Monthly Archive: October 2016

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 13, 2016 – Abraham Lincoln

 

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“A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

And

“All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind.”

And

“Allow the president to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such a purpose – and you allow him to make war at pleasure.”

And

“Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other.”

And

“America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.”

And

“Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable – a most sacred right – a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.”

And

“As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy.”

And

“Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.”

And

“Books serve to show a man that those original thoughts of his aren’t very new at all.”

And

“Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.”

And

“Every man is said to have his peculiar ambition. Whether it be true or not, I can say for one that I have no other so great as that of being truly esteemed of my fellow men, by rendering myself worthy of their esteem.”

And

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”

And

“I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts.”

And

“I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have. I must stand with anybody that stands right, and stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong.”

And

“I desire so to conduct the affairs of this administration that if at the end… I have lost every other friend on earth, I shall at least have one friend left, and that friend shall be down inside of me.”

And

“I do the very best I know how – the very best I can; and I mean to keep on doing so until the end.”

And

“I never had a policy; I have just tried to do my very best each and every day.”

And

“I was losing interest in politics, when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again. What I have done since then is pretty well known.”

And

“I will prepare and some day my chance will come.”

And

“If there is anything that a man can do well, I say let him do it. Give him a chance.”

And

“In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.”

And

“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

And

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”

And

“Surely God would not have created such a being as man, with an ability to grasp the infinite, to exist only for a day! No, no, man was made for immortality.”

And

“The assertion that “all men are created equal” was of no practical use in effecting our separation from Great Britain and it was placed in the Declaration not for that, but for future use.”

And

“These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert, to fleece the people.”

And

“Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”

And

“You cannot build character and courage by taking away a man’s initiative and independence.”

And

“Determine that the thing can and shall be done, and then we shall find the way.”

And

“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it.”

And

“The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall our selves, and then we shall save our country. Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this administration, will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance, or insignificance, can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass, will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation.” Second State of the Union Address, December 1, 1862

And

“At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? By what means shall we fortify against it? — Shall we expect some transatlantic military giant, to step the Ocean, and crush us at a blow? Never! — All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Buonaparte for a commander, could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio, or make a track on the Blue Ridge, in a trial of a thousand years.

At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide.” Lycecum Address, 1838

And

“Slavery is founded in the selfishness of man’s nature — opposition to it, in his love of justice. These principles are an eternal antagonism; and when brought into collision so fiercely, as slavery extension brings them, shocks, and throes, and convulsions must ceaselessly follow. Repeal the Missouri Compromise — repeal all compromises — repeal the Declaration of Independence — repeal all past history, you still can not repeal human nature. It still will be the abundance of man’s heart, that slavery extension is wrong; and out of the abundance of his heart, his mouth will continue to speak.”

And

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

The Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863

And

Lincoln’s War, The Untold Story of American’s Greatest President as Commander in Chief by Geoffrey Perret

Here is a great excerpt from that book that happened just after the First Battle of Bull Run, August 1861:

“Dozens of regiments had set up impromptu around Fort Corcoran, on Arlington Heights. Every day these canvas congeries trembled like leaves in the wind as fresh rumors of an impending Confederate attack. And every day Lincoln heard fresh stories of demoralized troops, mutinous regiments, poor discipline. Some regiments were entitled to – and clamoring for – an immediate discharge, their ninety-day service complete. The War Department’s officers seemed to busy for the burdensome task of mustering them out. Unchecked, however, mutinous sentiments could spread through camps like a virulent disease.

Lincoln decided to see for himself, and Seward went with him. A few days after Bull Run, they rode across the Potomac in an open carriage on an impromptu visit to the troops. What greeted them was redoubts spreading across the landscape, tents sprouting like mushrooms in nearly every direction, dusty roads, a cross-hatching of cart tracks, men milling or lolling about, few signs of order or purpose. Yet the District, on edge for its safety, has more than enough men to defend it – if the men chose.

As the carriage rattled along towards Fort Corcoran, a red-bearded colonel strode up: William Tecumseh Sherman. He had commanded a brigade at Bull Run, superbly. Sherman asked if the President had come to see the troops. “Yes,” said Lincoln. “We heard that you had got over the big scare and we thought we would come over and see the boys.”

Sherman got into the carriage, giving the driver directions to a camp at the top of a small hill. Sitting next to Lincoln, he asked if the President intended to speak to the men. “I would like to,” said Lincoln.

Sherman said he no objection to that, but he did not want cheering, “No hurrahing, no humbug. We had enough of it before Bull Run to spoil any set of them.” None worse than the 69 th New York, filled with Irishmen angry at not being discharged. Sherman had rebuked one of the officers of lax discipline.

Standing in the carriage, Lincoln gave an impromptu talk to Sherman’s troops: bravery, sacrifice, gratitude, a glorious future. The men began to cheer, but he held up his hand. “Don’t cheer boys, I confess I rather like it myself, but Colonel Sherman says it is not military, and I guess we had better defer to his opinion.”

Closing his impromptu peroration, Lincoln said that as Commander in Chief, he was determined that every man should be treated exactly as the law required: his indirect promise that those entitled to a discharge would soon have one. As the carriage moved on, a young officer ran after it, calling out piteously, “Mr. Lincoln! Mr. Lincoln!”

Lincoln ordered the driver to stop. Here was the officer of the 69 th New York whom Sherman had criticized, panting hard. “Mr. President, I have a cause of grievance. This morning I went to speak to Colonel Sherman, and he threatened to shoot me.”

“I told him Mr. President, that if he refused to obey my order, I would shoot him on the spot,” said Sherman. “And I here repeat it, sir, that if I remain in command here, and he or any other man refuses to obey my orders, I’ll shoot him on the spot.”

Lincoln bent forward. “My lad, if I were you, and he threatened to shoot, I would not trust him, for I believe he would do it!” The troops, until then sympathetic to the officer, howled with laughter.

Both Seward and Lincoln were impressed by the comparative tidiness of the camps of Sherman’s regiments. “This is the first bright moment I’ve experienced since the battle,” Lincoln told Sherman before riding off. From his own military experience, he knew that neatness and cleanliness is an army spelled discipline; neglect was a signal of trouble to come.”

End of excerpt from Lincoln’s War

Wikipedia: Abraham Lincoln

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Post Week 6 Coaches Hot Seat Rankings – Just Keep Giving Them Hell Mr. Cash…Just Keep Giving These Hot Seat Coaches Hell!

 

Post Week 6 Coaches Hot Seat Rankings

A chair on fire... metaphor "In The Hot Seat"

Just Keep Giving Them Hell Mr. Cash…Just Keep Giving These Hot Seat Coaches Hell!

Post Week 6 Coaches Hot Seat Rankings

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1.  Charlie Strong, Texas – Yes…Charlie Strong’s records in three seasons at Texas are might ugly indeed now standing at…

Overall:  13 – 17

Big 12:  9 – 1

…but perhaps the ugliest record of all is Strong’s record against Power 5 Conference Teams at Texas over the last three years…

10 – 17

That’s a…

.370%

….winning percentage against schools in Power 5 Conferences at TEXAS which in our opinion has as much or more talent than almost every team on its schedule each year which really brings us to this question which is the fundamental question that any employer must ask him or herself about a struggling employee:

Would I hire this person again if I had to make the decision with all that I know today?

Texas hired Charlie Strong after the 2013 season and turned over to him via Mack Brown a Texas team that the three previous seasons had gone…

2011:  8 – 5
2012:  9 – 4
2013:  8 – 5

…which is…

25 Total Wins or 8.33 wins a season

….and right now Charlie Strong is on track to post over his three seasons at Texas something like…

18 Total Wins or 6 wins a season

Sorry but 2.33 LESS wins a season at a place like TEXAS over the same time period is nothing short of a…

Complete Freaking Disaster

….and therein lies the question that decision-makers at Texas must ask themselves:

Would we hire Charlie Strong again today knowing what we know today?

This all may be moot though because if Texas loses to Iowa State then it will be OVER before the Sun rises on Sunday morning!

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2.  Steve Addazio, Boston College – In four seasons at Boston College head coach Steve Addazio has posted records of…

Overall: 20 – 24

ACC:  8 – 19

…and the Eagles just got whipped by Clemson at home by a score of 56 – 10 and barring a miracle of sorts with these games left to be played…

Syracuse
At NC State
Louisville
At Florida State
UConn
At Wake Forest

…that sees BC win at least THREE of their last SIX games one would have to think Boston College will be looking for a new head football coach come December…right?

Here’s a thought…maybe Boston College should hire former BC head football coach Jeff Jagodzinski who posted a record of…

20 – 8

…in two seasons on the job and who is now living in the Atlanta area.

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3.  Tim DeRuyter, Fresno State – With the loss to Nevada on Saturday Fresno State head coach Tim DeRuyter’s records over the past three seasons has fallen to…

Overall:  10 – 22

MWC:  7 – 11

….and the word we are hearing from the San Joaquin Valley is that the Bulldogs will be looking for a new head coach unless DeRuyter can get the ship righted in a Helluva hurry, and things don’t get any easier with a game against San Diego State on Saturday which would be the perfect opponent to get things turned around against for Fresno.

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4.  Mark Helfrich, Oregon – Since Oregon played in the National Championship Game after the 2014 season the Ducks under Mark Helfrich have posted records of..

Overall:  11 – 8

Pac-12:  7 – 5

….but Helfrich’s record against Power 5 Conference schools the past two seasons now stands at…

10 – 7

…..and in case Mark Helfrich doesn’t know it…

That kind of record will NOT be tolerated in Eugene and we have heard that there are some folks “around” the Oregon football program that are thinking an ENTIRE house cleaning of Oregon might be in order with a new coach bringing in entire new set of coaches that can shake a place us that has gotten “way Damn too comfortable for lots of coaches that are making a Helluva lot of money!”

Our opinion….anything less than 8 wins and Mark Helfrich and his ENTIRE coaching staff is DONE in Eugene and Oregon will be out looking for an innovative, cutting-edge, aggressive, attacking, and borderline crazy coach to reinvigorate the Oregon football program. We know at least three current crazy head coaches that would be a GREAT fit at Oregon!

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5.  Brian Kelly, Notre Dame – Since Notre Dame got its ass whipped by Alabama in the 2012-13 National Title Game the Irish under Brian Kelly have posted records of…

2013:  9 – 4
2014:  8 – 5
2015:  10 – 3
2016:  2 – 4

29 – 16  (.644)

….and in case Brian Kelly doesn’t know it a .644% winning percentage at Notre Dame will get your ass fired and that is what Kelly is now facing if the 2016 continues to unravel….

Getting His Ass Fired!

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Luckily for Brian Kelly and Notre Dame the SOFTEST thing this side of Charmin toilet paper is coming to South Bend on Saturday…

The Stanford Football Team

…which has…

Given Up – 85 Points

Scored – 22 Points

…in the last two games against Washington and Washington State and it doesn’t take a genius to know that if…

Notre Dame throws on EVERY down they will hang 50-plus points on Stanford!

Since the SOFT AS WARM BUTTER Stanford Cardinal should be an EASY win for Notre Dame and Kelly which would raise the Irish record to…

3 – 4

…on the season the question is can Notre Dame win THREE of their last FIVE games for Brian Kelly to have ANY chance to hang onto job playing…

Miami
Navy
Army
Virginia Tech
At USC

NO…is the answer to that question in our opinion and we see Notre Dame finishing with a record of…

4 – 8 or 5 – 7

…in 2016 and if that happens the Notre Dame Fighting Irish will be looking for a new head football coach come early December!

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6.  Will Muschamp, South Carolina – With the loss to Georgia on Sunday Will Muschamp’s record at USC fell to…

2 – 4

…and the Gamecocks still have games left against…

UMass
Tennessee
Missouri
At Florida
Western Carolina
At Clemson

Our guess is South Carolina finishes with a 4 – 8 record in 2016 and Will Muschamp’s rear-end will still be on the Hot Seat heading into the 2017 season.

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7.  Paul Johnson, Georgia Tech – With the Georgia Tech loss to Pitt on Saturday that drops Paul Johnson’s record in 2016 to…

3 – 3

….and over the past two seasons Johnson’s records now stand at…

Overall:  6 – 12

ACC:  2 – 10

….and the word that Coaches Hot Seat members that live in the Atlanta area are hearing is that save a major turnaround Georgia Tech will be looking for a new head football coach in a couple of months.

Up next for Tech….

Georgia Southern

….which is a MUST win in every sense of the word MUST for Paul Johnson!

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8.  Darrell Hazell, Purdue – Purdue and Darrell Hazell got a nice win over Illinois in overtime on Saturday but then it was…

Illinois

…the Boilermakers beat to raise their record in 2016 to 3 – 2 with these games still left on the schedule:

Iowa
At Nebraska
Penn State
At Minnesota
Northwestern
Wisconsin
At Indiana

Darrell Hazell needs THREE wins in his last SEVEN games to get to SIX wins and although Purdue is playing slightly better than they played last season we don’t think there is a chance in Hell the Boilermakers win SIX games in 2016!

Keep fighting Darrell Hazell because potential future employers are watching how this Purdue team FINISHES the 2016 season whether you are the head coach of the school next year or not!

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9.  Chad Morris, SMU – In our minds one of the biggest disappointments the last couple of college football seasons has been Chad Morris at SMU who has posted records of…

Overall:  4 – 14

AAC:  1 – 9

….and now at 2 – 4 on the 2016 season and these games still left to be played…

At Tulane
Memphis
At East Carolina
USF
Navy

….things could get a lot more UGLY for Chad Morris who really needs to get TWO more wins in 2016 to at least get FOUR wins overall to double his win total from last season!

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10.  Mark Stoops, Kentucky – With a win over Vanderbilt on Saturday Mark Stoops’ Kentucky football team now has a record of 3 – 3 on the season and an off-week before playing a VERY beatable team in Mississippi State at home on October 22 and then a game against another VERY beatable team at Missouri on October 29 which would give UK 5 wins….but can Mark Stoops find another win in their last FOUR games against…

Georgia
At Tennessee
Austin Peay
At Louisville

…to get to SIX wins overall?

We would sure Hell hope Kentucky can beat Austin Peay at home to get to SIX wins on the season and get Stoops’ rear-end off the Hot Seat but first things first…

Kentucky MUST BEAT Mississippi State and Missouri!

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 12, 2016 – Helen Keller

 

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“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”

And

“Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.”

And

“Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.”

And

“I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.”

And

“It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision.”

And

“Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood.”

And

“Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing.”

And

“True happiness… is not attained through self-gratification, but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.”

And

“My share of the work may be limited, but the fact that it is work makes it precious.”

And

“Never bend your head. Always hold it high. Look the world straight in the eye.”

And

“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.”

And

“People do not like to think. If one thinks, one must reach conclusions. Conclusions are not always pleasant.”

And

“The highest result of education is tolerance.”

And

“Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.”

And

“We can do anything we want to if we stick to it long enough.”

And

“While they were saying among themselves it cannot be done, it was done.”

And

“One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.”

And

“We differ, blind and seeing, one from another, not in our senses, but in the use we make of them, in the imagination and courage with which we seek wisdom beyond the senses.”

And

“Tyranny cannot defeat the power of ideas.”

And

“Miss Sullivan touched my forehead and spelled with decided emphasis, “Think.”  In a flash I knew that the word was the name of the process that was going on in my head. This was my first conscious perception of an abstract idea.  For a long time I was still … trying to find a meaning for “love” in the light of this new idea. The sun had been under a cloud all day, and there had been brief showers; but suddenly the sun broke forth in all its southern splendour.  Again I asked my teacher, “Is this not love?”

“Love is something like the clouds that were in the sky before the sun came out,” she replied. Then in simpler words than these, which at that time I could not have understood, she explained:

“You cannot touch the clouds, you know; but you feel the rain and know how glad the flowers and the thirsty earth are to have it after a hot day. You cannot touch love either; but you feel the sweetness that it pours into everything. Without love you would not be happy or want to play.”

The beautiful truth burst upon my mind — I felt that there were invisible lines stretched between my spirit and the spirits of others.”

And

“No matter how dull, or how mean, or how wise a man is, he feels that happiness is his indisputable right.”

And

“A happy life consists not in the absence, but in the mastery of hardships.”

And

“Many persons have a wrong idea of what constitutes true happiness. It is not attained through self-gratification but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.”

Wikipedia:  Helen Keller

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, October 11, 2016 – Carl Sagan

 

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“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.”

And

“But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”

And

“For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.”

And

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

And

“I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students.”

And

“I can find in my undergraduate classes, bright students who do not know that the stars rise and set at night, or even that the Sun is a star.”

And

“If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits?”

And

“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

And

“Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere.”

And

“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.”

And

“Personally, I would be delighted if there were a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out.”

And

“Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”

And

“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

And

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”

And

“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.”

And

“The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.”

And

“The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent.”

And

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”

and

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

And

“Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.”

And

“The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what’s true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth — never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key.”

And

“Who is more humble? The scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever it has to teach us, or somebody who says everything in this book must be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of all the human beings involved?”

And

“The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion and politics, but it is not the path to knowledge; it has no place in the endeavor of science.”

And

“Matter is composed chiefly of nothing.”

And

“Other things being equal, it is better to be smart than to be stupid.”

And

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

And

“Humans are very good at dreaming, although you’d never know it from your television.”

And

“In the fabric of space and in the nature of matter, as in a great work of art, there is, written small, the artist’s signature.”

And

“We on Earth have just awakened to the great oceans of space and time from which we have emerged. We are the legacy of 15 billion years of cosmic evolution. We have a choice: We can enhance life and come to know the universe that made us, or we can squander our 15 billion-year heritage in meaningless self-destruction. What happens in the first second of the next cosmic year depends on what we do, here and now, with our intelligence and our knowledge of the cosmos.”

And

“As a boy Kepler had been captured by a vision of cosmic splendour, a harmony of the worlds which he sought so tirelessly all his life. Harmony in this world eluded him. His three laws of planetary motion represent, we now know, a real harmony of the worlds, but to Kepler they were only incidental to his quest for a cosmic system based on the Perfect Solids, a system which, it turns out, existed only in his mind. Yet from his work, we have found that scientific laws pervade all of nature, that the same rules apply on Earth as in the skies, that we can find a resonance, a harmony, between the way we think and the way the world works. When he found that his long cherished beliefs did not agree with the most precise observations, he accepted the uncomfortable facts, he preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions. That is the heart of science.”

And

“Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

And

“A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the Moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the Moon these days.”

And

“Education on the value of free speech and the other freedoms reserved by the Bill of Rights, about what happens when you don’t have them, and about how to exercise and protect them, should be an essential prerequisite for being an American citizen — or indeed a citizen of any nation, the more so to the degree that such rights remain unprotected. If we can’t think for ourselves, if we’re unwilling to question authority, then we’re just putty in the hands of those in power. But if the citizens are educated and form their own opinions, then those in power work for us. In every country, we should be teaching our children the scientific method and the reasons for a Bill of Rights. With it comes a certain decency, humility and community spirit. In the demon-haunted world that we inhabit by virtue of being human, this may be all that stands between us and the enveloping darkness.”

And

“When we consider the founders of our nation: Jefferson, Washington, Samuel and John Adams, Madison and Monroe, Benjamin Franklin, Tom Paine and many others; we have before us a list of at least ten and maybe even dozens of great political leaders. They were well educated. Products of the European Enlightenment, they were students of history. They knew human fallibility and weakness and corruptibility. They were fluent in the English language. They wrote their own speeches. They were realistic and practical, and at the same time motivated by high principles. They were not checking the pollsters on what to think this week. They knew what to think. They were comfortable with long-term thinking, planning even further ahead than the next election. They were self-sufficient, not requiring careers as politicians or lobbyists to make a living. They were able to bring out the best in us. They were interested in and, at least two of them, fluent in science. They attempted to set a course for the United States into the far future — not so much by establishing laws as by setting limits on what kinds of laws could be passed. The Constitution and its Bill of Rights have done remarkably well, constituting, despite human weaknesses, a machine able, more often than not, to correct its own trajectory. At that time, there were only about two and a half million citizens of the United States. Today there are about a hundred times more. So if there were ten people of the caliber of Thomas Jefferson then, there ought to be 10 x 100 = 1,000 Thomas Jefferson’s today. Where are they?”

Wikipedia:  Carl Sagan

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, October 10, 2016 – Frederick Douglass

 

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“A man’s character always takes its hue, more or less, from the form and color of things about him.”

And

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”

And

“Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.”

And

“I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence.”

And

“I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress.”

And

“A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.”

And

“One and God make a majority.”

And

“I didn’t know I was a slave until I found out I couldn’t do the things I wanted.”

And

“The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppose.”

And

“A gentleman will not insult me, and no man not a gentleman can insult me.”

And

“To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker.”

And

“The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous.”

And

“A little learning, indeed, may be a dangerous thing, but the want of learning is a calamity to any people.”

And

“The white man’s happiness cannot be purchased by the black man’s misery.”

And

“Without a struggle, there can be no progress.”

And

“It is not light that we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.”

And

“Man’s greatness consists in his ability to do and the proper application of his powers to things needed to be done.”

And

“People might not get all they work for in this world, but they must certainly work for all they get.”

And

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral one; or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what a people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. Men may not get all they pay for in this world; but they must pay for all they get. If we ever get free from all the oppressions and wrongs heaped upon us, we must pay for their removal. We must do this by labor, by suffering, by sacrifice, and, if needs be, by our lives, and the lives of others.”

And

“No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck.”

And

“Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.”

And

“Whatever the future may have in store for us, one thing is certain — this new revolution in human thought will never go backward. When a great truth once gets abroad in the world, no power on earth can imprison it, or prescribe its limits, or suppress it. It is bound to go on till it becomes the thought of the world. Such a truth is woman’s right to equal liberty with man. She was born with it. It was hers before she comprehended it. It is inscribed upon all the powers and faculties of her soul, and no custom, law, or usage can ever destroy it. Now that it has got fairly fixed in the minds of the few, it is bound to become fixed in the minds of the many, and be supported at last by a great cloud of witnesses, which no man can number and no power can withstand.”

And

“Mr. Lincoln was not only a great President, but a great man — too great to be small in anything. In his company I was never in any way reminded of my humble origin, or of my unpopular color.”

And

“I look upon my departure from Colonel Lloyd’s plantation as one of the most interesting events of my life. It is possible, and even quite probable, that but for the mere circumstance of being removed from that plantation to Baltimore, I should have to-day, instead of being here seated by my own table, in the enjoyment of freedom and the happiness of home, writing this Narrative, been confined in the galling chains of slavery. Going to live at Baltimore laid the foundation, and opened the gateway, to all my subsequent prosperity. I have ever regarded it as the first plain manifestation of that kind providence which has ever since attended me, and marked my life with so many favors. I regarded the selection of myself as being somewhat remarkable. There were a number of slave children that might have been sent from the plantation to Baltimore. There were those younger, those older, and those of the same age. I was chosen from among them all, and was the first, last, and only choice.”

Wikipedia Page: Frederick Douglass

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 9, 2016 – George Washington

 

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“The power under the Constitution will always be in the people. It is entrusted for certain defined purposes, and for a certain limited period, to representatives of their own choosing; and whenever it is executed contrary to their interest, or not agreeable to their wishes, their servants can, and undoubtedly will, be recalled.”

And

“A slender acquaintance with the world must convince every man that actions, not words, are the true criterion of the attachment of friends.”

And

“Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.”

And

“Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence.”

And

“Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable; procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.”

And

“Experience teaches us that it is much easier to prevent an enemy from posting themselves than it is to dislodge them after they have got possession.”

And

“Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”

And

“Happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected.”

And

“I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man.”

And

“If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”

And

“It may be laid down as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a Free Government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal services to the defense of it.”

And

“Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.”

And

“Nothing can be more hurtful to the service, than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army the superiority over another.”

And

“To be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace.”

And

“Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light.”

And

“War – An act of violence whose object is to constrain the enemy, to accomplish our will.”

And

“Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.”

And

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or die.” George Washington, Address to the Continental Army before the Battle of Long Island, 27 August 1776

And

“Nothing is a greater stranger to my breast, or a sin that my soul more abhors, than that black and detestable one, ingratitude.”

And

“There is a Destiny which has the control of our actions, not to be resisted by the strongest efforts of Human Nature.”

And

“The only stipulations I shall contend for are, that in all things you shall do as you please. I will do the same; and that no ceremony may be used or any restraint be imposed on any one.”

And

“Rise early, that by habit it may become familiar, agreeable, healthy, and profitable. It may, for a while, be irksome to do this, but that will wear off; and the practice will produce a rich harvest forever thereafter; whether in public or private walks of life.”

And

“The Citizens of the United States of America have a right to applaud themselves for giving to Mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy: a policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.”

And

“A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined; to which end a uniform and well-digested plan is requisite; and their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories as tend to render them independent of others for essential, particularly military, supplies.”

And

“We have abundant reason to rejoice, that, in this land, the light of truth and reason has triumphed over the power of bigotry and superstition, and that every person may here worship God according to the dictates of his own heart. In this enlightened age, & in this land of equal liberty, it is our boast, that a man’s religious tenets will not forfeit the protection of the laws, nor deprive him of the right of attaining & holding the highest offices that are known in the United States.”

Wikipedia:  George Washington

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 7, 2016 – George S. Patton

 

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“Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.”

And

“Always do everything you ask of those you command.”

And

“Americans love to fight. All real Americans love the sting of battle.”

And

“Americans play to win at all times. I wouldn’t give a hoot and hell for a man who lost and laughed. That’s why Americans have never lost nor ever lose a war.”

And

“Better to fight for something than live for nothing.”

And

“Courage is fear holding on a minute longer.”

And

“Don’t tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results.”

And

“I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom.”

And

“If a man has done his best, what else is there?”

And

“If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.”

And

“If we take the generally accepted definition of bravery as a quality which knows no fear, I have never seen a brave man. All men are frightened. The more intelligent they are, the more they are frightened.”

And

“It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.”

And

“Nobody ever defended anything successfully, there is only attack and attack and attack some more.”

And

“The time to take counsel of your fears is before you make an important battle decision. That’s the time to listen to every fear you can imagine! When you have collected all the facts and fears and made your decision, turn off all your fears and go ahead!”

And

“There is only one sort of discipline, perfect discipline.”

And

“We herd sheep, we drive cattle, we lead people. Lead me, follow me, or get out of my way.”

And

“You need to overcome the tug of people against you as you reach for high goals.”

Wikipedia Page:  George S. Patton

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 6, 2016 – Ernie Banks

 

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“It’s a beautiful day for a ball game…. Let’s play two!” 

And

“But it all comes down to friendship, treating people right.”

And

“I learned from Mr. Wrigley, early in my career, that loyalty wins and it creates friendships. I saw it work for him in his business.”

And

“It’s a kind of philosophy of my own life, to create the energy enough to keep on going.”

And

“Loyalty and friendship, which is to me the same, created all the wealth that I’ve ever thought I’d have.”

And

“Mr. Wrigley believed in this: Put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket. They don’t do that today. This is the old-fashioned way I’m talking about. He carried it on to his business. Do one thing and stay with it.”

And

“The riches of the game are in the thrills, not the money.”

Wikipedia Page:  Ernie Banks

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, October 5, 2016 – John Updike

 

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“A leader is one who, out of madness or goodness, volunteers to take upon himself the woe of the people. There are few men so foolish, hence the erratic quality of leadership in the world.”

And

‘Creativity is merely a plus name for regular activity. Any activity becomes creative when the doer cares about doing it right, or better.”

And

‘Dreams come true; without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them.”

And

“Golf appeals to the idiot in us and the child. Just how childlike golf players become is proven by their frequent inability to count past five.”

And

“If men do not keep on speaking terms with children, they cease to be men, and become merely machines for eating and for earning money.”

And

“Sex is like money; only too much is enough.”

And

“We are most alive when we’re in love.”

And

“When I write, I aim in my mind not toward New York but toward a vague spot a little to the east of Kansas.”

And

“I love my government not least for the extent to which it leaves me alone.”

And

“We take our bearings, daily, from others. To be sane is, to a great extent, to be sociable.”

And

“I secretly understood: the primitive appeal of the hearth. Television is — its irresistible charm — a fire.”

And

‘Four years was enough of Harvard. I still had a lot to learn, but had been given the liberating notion that now I could teach myself.”

And

“It was true of my generation, that the movies were terribly vivid and instructive. There were all kinds of things you learned. Like the 19th century novels, you saw how other social classes lived — especially the upper classes. So in a funny way, they taught you manners almost. But also moral manners. The gallantry of a Gary Cooper or an Errol Flynn or Jimmy Stewart. It was ethical instruction of a sort that the church purported to be giving you, but in a much less digestible form. Instead of these remote, crabbed biblical verses, you had contemporary people acting out moral dilemmas. Just the grace, the grace of those stars — not just the dancing stars, but the way they all moved with a certain grace. All that sank deep into my head, and my soul.”

And

“In the old movies, yes, there always was the happy ending and order was restored. As it is in Shakespeare’s plays. It’s no disgrace to, in the end, restore order. And punish the wicked and, in some way, reward the righteous.”

And

“Rain is grace; rain is the sky descending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.”

And

“The essential support and encouragement comes from within, arising out of the mad notion that your society needs to know what only you can tell it.”

And

“America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.”

And

“Writers may be disreputable, incorrigible, early to decay or late to bloom but they dare to go it alone.”

And

“Being naked approaches being revolutionary; going barefoot is mere populism.”

Wikipedia Page:  John Updike

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