Monthly Archive: August 2016

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, August 21, 2016 – Pat Dye

 

PatDye738

“Believe in honest, positive dissent.”

And

Football is not an “I” game. It’s a “we” game.”

And

“Nothing has changed about what makes a winner. A winner works his butt off and is dependable. He’s not always the most talented, but he gives everything on every play.”

And

“At Auburn, practice is Hell. But when you line up across the big, fast, smart, angry boys from Florida, and Georgia, and Alabama, where there is no quality of mercy on the ground and no place to hide, you’ll know why practice is Hell at Auburn.”

And

Don’t wait to be a great man. Be a great boy.”

And

“I don’t believe in miracles. I believe in character”

And

“Life is short, so don’t waste any of it carrying around a load of bitterness. It only sours your life, and the world won’t pay any attention anyway.”

And

“If you’re a football coach, criticism comes with the territory. If it tears you up, you better get into another profession.”

Before the 1981 Iron Bowl between Alabama and Auburn, Paul “Bear” Bryant and Pat Dye (Pat Dye coached for Paul Bryant for nine years on the Alabama staff):

Pat Dye:  “Coach Bryant, before you start hugging me, you ought to know that my boys are fixing to get after y’all’s ass.” 

Paul Bryant:  “You ain’t trying to scare me now, are you, Pat?”

Pat Dye:  “No sir, because I know you don’t get scared. I’m just telling you what we’re fixing to do.”

And

“A game like this, Alabama players will remember it for the rest of their lives. Auburn players…it’ll eat their guts out the rest of their lives.” Former Auburn coach Pat Dye to a reporter after Van Tiffen kicked his 52 yard field goal to beat Auburn in 1985.

Wikipedia:  Pat Dye

www.coachpatdye.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, August 20, 2016 – Francis Ford Coppola

 

FrancisFord777

“A number of images put together a certain way become something quite above and beyond what any of them are individually.”

And

“Anything you build on a large scale or with intense passion invites chaos.”

And

“Art depends on luck and talent.”

And

“I became quite successful very young, and it was mainly because I was so enthusiastic and I just worked so hard at it.”

And

“It’s ironic that at age 32, at probably the greatest moment of my career, with The Godfather having such an enormous success, I wasn’t even aware of it, because I was somewhere else under the deadline again.”

And

“The stuff that I got in trouble for, the casting for The Godfather or the flag scene in Patton, was the stuff that was remembered, and was considered the good work.”

And

“You have to really be courageous about your instincts and your ideas. Otherwise you’ll just knuckle under, and things that might have been memorable will be lost.”

And

“You ought to love what you’re doing because, especially in a movie, over time you really will start to hate it.”

And

“I think cinema, movies, and magic have always been closely associated. The very earliest people who made film were magicians.”

And

“I believe that filmmaking – as, probably, is everything – is a game you should play with all your cards, and all your dice, and whatever else you’ve got. So, each time I make a movie, I give it everything I have. I think everyone should, and I think everyone should do everything they do that way.”

And

“I associate my motion picture career more with being unhappy and scared, or being under the gun, than with anything pleasant.”

And

“The essence of cinema is editing. It’s the combination of what can be extraordinary images of people during emotional moments, or images in a general sense, put together in a kind of alchemy.”

And

On his film, “Apocalypse Now”, at the 1979 Cannes Film Festival: “My movie is not about Vietnam… my movie is Vietnam.”

And

“Anything you build on a large scale or with intense passion invites chaos.”

And

“Lots of people have criticized my movies, but nobody has ever identified the real problem: I’m a sloppy filmmaker.”

And

“The Godfather changed my life, for better or worse. It definitely made me have an older man’s film career when I was 29. So now I say, ‘If I had my older career when I was young, as an older man, maybe I can have a young film-maker’s career.'”

And

“Brando wants to do what you want, but he wants people to be honest and not try to manipulate him.”

And

“Marlon was never hard to work with. His behaviour was a little eccentric on the set. He was like a bad boy and did what he wanted. But as an actor he was never hard to work with.”

And

“I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor, dumb bastard die for his country.

Men, all this stuff you’ve heard about America not wanting to fight, wanting to stay out of the war, is a lot of horse dung. Americans, traditionally, love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle. When you were kids, you all admired the champion marble shooters, the fastest runners, big league ball players, the toughest boxers. Americans love a winner and will not tolerate a loser. Americans play to win all the time. I wouldn’t give a hoot in hell for a man who lost and laughed. That’s why Americans have never lost and will never lose a war, because the very thought of losing is hateful to Americans.

Now, an army is a team. It lives, eats, sleeps, fights as a team. This individuality stuff is a bunch of crap. The bilious bastards who wrote that stuff about individuality for the Saturday

Evening Post don’t know anything more about real battle than they do about fornicating.

Now, we have the finest food and equipment, the best spirit, and the best men in the world. You know, by God I, I actually pity those poor bastards we’re going up against, by God, I do.

We’re not just going to shoot the bastards; we’re going to cut out their living guts and use them to grease the treads of our tanks. We’re going to murder those lousy Hun bastards by the bushel.

Now, some of you boys, I know, are wondering whether or not you’ll chicken out under fire. Don’t worry about it. I can assure you that you will all do your duty.

The Nazis are the enemy. Wade into them. Spill their blood. Shoot them in the belly. When you put your hand into a bunch of goo that a moment before was your best friend’s face, you’ll know what to do.

Now there’s another thing I want you to remember: I don’t want to get any messages saying that we are holding our position. We’re not holding anything. Let the Hun do that. We are advancing constantly and we’re not interested in holding onto anything except the enemy. We’re going to hold onto him by the nose and we’re going to kick him in the ass. We’re going to kick the hell out of him all the time and we’re going to go through him like crap through a goose.

Now, there’s one thing that you men will be able to say when you get back home. And you may thank God for it. Thirty years from now when you’re sitting around your fireside with your grandson on your knee, and he asks you: “What did you do in the great World War II?” You won’t have to say, “Well, I shoveled shit in Louisiana.”

Alright, now, you sons-of-bitches, you know how I feel. Oh… I will be proud to lead you wonderful guys into battle anytime, anywhere.

That’s all.” Opening Speech by George C. Scott playing General Patton in move Patton

And

“It was here. The battlefield was here. The Carthaginians defending the city were attacked by three Roman Legions. The Carthaginians were proud and brave but they couldn’t hold. They were massacred. The Arab women stripped them of the tunics and swords, and lances. And the soldiers lay naked in the sun. 2000 years ago. I was here. (Looking at Bradley) You don’t believe me, do you Brad?

You know what the poet said:
‘Through the travail of ages,
Midst the pomp and toils of war,
Have I fought and strove and perished
Countless times upon a star.
As if through a glass, and darkly
The age-old strife I see—
Where I fought in many guises, many names—
but always me.’
Do you know who the poet was? Me.” Battle of Carthage Scene, movie Patton

And

“All Mighty and most merciful Father, We humbly beseech Thee, of thy great goodness to restrain this immoderate weather with which we have had to contend. Grant us fair weather for battle. Graciously hearken to us as soldiers who call upon Thee that, armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies and establish Thy justice among men and nations. Amen.” Weather Prayer, move Patton

Wikipedia: Francis Ford Coppola

Francis Ford Coppola Winery

Coppola – Inglenook – Rubicon Winery

American Zoetrope

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, August 19, 2016 – Andrew Grove

 

AndyGrove777

“Leaders have to act more quickly today. The pressure comes much faster.”

And

“Success breeds complacency. Complacency breeds failure. Only the paranoid survive.”

And

“So give me a turbulent world as opposed to a quiet world and I’ll take the turbulent one.”

And

“There is at least one point in the history of any company when you have to change dramatically to rise to the next level of performance. Miss that moment – and you start to decline.”

And

“It’s not enough to make time for your children. There are certain stages in their lives when you have to give them the time when they want it. You can’t run your family like a company. It doesn’t work.”

And

“A fundamental rule in technology says that whatever can be done will be done.”

And

“A corporation is a living organism; it has to continue to shed its skin. Methods have to change. Focus has to change. Values have to change. The sum total of those changes is transformation.”

And

“You have to pretend you’re 100 percent sure. You have to take action; you can’t hesitate or hedge your bets. Anything less will condemn your efforts to failure.”

And

“Stressing output is the key to improving productivity, while looking to increase activity can result in just the opposite.”

And

“Our biggest competition in achieving our ambitions, … is a television set.”

And

“Technology happens, it’s not good, it’s not bad. Is steel good or bad?”

And

“Your career is your business, and you are its CEO.”

And

“The Lesson is, we all need to expose ourselves to the winds of change”

And

“Strategic changes doesn’t just start at the top. It starts with your calender”

And

“The person who is the star of previous era is often the last one to adapt to change, the last one to yield to logic of a strategic inflection point and tends to fall harder than most.”

And

“If you’re wrong, you will die. But most companies don’t die because they are wrong; most die because they don’t commit themselves. They fritter away their valuable resources while attempting to make a decision. The greatest danger is in Standing still”

And

“Selectivity – the determination to choose what we will attempt to get done and what we won’t – is the only way out of the panic that excessive demands on our time can create.”

And

“Business success contains the seeds of its own destruction. The more Successful you are, the more people want a chunk of your business and then another chunk and then another until there is nothing”

And

“People in the trenches are usually in touch with impending changes early”

And

“It’s harder to be the best of class in several fields than in just one”

And

“How can you motivate yourself to continue to follow a leader when he appears to be going around in circles?”

And

“A strategic inflection point is a time in the life of business when its fundamentals are about to change. that change can mean an opportunity to rise to new heights. But it may just as likely signal the beginning of the end”

And

“As we throw ourselves into raw actions, our senses and instincts will rapidly be honed again”

And

“Just as you would not permit a fellow employee to steal a piece of office equipment worth $2,000, you shouldn’t let anyone walk away with the time of his fellow managers.”

And

“Bad companies are destroyed by crisis, Good companies survive them, Great companies are improved by them.”

And

“You need to try to do the impossible, to anticipate the unexpected. And when the unexpected happens, you should double the efforts to make order from the disorder it creates in your life. The motto I’m advocating is — Let chaos reign, then rein chaos. Does that mean that you shouldn’t plan? Not at all. You need to plan the way a fire department plans. It cannot anticipate fires, so it has to shape a flexible organization that is capable of responding to unpredictable events.”

And

“You have no choice but to operate in a world shaped by globalization and the information revolution. There are two options: adapt or die.”

And

“I think it is very important for you to do two things: act on your temporary conviction as if it was a real conviction; and when you realize that you are wrong, correct course very quickly”

Wikipedia:  Andrew Grove

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Ron Turner and Florida International in 2016 – Even FOUR Years Later We Still Haven’t A Damn Clue Why Mario Cristobal Was Fired By FIU…and Even Crazier…Why Was He Replaced With Ron Freaking Turner? It’s SIX Wins Plus For Ron Turner and FIU In 2016….Right? Who the Hell Knows…Yes At FIU It’s…Send in the Clowns!

 

Ron Turner, Florida International

RonCarager181818

4 th season at Florida International

Overall Record (San Jose St, Illinois, Florida International):  52 – 87  (.374)

Overall Conference Record:  31 – 63  (.330)

Florida International Record:  10 – 26  (.278)

Florida International Conference Record:  7 – 17  (.292)

MarioCristobal8118111

Not what we here at Coaches Hot Seat or anyone else understood why the last Florida International head coach before Ron Turner, Mario Cristobal, was fired at FIU after the 2012 season when he was sitting on a record over the 2010, 2011, and 2012 seasons of….

18 – 20 at FIU

….which is a minor miracle at a place like FIU which included taking the Panthers to bowl games in 2011 and 2012 BUT if you are going to fire the most successful head coach in school history you are certainly going to replace him with someone better…..right?

NOT!

In 2012 Ron Turner who then had a career head coaching record in college football of…

42 – 61

….at San Jose State and Illinois, which included THREE straight losing seasons before he was fired by the Illini after the 2004 season, was hired to replace Mario Cristobal and in THREE seasons how many games has Ron Turner won at FIU you ask?
10 Freaking Football Games!

We got to see FIU play parts of a few games in 2015 and we will admit that the Panthers are about 75% of the way back to where they were when Mario Cristobal was fired BUT that is THREE seasons later, and now entering his FOURTH year on the job one would have to think that either Ron Turner gets…

6 Wins

….at least in 2016 or he is done at FIU….right?

Who the Hell knows because we still can’t figure out why Ron Turner was ever hired at FIU!

OK…let’s go US Navy Intelligence here and assume there is at least one human being working at FIU that…

Knows Their Ass From the Side of a Barn

BozemanMontanaBarnSide818181

…and that they have already told Ron Turner something like….

“6 Wins Plus in 2016 Ron or you are done come December”

….which brings us to FIU’s 2016 football schedule to see if 6 wins is doable or not:

Indiana
Maryland
At UMass
UCF
FAU
At UTEP
At Charlotte
La. Tech
Middle Tennessee
At Western Kentucky
Marshall
At Old Dominion

Geez…if anyone out there sees…

6 Wins

…on FIU’s 2016 schedule then please drop us a note because we don’t think there is a…

Freaking Chance in Hell

…that Ron Turner and his Panthers win 6 games this season but then that’s why the play the games….right? RIGHT!

If Ron Turner doesn’t get to at least 6 wins in 2016 that will make it…

12 out of 14 seasons that FIU has played football that they didn’t hit the .500 mark

…and who has those TWO .500-plus seasons coaching FIU you ask?

Well of course….Mario Cristobal.

MarioCristobal8118111

For some reason Frank Sinatra singing Send in the Clowns seems appropriate in this spot!

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, August 18, 2016 – Carl Von Clausewitz

 

CarlVonClaus67

“All action takes place, so to speak, in a kind of twilight, which like a fog or moonlight, often tends to make things seem grotesque and larger than they really are.”

And

“Courage, above all things, is the first quality of a warrior.”

And

“Everything in war is very simple. But the simplest thing is difficult.”

And

“If the leader is filled with high ambition and if he pursues his aims with audacity and strength of will, he will reach them in spite of all obstacles.”

And

“It is even better to act quickly and err than to hesitate until the time of action is past.”

And

“Never forget that no military leader has ever become great without audacity.”

And

“Principles and rules are intended to provide a thinking man with a frame of reference.”

And

“The backbone of surprise is fusing speed with secrecy.”

And

“The more a general is accustomed to place heavy demands on his soldiers, the more he can depend on their response.”

And

“The political object is the goal, war is the means of reaching it, and the means can never be considered in isolation form their purposes.”

And

“Two qualities are indispensable: first, an intellect that, even in the darkest hour, retains some glimmerings of the inner light which leads to truth; and second, the courage to follow this faint light wherever it may lead.”

And

“War therefore is an act of violence to compel our opponent to fulfill our will.”

And

“Kind-hearted people might of course think there was some ingenious way to disarm or defeat the enemy without too much bloodshed, and might imagine this is the true goal of the art of war. Pleasant as it sounds, it is a fallacy that must be exposed: War is such a dangerous business that mistakes that come from kindness are the very worst.”

And

“Determination in a single instance is an expression of courage; if it becomes characteristic, a mental habit. But here we are referring not to physical courage but to courage to accept responsibility, courage in the face of a moral danger. This has often been called courage d’esprit, because it is created by the intellect. That, however, does not make it an act of the intellect: it is an act of temperament. Intelligence alone is not courage; we often see that the most intelligent people are irresolute. Since in the rush of events a man is governed by feelings rather than by thought, the intellect needs to arouse the quality of courage, which then supports and sustains it in action.
Looked at in this way, the role of determination is to limit the agonies of doubt and the perils of hesitation when the motives for action are inadequate.”

And

“We repeat again: strength of character does not consist solely in having powerful feelings, but in maintaining one’s balance in spite of them. Even with the violence of emotion, judgment and principle must still function like a ship’s compass, which records the slightest variations however rough the sea.”

And

“Men are always more inclined to pitch their estimate of the enemy’s strength too high than too low, such is human nature.”

And

“With uncertainty in one scale, courage and self-confidence should be thrown into the other to correct the balance. The greater they are, the greater the margin that can be left for accidents.”

And

“Although our intellect always longs for clarity and certainty, our nature often finds uncertainty fascinating.”

And

“Any complex activity, if it is to be carried on with any degree of virtuosity, calls for appropriate gifts of intellect and temperament. If they are outstanding and reveal themselves in exceptional achievements, their possessor is called a ‘genius’.”

And

“If the mind is to emerge unscathed from this relentless struggle with the unforeseen, two qualities are indispensable: first, an intellect that, even in the darkest hour, retains some glimmerings of the inner light which leads to truth; and second, the courage to follow this faint light wherever it may lead.”

And

“There are times when the utmost daring is the height of wisdom.”

And

“Boldness governed by superior intellect is the mark of a hero.”

Wikipedia Page: Carl Von Clausewitz

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, August 17, 2016 – Paul Newman

 

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“I had no natural gift to be anything — not an athlete, not an actor, not a writer, not a director, a painter of garden porches — not anything. So I’ve worked really hard, because nothing ever came easily to me.”

And

“Study your craft and know who you are and what’s special about you. Find out what everyone does on a film set, ask questions and listen. Make sure you live life, which means don’t do things where you court celebrity, and give something positive back to our society.”

And

“A man with no enemies is a man with no character.”

And

“Money won is twice as sweet as money earned.”

And

“Newman’s first law: It is useless to put on your brakes when you’re upside down.”

And

“Newman’s second law: Just when things look darkest, they go black.”

And

“If you’re playing a poker game and you look around the table and and can’t tell who the sucker is, it’s you.”

And

“Every time I get a script it’s a matter of trying to know what I could do with it. I see colors, imagery. It has to have a smell. It’s like falling in love. You can’t give a reason why.”

And

“The embarrassing thing is that the salad dressing is outgrossing my films.”

And

“You gotta have two things to win.  You gotta have brains and you gotta have balls.  Now, you got too much of one and not enough of the other.”  Paul Newman as Eddie Felson, The Color of Money, 1986

Wikipedia Page:  Paul Newman

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, August 16, 2016 – George Lucas

 

GeorgeLucas787

“A lot of people like to do certain things, but they’re not that good at it. Keep going through the things that you like to do, until you find something that you actually seem to be extremely good at. It can be anything.”

And

“Everybody has talent, it’s just a matter of moving around until you’ve discovered what it is.”

And

“Part of the issue of achievement is to be able to set realistic goals, but that’s one of the hardest things to do because you don’t always know exactly where you’re going, and you shouldn’t.”

And

“Star Wars” is fun, its exciting, its inspirational, and people respond to that. It’s what they want.”

And

“Whatever has happened in my quest for innovation has been part of my quest for immaculate reality.”

And

“When you are a beginning film maker you are desperate to survive. The most important thing in the end is survival and being able to get to your next picture.”

And

“Working hard is very important. You’re not going to get anywhere without working extremely hard.”

And

“You simply have to put one foot in front of the other and keep going. Put blinders on and plow right ahead.”

And

“Dreams are extremely important. You can’t do it unless you can imagine it.”

And

“Luke, there is no try, there is either do or not do.”

And

“Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering.”

And

“In my experience, there’s no such thing as luck.”

And

“You sort of see these recurring themes where a democracy turns itself into a dictatorship, and it always seems to happen kind of in the same way, with the same kinds of issues, and threats from the outside, needing more control. A democratic body, a senate, not being able to function properly because everybody’s squabbling, there’s corruption.”

And

“Being in Washington is more fictional than being in Hollywood.”

And

“Don’t avoid the cliches – they are cliches because they work!”

And

Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back

“Yoda: Ready are you? What know you of ready? For eight hundred years have I trained Jedi. My own counsel will I keep on who is to be trained. A Jedi must have the deepest commitment, the most serious mind. This one a long time have I watched. All his life has he looked away… to the future, to the horizon. Never his mind on where he was. Hmm? What he was doing. Hmph. Adventure. Heh. Excitement. Heh. A Jedi craves not these things. You are reckless.”

And

“[Luke has seen a vision of Han, Leia and Chewie being tortured in Cloud City]
Luke: I saw – I saw a city in the clouds.
Yoda: [nods] Friends you have there.
Luke: They were in pain…
Yoda: It is the future you see.
Luke: The future?
[pause]
Luke: Will they die?
Yoda: [closes his eyes for a moment] Difficult to see. Always in motion is the future.
Luke: I’ve got to go to them.
Yoda: Decide you must, how to serve them best. If you leave now, help them you could; but you would destroy all for which they have fought, and suffered.”

And

“C-3PO: Sir, the possibility of successfully navigating an asteroid field is approximately 3,720 to 1.
Han Solo: Never tell me the odds. “

And

“[Luke can’t levitate his X-Wing out of the bog] 

Luke: I can’t. It’s too big.
Yoda: Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size, do you? Hmm? Hmm. And well you should not. For my ally is the Force, and a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this crude matter. You must feel the Force around you; here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Even between the land and the ship.”

And

“Yoda: I am wondering, why are you here?
Luke: I’m looking for someone.
Yoda: Looking? Found someone, you have, I would say, hmmm?
Luke: Right…
Yoda: Help you I can. Yes, mmmm.
Luke: I don’t think so. I’m looking for a great warrior.
Yoda: Ohhh. Great warrior.
[laughs and shakes his head]
Yoda: Wars not make one great.”

And

“Luke: All right, I’ll give it a try.
Yoda: No. Try not. Do… or do not. There is no try.

And

“[Using the Force, Yoda effortlessly frees the X-Wing from the bog]
Luke: I don’t, I don’t believe it.
Yoda: That is why you fail.”

And

“Yoda: Yes, run! Yes, a Jedi’s strength flows from the Force. But beware of the dark side. Anger, fear, aggression; the dark side of the Force are they. Easily they flow, quick to join you in a fight. If once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny, consume you it will, as it did Obi-Wan’s apprentice.
Luke: Vader… Is the dark side stronger?
Yoda: No, no, no. Quicker, easier, more seductive.
Luke: But how am I to know the good side from the bad?
Yoda: You will know… when you are calm, at peace, passive. A Jedi uses the Force for knowledge and defense, NEVER for attack.
Luke: But tell my why I can’t…
Yoda: No, no! There is no “why””

And

“Luke: I won’t fail you. I’m not afraid.
Yoda: You will be. You… will… be.”

And

“Luke: There’s something not right here… I feel cold. Death.
Yoda: [points to a cave opening beneath a large tree] That place… is strong with the dark side of the Force. A domain of evil it is. In you must go.
Luke: What’s in there?
Yoda: Only what you take with you.”

Wikipedia:  George Lucas

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Paul Haynes and Kent State in 2016 – It Looks Like Paul Haynes Will Need To Get His Golden Flashes To SIX Wins In 2016 To Hang Onto His Job…But Have You Seen the Golden Flashes Schedule This Season? Damn!

 

Paul Haynes, Kent State

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4 th season at Kent State

Overall Record:  9 – 26  (.257)

Overall Conference Record:  6 – 17  (.261)

It’s not like Paul Haynes is coaching at a college football juggernaut in Kent State BUT Haynes took over a Golden Flashes team in 2013 that had gone 11 – 3 the year before under Darrell Hazell and in three seasons Haynes has won..

9 Freaking Football Games

…or 2 Damn Less Games than the Golden Flashes won in 2012!

Sorry where we come from…or where anyone comes from for that matter….winning three games a season…even at Kent State is nothing less than a…

Complete Freaking Disaster

…and thus why Paul Haynes finds his rear-end squarely on the Hot Seat and fighting for his job this season.

Box of safety matches

Now what we know about the expectations for Kent State football would easily fit on a box of matches BUT we asked one of our friends in MAC country what he thought of Paul Haynes situation at KSU in 2016 and his response was…

“Paul better Damn win 6 games or he will be looking for a job come December.”

Well….with the above in mind let’s take a look at Kent State’s 2016 schedule to see if Haynes has a chance in Hell in hanging onto this job this season…

At Penn State
North Carolina A&T
Monmouth
At Alabama
Akron
At Buffalo
At Miami (Ohio)
Ohio
At Central Michigan
Western Michigan
At Bowling Green
Northern Illinois

Oh Shit…with that schedule if Paul Haynes needs 6 wins in 2016 to hang onto his job then…

Paul Haynes Doesn’t Have A Freaking Chance in Hell of Being the Head Coach at Kent State when December 2016 rolls around!

Now Paul Haynes….are you and YOUR Golden Flashes going to prove us wrong?

We rather doubt it!

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, August 15, 2016 – Chester William Nimitz

 

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“I do believe we are going to have a major war, with Japan and Germany, and that the war is going to start by a very serious surprise attack and defeat of U.S. armed forces, and that there is going to be a major revulsion on the part of the political power in Washington against all those in command at sea, and they are going to be thrown out, though it won’t be their fault necessarily. And I wish to be in a position of sufficient prominence so that I will then be considered as one to be sent to sea, because that appears to be the route.” 

And

“A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder.”

And

“Through the skill and devotion to duty of their armed forces of all branches in the Midway area our citizens can now rejoice that a momentous victory is in the making.”
After the Battle of Midway, CINCPAC Communiqué No. 3, June 6, 1942

And

“Is the proposed operation likely to succeed?
What might be the consequences of failure?
Is it in the realm of practicability in terms of material and supplies?”
“Three favorite rules of thumb” Nimitz had printed on a card he kept on his desk

And

“They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side…To them, we have a solemn obligation — the obligation to ensure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live.” Of those who died in the war in the Pacific, after ceremonies in Tokyo Bay accepting the official surrender of Japan, September 2, 1945

And

“The U.S.’s major strength factor and weapon is its economy. If you cripple it, you cripple the military.” 

And

“That is not to say that we can relax our readiness to defend ourselves. Our armament must be adequate to the needs, but our faith is not primarily in these machines of defense but in ourselves.” 

And

“God grant me the courage not to give up what I think is right even though I think it is hopeless.”

And

“Sir Walter Raleigh declared in the early 17th century that “whoever commands the sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade of the world commands the riches of the world, and consequently the world itself.” This principle is as true today as when uttered, and its effect will continue as long as ships traverse the seas.” Employment of Naval Forces, 1948

And

“The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy’s capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor’s will.”

And

“The qualities of the Nimitz character were apparent in his face, in his career, and in his heritage; combined these factors made him precisely the man he was and placed him in this particular situation at this moment in history. … He was not a cold man, or a bad tempered man — quite the contrary — to the world he presented a figure of almost total complacency; he seldom lost his temper or raised his voice. … It could be said that King was a driver who knew how to lead; it could also be said that Nimitz was a leader who conquered any personal urge to drive, and achieved his ends more by persuasion and inspiration to men under his command.” Edwin Palmer Hoyt in How They Won the War in the Pacific : Nimitz and His Admirals (2000), p. 28 – 29

And

“On April 13, 1943, Allied radio intelligence intercepted a message carrying the travel itinerary of Admiral Yamamoto. The detail in the message listed flight and ground schedules and included what type of fighter escort would be provided. Major Red Lasswell of FRUPAC broke the coded message. The decision of what to do with the information was left to Admiral Nimitz. Nimitz consulted Layton as to what the ramifications would be if Yamamoto were removed. They considered that he might be replaced with a better commander, and Nimitz felt familiar with Yamamoto as his opponent. Layton felt nobody could adequately replace Yamamoto, and based on this opinion Nimitz gave Admiral Halsey the authority to carry out the intercept of Yamamoto’s aircraft. On 18 April, a flight of P-38 fighters with specially selected pilots and equipped with long-range fuel tanks shot down Yamamoto’s aircraft, killing one of Japan’s top naval leaders.” Ricky J. Nussio, in Sherman and Nimitz: Executing Modern Information Operations (2001)

And

“He surrounded himself with the ablest men he could find and sought their advice, but he made his own decisions. He was a keen strategist who never forgot that he was dealing with human beings, on both sides of the conflict. He was aggressive in war without hate, audacious while never failing to weigh the risks.” E. B. Potter, Naval historian at the US Naval Academy, quoted on the cover jacket of his book Nimitz (1976)

And

“Of the Marines on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

And

“He brought to his new job a number of advantages, including experience, a detailed knowledge of his brother officers, and a sense of inner balance and calm that steadied those around him. He had the ability to pick able subordinates and the courage to let them do their jobs without interference. He molded such disparate personalities as the quiet, introspective Raymond A. Spruance and the ebullient, aggressive William F. Halsey, Jr. into an effective team.” Robert William Love, on the rise of Nimitz to CINCPAC in The Chiefs of Naval Operations

Wikipedia: Chester William Nimitz

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, August 14, 2016 – Steve Spurrier

 

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Head Ball Coach: My Life in Football, Doing It Differently–and Winning, Steve Spurrier & Buddy Martin, Amazon.com

“I know the critics are out there. That’s why they’re called critics. They criticize every chance they get.”

And

“People ask, ‘Why are you still coaching?’ I forgot to get fired and I’m not going to cheat.”

And

“So, I didn’t say we are going to win a lot, but we are going to play like winners, and we’ve got a plan in place to teach our guys how to play like winners and play like a champion.”

And

“I don’t want to coach too far into my 60s. By then, I’ll be playing golf four or five times a week.”

And

“But as coaches, we need to get a little more fire and passion and be more demanding that our guys get the job done. I think players will respond to that, and we’ll see.”

And

On the Death Valley nickname: “Most of our guys have never been to Death Valley. (LSU’s stadium) is the Death Valley, isn’t it? Or is there another one? There’s two of them. That’s right. There’s two Death Valleys.”

And

On the state of the South Carolina program (widely attributed, but probably not an original): “We aren’t LSU and we aren’t Alabama. But we sure ain’t Clemson.”

And

On Dabo Swinney’s anger over the above quote: “I said, ‘Well, what do you want me to do? I didn’t say it.’ Smart people don’t believe everything they read, and they don’t believe hearsay. … I guess Dabo believed it.”

And

On a fire at the football dorm that destroyed 20 books: “But the real tragedy was that 15 hadn’t been colored yet.”

And

On scandal in Tallahassee: “You know what FSU stands for, don’t you? Free Shoes University.”

And

On illegal hits against Danny Wuerffel: “He’s like a New Testament person. He gets slapped up side the face, and turns the other cheek and says, ‘Lord, forgive them for they know not what they’re doing.’ I’m probably more of an Old Testament guy. You spear our guy in the earhole, we think we’re supposed to spear you in the earhole. That’s kind of where we’re a little different.”

And

On recruiting: “In 12 years at Florida, I don’t think we ever signed a kid from the state of Alabama … Of course, we found out later that the scholarships they were giving out at Alabama were worth a whole lot more than ours.”

And

On the Vols missing out on the Sugar Bowl during his Florida years: “You can’t spell Citrus without U-T.”

And

On Peyton Manning: “I know why Peyton came back for his senior year. He wanted to be a three-time star of the Citrus Bowl.”

And

On playing the Dawgs early: “I don’t know. I sort of always liked playing them that second game because you could always count on them having two or three key players suspended.”

And

On Georgia recruiting: “Why is it that during recruiting season they sign all the great players, but when it comes time to play the game, we have all the great players? I don’t understand that. What happens to them?”

And

On South Carolina’s 52-7 win over the Razorbacks: “I do feel badly for Arkansas. That’s no fun getting your butt beat at home, homecoming and all that.”

And

On the Gamecocks’ matchup at Tennessee “Will be the 14th time I’ve coached in Neyland Stadium. … I’ve coached there more than some of their head coaches.”

And

On his age: “The Pope is 77 years old and he’s in charge of a billion people. All I have to do is put 11 on the field.”

Wikipedia:  Steve Spurrier

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