Monthly Archive: February 2017

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, February 8, 2017 – Napoleon Bonaparte

 

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“A man will fight harder for his interests than for his rights.”

And

“A revolution can be neither made nor stopped. The only thing that can be done is for one of several of its children to give it a direction by dint of victories.”

And

“A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of colored ribbon.”

And

“Ability is nothing without opportunity.”

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“Courage is like love; it must have hope for nourishment.”

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“Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.”

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“Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets.”

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“Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever.”

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“Great ambition is the passion of a great character. Those endowed with it may perform very good or very bad acts. All depends on the principles which direct them.”

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“He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat.”

And

“I love power. But it is as an artist that I love it. I love it as a musician loves his violin, to draw out its sounds and chords and harmonies.”

And

“If you want a thing done well, do it yourself”.

And

“Impossible is a word to be found only in the dictionary of fools.”

And

“It requires more courage to suffer than to die.”

And

“Men are moved by two levers only: fear and self interest.”

And

“Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide.”

And

“One must change one’s tactics every ten years if one wishes to maintain one’s superiority.”

And

“Take time to deliberate, but when the time for action has arrived, stop thinking and go in.”

And

“The battlefield is a scene of constant chaos. The winner will be the one who controls that chaos, both his own and the enemies.”

And

“The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue.”

And

“The people to fear are not those who disagree with you, but those who disagree with you and are too cowardly to let you know.”

And

“The strong man is the one who is able to intercept at will the communication between the senses and the mind.”

And

“The truest wisdom is a resolute determination.”

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“To do all that one is able to do, is to be a man; to do all that one would like to do, is to be a god.”

And

“Victory belongs to the most persevering.”

And

“When soldiers have been baptized in the fire of a battle-field, they have all one rank in my eyes.”

And

“With audacity one can undertake anything, but not do everything.”

And

“If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks, glory would become the prey of mediocre minds…. I have made all the calculations; fate will do the rest.”

And

“Success is the most convincing talker in the world.”

And

“Impatience is a great obstacle to success; he who treats everything with brusqueness gathers nothing, or only immature fruit which will never ripen.”

And

“The fool has one great advantage over a man of sense — he is always satisfied with himself.”

And

“How many seemingly impossible things have been accomplished by resolute men because they had to do, or die.”

And

“At the beginning of a campaign it is important to consider whether or not to move forward; but when one has taken the offensive it is necessary to maintain it to the last extremity.”

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“In a battle, as in a siege, the art consists in concentrating very heavy fire on a particular point. The line of battle once established, the one who has the ability to concentrate an unlooked for mass of artillery suddenly and unexpectedly on one of these points is sure to carry the day.”

And

“The secret of great battles consists in knowing how to deploy and concentrate at the right time.”

And

“A man who has no consideration for the needs of his men ought never to be given command.”

Wikipedia:  Napoleon Bonaparte

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, February 7, 2017 – Carl Sagan

 

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“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.”

And

“But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”

And

“For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.”

And

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

And

“I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students.”

And

“I can find in my undergraduate classes, bright students who do not know that the stars rise and set at night, or even that the Sun is a star.”

And

“If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits?”

And

“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

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“Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere.”

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“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.”

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“Personally, I would be delighted if there were a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out.”

And

“Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”

And

“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

And

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”

And

“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.”

And

“The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.”

And

“The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent.”

And

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”

and

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

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“Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.”

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“The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what’s true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth — never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key.”

And

“Who is more humble? The scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever it has to teach us, or somebody who says everything in this book must be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of all the human beings involved?”

And

“The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion and politics, but it is not the path to knowledge; it has no place in the endeavor of science.”

And

“Matter is composed chiefly of nothing.”

And

“Other things being equal, it is better to be smart than to be stupid.”

And

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

And

“Humans are very good at dreaming, although you’d never know it from your television.”

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“In the fabric of space and in the nature of matter, as in a great work of art, there is, written small, the artist’s signature.”

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“We on Earth have just awakened to the great oceans of space and time from which we have emerged. We are the legacy of 15 billion years of cosmic evolution. We have a choice: We can enhance life and come to know the universe that made us, or we can squander our 15 billion-year heritage in meaningless self-destruction. What happens in the first second of the next cosmic year depends on what we do, here and now, with our intelligence and our knowledge of the cosmos.”

And

“As a boy Kepler had been captured by a vision of cosmic splendour, a harmony of the worlds which he sought so tirelessly all his life. Harmony in this world eluded him. His three laws of planetary motion represent, we now know, a real harmony of the worlds, but to Kepler they were only incidental to his quest for a cosmic system based on the Perfect Solids, a system which, it turns out, existed only in his mind. Yet from his work, we have found that scientific laws pervade all of nature, that the same rules apply on Earth as in the skies, that we can find a resonance, a harmony, between the way we think and the way the world works. When he found that his long cherished beliefs did not agree with the most precise observations, he accepted the uncomfortable facts, he preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions. That is the heart of science.”

And

“Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

And

“A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the Moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the Moon these days.”

And

“Education on the value of free speech and the other freedoms reserved by the Bill of Rights, about what happens when you don’t have them, and about how to exercise and protect them, should be an essential prerequisite for being an American citizen — or indeed a citizen of any nation, the more so to the degree that such rights remain unprotected. If we can’t think for ourselves, if we’re unwilling to question authority, then we’re just putty in the hands of those in power. But if the citizens are educated and form their own opinions, then those in power work for us. In every country, we should be teaching our children the scientific method and the reasons for a Bill of Rights. With it comes a certain decency, humility and community spirit. In the demon-haunted world that we inhabit by virtue of being human, this may be all that stands between us and the enveloping darkness.”

And

“When we consider the founders of our nation: Jefferson, Washington, Samuel and John Adams, Madison and Monroe, Benjamin Franklin, Tom Paine and many others; we have before us a list of at least ten and maybe even dozens of great political leaders. They were well educated. Products of the European Enlightenment, they were students of history. They knew human fallibility and weakness and corruptibility. They were fluent in the English language. They wrote their own speeches. They were realistic and practical, and at the same time motivated by high principles. They were not checking the pollsters on what to think this week. They knew what to think. They were comfortable with long-term thinking, planning even further ahead than the next election. They were self-sufficient, not requiring careers as politicians or lobbyists to make a living. They were able to bring out the best in us. They were interested in and, at least two of them, fluent in science. They attempted to set a course for the United States into the far future — not so much by establishing laws as by setting limits on what kinds of laws could be passed. The Constitution and its Bill of Rights have done remarkably well, constituting, despite human weaknesses, a machine able, more often than not, to correct its own trajectory. At that time, there were only about two and a half million citizens of the United States. Today there are about a hundred times more. So if there were ten people of the caliber of Thomas Jefferson then, there ought to be 10 x 100 = 1,000 Thomas Jefferson’s today. Where are they?”

Wikipedia:  Carl Sagan

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, February 6, 2017 – Paul Brown

 

PaulBrown778

“A winner never whines.”

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“Football is a game of errors. The team that makes the fewest errors in a game usually wins.”

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“The key to winning is poise under stress.”

And

“What we have currently available is what we have available.”

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“When you win, say nothing. When you lose, say less.”

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“You can learn a line from a win and a book from a defeat.”

Wikipedia:  Paul Brown

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, February 5, 2017 – Amelia Earhart

 

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“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

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“Better do a good deed near at home than go far away to burn incense.”

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“Courage is the price that Life exacts for granting peace, The soul that knows it not, knows no release from little things.”

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“Flying might not be all plain sailing, but the fun of it is worth the price.”

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“I want to do it because I want to do it.”

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“In soloing – as in other activities – it is far easier to start something than it is to finish it.”

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“Never do things others can do and will do if there are things others cannot do or will not do.”

And

“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.”

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“Obviously I faced the possibility of not returning when first I considered going. Once faced and settled there really wasn’t any good reason to refer to it.”

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“Please know that I am aware of the hazards. I want to do it because I want to do it. Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail, their failure must be a challenge to others.”

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“The more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one’s appreciation of fundamental things like home, and love, and understanding companionship.”

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“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward.”

And

“The most effective way to do it, is to do it.”

And

“The woman who can create her own job is the woman who will win fame and fortune.”

And

“There are two kinds of stones, as everyone knows, one of which rolls.”

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“There is so much that must be done in a civilized barbarism like war.”

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“Women must pay for everything. They do get more glory than men for comparable feats, but, they also get more notoriety when they crash.”

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“Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail their failure must be but a challenge to others.”

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“Women, like men, should try to do the impossible. And when they fail, their failure should be a challenge to others.”

And

“The more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one’s appreciation of fundamental things like home, and love, and understanding companionship.”

And

“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

And

“No kind action ever stops with itself. One kind action leads to another. Good example is followed. A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees. The greatest work that kindness does to others is that it makes them kind themselves.”

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“In my life I had come to realize that when things were going very well indeed it was just the time to anticipate trouble. And, conversely, I learned from pleasant experience that at the most despairing crisis, when all looked sour beyond words, some delightful “break” was apt to lurk just around the corner.”

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“The soul’s dominion? Each time we make a choice, we pay with courage to behold restless day and count it fair.”

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“Anticipation, I suppose, sometimes exceeds realization.”

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“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward.”

And

“Worry retards reaction and makes clear-cut decisions impossible.”

And

“…decide…whether or not the goal is worth the risks involved. If it is, stop worrying….”

And

“Not much more than a month ago I was on the other shore of the Pacific, looking westward. This evening, I looked eastward over the Pacific. In those fast-moving days which have intervened, the whole width of the world has passed behind us -except this broad ocean. I shall be glad when we have the hazards of its navigation behind us.” — Amelia Earhart, several days before she left for Howland Island and disappeared

Wikipedia: Amelia Earhart

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, February 4, 2017 – Frank Sinatra

 

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“I would like to be remembered as a man who had a wonderful time living life, a man who had good friends, fine family – and I don’t think I could ask for anything more than that, actually.”

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“I’m for whatever gets you through the night.”

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“I’m gonna live till I die.”

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“May you live to be 100 and may the last voice you hear be mine.”

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“People often remark that I’m pretty lucky. Luck is only important in so far as getting the chance to sell yourself at the right moment. After that, you’ve got to have talent and know how to use it.”

And

“The best revenge is massive success.”

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“Whatever else has been said about me personally is unimportant. When I sing, I believe. I’m honest.”

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“I’m not one of those complicated, mixed-up cats. I’m not looking for the secret to life…. I just go on from day to day, taking what comes.”

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“What I do with my life is of my own doing. I live it the best way I can.”

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“I’m supposed to have a Ph.D. on the subject of women. But the truth is I’ve flunked more often than not. I’m very fond of women; I admire them. But, like all men, I don’t understand them.”

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“For years I’ve nursed a secret desire to spend the Fourth of July in a double hammock with a swingin’ redheaded broad … but I could never find me a double hammock.”

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“The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.”

Wikipedia: Frank Sinatra

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, February 3, 2017 – Don Shula

 

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“The superior man blames himself.  The inferior man blames others.”

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“One thing I never want to be accused of is not working.”

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“I don’t know any other way to lead but by example.”

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“Sure, luck means a lot in football.  Not having a good quarterback is bad luck.”

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“I think what coaching is all about, is taking players and analyzing there ability, put them in a position where they can excel within the framework of the team winning.  And I hope that I’ve done that in my 33 years as a head coach.”

And

“The ultimate goal is victory.  And if you refuse to work as hard as you possibly can toward that aim, or if you do anything that keeps you from achieving that goal, then you are just cheating yourself.”

And

“You know it’s only 50 miles from Grand River to Canton, but it took me 67 years to travel that distance.”

Wikipedia Page:  Don Shula

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, February 2, 2017 – LeRoy Neiman

 

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“I had a go at changing history – maybe not all by myself – I fought at the battle of Normandy, I slogged through the Ardennes, and I celebrated the liberation of Paris on the streets with beautiful French girls throwing flowers at me. I said good-bye to my first true love and discovered what I really wanted to do with my life.”

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‘Every time I started painting it was like a new experience, but they all came out the same.”

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“I hold doors open for all the women. Men can open the doors for themselves.”

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“Imagination comes of not having things.”

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“Boxing is my real passion. I can go to ballet, theatre, movies, or other sporting events… and nothing is like the fights to me. I’m excited by the visual beauty of it. A boxer can look so spectacular by doing a good job.”

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“I’ve met and sketched most of the great athletes from the past five decades and their movement, grace and energy have kept me captivated over the years. That’s what the ancient Greeks first saw and that’s what caught my interest.”

And

“I always stayed in tune with my own ambitions and attitudes and I’m still my intractable old self, for better or worse.”

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“Eating is one of the great beauties in life. One of my favorite recreations… eating with friends, the service, the ambience.”

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“But ‘Playboy’ was liberating. I was drawn to it and went for it full throttle.”

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“I guess I created LeRoy Neiman. Nobody else told me how to do it. Well, I’m a believer in the theory that the artist is as important as his work.”

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“It’s a nice feeling to go out in the world and look for excellence – the best in man. My subject is very valid. It’s about people, and about life.”

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“I’ve got the public. I don’t care about the critics. I did at one time. I don’t any more. I did when I needed compliments. But if you get a lot of compliments, you don’t need a critic to tell you, ‘This should be done another way.'”

And

“The businessman says ‘If I don’t do it first, somebody else will.’ The artist says ‘If I don’t do it first, nobody else will.'”

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“I can easily ignore my detractors and feel the people who respond favorably.”

And

“It’s been fun. I’ve had a lucky life. Art has made me pull the best out of myself.”

And

“I don’t know if I’m an impressionist or an expressionist. You can call me an American first… I’ve been labeled doing neimanism, so that’s what it is, I guess.”

And

“I’ve zeroed in on what you would call action and excellence… Everybody who does anything to try to succeed has to give the best of themselves, and art has made me pull the best out of myself.”

And

“The people who love my paintings, that respond to them the most, they’re spectators, they’re not viewers.”

And

“I draw all the time. Drawing is my backbone. I don’t think a painter has to be able to draw, I just think that if you draw, you better draw well.”

And

“I love the passion you go through while you’re creating.”

And

“You can’t take yourself too seriously.”

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“No, I never had any dreams. The process of art is a dream in itself. The artist just doesn’t… you work out something. It’s yours. You don’t have to go to sleep to do that. You do that on the canvas.”

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“When I paint, I seriously consider the public presence of a person – the surface facade. I am less concerned with how people look when they wake up or how they act at home. A person’s public presence reflects his own efforts at image development.”

And

“‘Playboy’ made the good life a reality for me and made it the subject matter of my paintings – not affluence and luxury as such, but joie de vivre itself.”

And

“It has been difficult to hold onto many paintings but I have retained a few. Possibly the current favorite is titled ‘Big Band’ completed in 2005. It measures 13 feet x 9 feet. It has 18 nearly life size recognizable portraits of the biggest jazz stars that I knew and saw perform in the 1950s, ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and includes Wynton Marsalis.”

And

“The most important thing is to just do it. If I work at a higher level I have responsibility to do better than what I’ve done before. Sometimes the best happens – beyond possibility. Just do it. Can’t worry about it.”

And

“You know what I like about San Francisco? The women are beautiful, fashionable and smart. San Francisco is one of the only cities I like to visit. I love New York and Chicago – I studied there, and L.A. has the same people as New York.”

And

“There’s no greatest moment in the arts. It’s a life, it’s a continuity thing. You can’t have a great moment because it’s spiritual. It’s a belief, it’s a calling. If you’re an artist, doing your own thing on your own, it’s while you’re doing it that counts. It’s a process. If you get too elated, you can get too depressed.”

And

“The big shock of my life was Abstract Expressionism – Pollock, de Kooning, those guys. It changed my work. I was an academically trained student, and suddenly you could pour paint, smear it on, broom it on!”

Wikipedia: LeRoy Neiman

www.leroyneiman.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, February 1, 2017 – Aristotle

 

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“All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.”

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“All men by nature desire knowledge.”

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“Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.”

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“Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.”

And

“No great genius has ever existed without some touch of madness.”

And

“The energy of the mind is the essence of life.”

And

“You will never do anything in this world without courage. It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.”

And

“He who has overcome his fears will truly be free.”

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“Well begun is half done.”

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“Man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all.”

And

‘Any one can get angry — that is easy — or give or spend money; but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for every one, nor is it easy.”

And

“Man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all.”

And

“Again, men in general desire the good, and not merely what their fathers had.”

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“A state is not a mere society, having a common place, established for the prevention of mutual crime and for the sake of exchange…. Political society exists for the sake of noble actions, and not of mere companionship.”

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“The basis of a democratic state is liberty.”

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“With regard to excellence, it is not enough to know, but we must try to have and use it.”

Wikipedia: Aristotle

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