission … to boldly go where no man has gone before.”

And

“A man either lives life as it happens to him, meets it head-on and licks it, or he turns his back on it and starts to wither away.”

And

“If man is to survive, he will have learned to take a delight in the essential differences between men and between cultures. He will learn that differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life’s exciting variety, not something to fear.”

And

“It isn’t all over; everything has not been invented; the human adventure is just beginning.”

And

“Reality is incredibly larger, infinitely more exciting, than the flesh and blood vehicle we travel in here. If you read science fiction, the more you read it the more you realize that you and the universe are part of the same thing. Science knows still practically nothing about the real nature of matter, energy, dimension, or time; and even less about those remarkable things called life and thought. But whatever the meaning and purpose of this universe, you are a legitimate part of it. And since you are part of the all that is, part of its purpose, there is more to you than just this brief speck of existence. You are just a visitor here in this time and this place, a traveler through it.”

And

“I believe in humanity. We are an incredible species. We’re still just a child creature, we’re still being nasty to each other. And all children go through those phases. We’re growing up, we’re moving into adolescence now. When we grow up — man, we’re going to be something!”

And

“It speaks to some basic human needs, that there is a tomorrow — it’s not all going to be over in a big flash and a bomb, that the human race is improving, that we have things to be proud of as humans. No, ancient astronauts did not build the pyramids — human beings built them because they’re clever and they work hard. And Star Trek is about those things.”

And

“Time is the fire in which we burn.”

And

“Star Trek speaks to some basic human needs: that there is a tomorrow — it’s not all going to be over with a big flash and a bomb; that the human race is improving; that we have things to be proud of as humans. No, ancient astronauts did not build the pyramids — human beings built them, because they’re clever and they work hard. And Star Trek is about those things.”

And

“The strength of a civilization is not measured by its ability to fight wars, but rather by its ability to prevent them.”

And

“It is the struggle itself that is most important. We must strive to be more than we are. It does not matter that we will not reach our ultimate goal. The effort itself yields its own reward.”

And

“If man is to survive, he will have learned to take a delight in the essential differences between men and between cultures. He will learn that differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life’s exciting variety, not something to fear.”

And

“Ancient astronauts didn’t build the pyramids. Human beings built the pyramids, because they’re clever and they work hard.”

And

“PICARD: There is no greater challenge than the study of philosophy.
WESLEY: But William James won’t be in my Starfleet exams.
PICARD: The important things never will be. Anyone can be trained in the mechanics of piloting a starship.
WESLEY: But Starfleet Academy
PICARD: It takes more. Open your mind to the past. Art, history, philosophy. And all this may mean something.”

And

“The glory of creation is in its infinite diversity.”

And

“Space… the Final Frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.”

Wikipedia:  Gene Roddenberry

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, January 25, 2020 – Tom Clancy

TomClancy67

“America is the most inventive country in the world because everybody has access to information.”

And

“Fighting wars is not so much about killing people as it is about finding things out. The more you know, the more likely you are to win a battle.”

And

“I was one of the first generations to watch television. TV exposes people to news, to information, to knowledge, to entertainment. How is it bad?”

And

“I’ve made up stuff that’s turned out to be real, that’s the spooky part.”

And

“In the Soviet Union it was illegal to take a photograph of a train station. Look what happened to them. They tried to classify everything.”

And

“It’s not right to say that our loss in Vietnam turned out to be a gain. But lessons were learned. And they were the right lessons.”

And

“Life is about learning; when you stop learning, you die.”

And

“Man is a creature of hope and invention, both of which belie the idea that things cannot be changed.”

And

“No matter what you or anyone else does, there will be someone who says that there’s something bad about it.”

And

“Nothing is as real as a dream. The world can change around you, but your dream will not. Responsibilities need not erase it. Duties need not obscure it. Because the dream is within you, no one can take it away.”

And

“People live longer today than they ever have. They live happier lives, have more knowledge, more information. All this is the result of communications technology. How is any of that bad?”

And

“Probably what pushed the Russians over the edge was SDI. They realized they couldn’t beat us.”

And

“Show me an elitist, and I’ll show you a loser.”

And

“The control of information is something the elite always does, particularly in a despotic form of government. Information, knowledge, is power. If you can control information, you can control people.”

And

“The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense.”

And

“The good old days are now.”

And

“The human condition today is better than it’s ever been, and technology is one of the reasons for that.”

And

“The U.S. Military is us. There is no truer representation of a country than the people that it sends into the field to fight for it. The people who wear our uniform and carry our rifles into combat are our kids, and our job is to support them, because they’re protecting us.”

And

“There are two kinds of people: the ones who need to be told and the ones who figure it out all by themselves.”

And

“There used to be this country called the Soviet Union; it’s not there anymore. Our technology was better than theirs.”

And

“There was a time when nails were high-tech. There was a time when people had to be told how to use a telephone. Technology is just a tool. People use tools to improve their lives.”

And

“Whenever somebody comes up with a good idea, there’s somebody else who has never had a good idea in his life who stands up and says, Oh, you can’t do that.”

Wikipedia:  Tom Clancy

www.tomclancy.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, January 24, 2020 – Arthur Schopenhauer

“A man can be himself only so long as he is alone.”

And

“A man can do what he wants, but not want what he wants.”

And

“A man’s face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man’s thoughts and aspirations.”

And

“All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.”

And

“Boredom is just the reverse side of fascination: both depend on being outside rather than inside a situation, and one leads to the other.”

And

“Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

And

“Honor means that a man is not exceptional; fame, that he is. Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.”

And

“If you want to know your true opinion of someone, watch the effect produced in you by the first sight of a letter from him.”

And

It is with trifles, and when he is off guard, that a man best reveals his character.

And

“Men are by nature merely indifferent to one another; but women are by nature enemies.”

And

“Money is human happiness in the abstract; he, then, who is no longer capable of enjoying human happiness in the concrete devotes himself utterly to money.”

And

“Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.”

And

“The longer a man’s fame is likely to last, the longer it will be in coming.”

And

“The man never feels the want of what it never occurs to him to ask for.”

And

“The wise have always said the same things, and fools, who are the majority have always done just the opposite.”

And

“We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success.”

And

“Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame.”

And

“It is the courage to make a clean breast of it in the face of every question that makes the philosopher. He must be like Sophocles’ Oedipus, who, seeking enlightenment concerning his terrible fate, pursues his indefatigable inquiry even though he divines that appalling horror awaits him in the answer. But most of us carry with us the Jocasta in our hearts, who begs Oedipus, for God’s sake, not to inquire further.”

And

“The bad thing about all religions is that, instead of being able to confess their allegorical nature, they have to conceal it; accordingly, they parade their doctrines in all seriousness as true sensu proprio, and as absurdities form an essential part of these doctrines we have the great mischief of a continual fraud. Nay, what is worse, the day arrives when they are no longer true sensu proprio, and then there is an end of them; so that, in that respect, it would be better to admit their allegorical nature at once. But the difficulty is to teach the multitude that something can be both true and untrue at the same time. Since all religions are in a greater or less degree of this nature, we must recognise the fact that mankind cannot get on without a certain amount of absurdity, that absurdity is an element in its existence, and illusion indispensable; as indeed other aspects of life testify.”

And

“Compassion is the basis of all morality.”

And

“Life is short and truth works far and lives long: let us speak the truth.”

And

“The effect of music is so very much more powerful and penetrating than is that of the other arts, for these others speak only of the shadow, but music of the essence.”

And

“In early youth, as we contemplate our coming life, we are like children in a theatre before the curtain is raised, sitting there in high spirits and eagerly waiting for the play to begin.”

And

“Do not shorten the morning by getting up late, or waste it in unworthy occupations or in talk; look upon it as the quintessence of life, as to a certain extent sacred. Evening is like old age: we are languid, talkative, silly. Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

And

“To free a man from error does not mean to take something from him, but to give him something.”

Wikipedia:  Arthur Schopenhauer

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