Daily Archive: March 3, 2017

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, March 3, 2017 – Julius Caesar

 

“As a rule, men worry more about what they can’t see than about what they can.”

And

“Experience is the teacher of all things.”

And

“Fortune, which has a great deal of power in other matters but especially in war, can bring about great changes in a situation through very slight forces.”

And

“I came, I saw, I conquered.”

And

“I had rather be first in a village than second at Rome. “

Amd

“I love the name of honor, more than I fear death.”

And

“It is not these well-fed long-haired men that I fear, but the pale and the hungry-looking.”

And

“Men are nearly always willing to believe what they wish.”

And

“No one is so brave that he is not disturbed by something unexpected.”

And

“What we wish, we readily believe, and what we ourselves think, we imagine others think also.”

And

Julius Caesar Quotes by William Shakespeare:

“Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.”

And

“Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.”

And

“Et tu, Brutus?”

And

“Of all the wonders that I have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
(Act II, Scene 2)”

And

“Beware the ides of March.”

And

“The ides of March are come.
Soothsayer: Ay, Caesar; but not gone.”

And

“Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him;
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bones,
So let it be with Caesar … The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it …
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,
(For Brutus is an honourable man;
So are they all; all honourable men)
Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral …
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man….
He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill:
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious?
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept:
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause:
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgement! thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason…. Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me”

And

“There is a tide in the affairs of men
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat;
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.”

And

“But I am constant as the Northern Star,
Of whose true fixed and resting quality
There is no fellow in the firmament.”

And

“Death, a necessary end, will come when it will come”

And

“I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones”

Wikipedia:  Julius Caesar

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