Monthly Archive: August 2017

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, August 31, 2017 – Woody Hayes

 

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“I’ve had smarter people around me all my life, but I haven’t run into one yet that can outwork me. And if they can’t outwork you, then smarts aren’t going to do them much good. That’s just the way it is. And if you believe that and live by it, you’d be surprised at how much fun you can have.”

And

“Without winners, there wouldn’t even be any civilization.”

And

“There’s nothing that cleanses your soul like getting the hell kicked out of you.”

And

“The height of human desire is what wins, whether it’s on Normandy Beach or in Ohio Stadium.”

And

“I’m not coming here looking for security. I came here for the opportunity.” Upon accepting Ohio State head coaching job

And

“Paralyze resistance with persistence.”

And

“I don’t live in the past. I’m a student of the past, and I try to learn from the past, although some people will say, ‘You haven’t done a very good job of it.’ But for me to live in the past? Hell, no.'”

And

“A man is always better than he thinks.”

And

“I can accept failure, but I can’t accept not trying.”

And

“The time you give a man something he doesn’t earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect.”

And

“Success – it ‘s what you do with what you’ve got.”

And

“Coaches who can outline plays on a black board are a dime a dozen. The ones who win get inside their players heads and motivate them.”

And

“I’m not trying to win a popularity poll. I’m trying to win football games. I don’t like nice people. I like tough, honest people.”

And

“I don’t apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there. I just despise to lose, and that has taken a man of mediocre ability and made a pretty good coach out of him.”

And

“Just remember one thing. I can do your job, but you can’t do mine.” – to an OSU professor

And

“I love football. I think it is most wonderful game in world and I despise to lose.”

Wikipedia:  Woody Hayes

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, August 30, 2017 – Amos Alonzo Stagg

 

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“I pray not for victory, but to do my best.”

And

“To me, the coaching profession is one of the noblest and most far-reaching in building manhood. No man is too good to be the athletic coach for youth”

And

“All football comes from Stagg.” Knute Rockne

And

“Winning isn’t worthwhile unless one has something finer and nobler behind it.”

Wikipedia: Amos Alonzo Stagg

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, August 29, 2017 – James Dean

 

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“Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.”

And

“There is no way to be truly great in this world. We are all impaled on the crook of conditioning.”

And

“Being an actor is the loneliest thing in the world. You are all alone with your concentration and imagination, and that’s all you have.”

And

“Only the gentle are ever really strong.”

And

“Being a good actor isn’t easy. Being a man is even harder. I want to be both before I’m done.”

And

“When an actor plays a scene exactly the way a director orders, it isn’t acting. It’s following instructions. Anyone with the physical qualifications can do that.”

And

“If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live on after he’s dead, then maybe he was a great man.”

And

“To grasp the full significance of life is the actor’s duty; to interpret it is his problem; and to express it is his dedication.”

And

“The gratification comes in the doing, not in the results.”

And

“The only greatness for man is immortality.”

And

“I also became close to nature, and am now able to appreciate the beauty with which this world is endowed.”

Wikipedia: James Dean

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, August 28, 2017 – Bart Starr

 

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“Athletic competition clearly defines the unique power of our attitude.”

And

“Desire and dedication are everything!”

And

“My dad never pushed me but the big thing is that he helped me by going out in the backyard and playing with me.”

And

“If you work harder than somebody else, chances are you’ll beat him though he has more talent than you.”

And

“Coach Lombardi showed me that by working hard and using my mind, I could overcome my weakness to the point where I could be one of the best.”

And

“It takes me about a week and a half to really analyze a game – play by play.”

Wikipedia:  Bart Starr

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, August 27, 2017 – Jake Gaither


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“I like my boys agile, mobile and hostile.”

And

”Football is a hard-nosed game. You go into it pulling no punches and asking none. Football is a character-building game—but you can build more character with a winning team than with a losing one.”

And

“Expect to lose sometimes, but a loss can be a stepping stone to victory if used properly.”

And

“The Bear can take his and beat yours and take yours and beat his.” Jake Gaither, former Florida A&M coach on Alabama’s legendary Bear Bryant

And

“Never leave the field with a boy feeling you’re mad at him. You can chew him out, but then pat him on the shoulder.”

And

“It’s bad coaching to blame your boys for losing a game, even if it’s true.”

And

“I just organize. Give me credit for selecting good assistants.”

And

“Excuses are no good. Your friends don’t need them, and your enemies won’t believe them.”

Wikipedia: Jake Gaither

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, August 26, 2017 – Bill Walsh

 

Bill Walsh’s Five Don’ts

“1. Don’t ask, “Why me?”

2. Don’t expect sympathy.

3. Don’t bellyache.

4. Don’t keep accepting condolences.

5. Don’t blame others.”

And

“If you see players who hate practice, their coach isn’t doing a very good job.”

And

“The absolute bottom line in coaching is organization and preparing for practice.”

And

“A resolute and resourceful leader understands that there are a multitude of means to increase the probability of success. And that’s what it all comes down to, namely, intelligently and relentlessly seeking solutions that will increase your chance of prevailing in a competitive environment. When you do that, the score will take care of itself.”

And

“I’ve observed that if individuals who prevail in a highly competitive environment have any one thing in common besides success, it is failure—and their ability to overcome it.”

And

“The ability to help the people around me self-actualize their goals underlines the single aspect of my abilities and the label that I value most—teacher.”

And

“Failure is part of success, an integral part. Everybody gets knocked down. Knowing it will happen and what you must do when it does is the first step back.”

And

“When you stand and overcome a significant setback, you’ll find an increasing inner confidence and self-assurance that has been created by conquering defeat. Absorbing and overcoming this kind of punishment engenders a sober, steely toughness that results in a hardened sense of independence and a personal belief that you can take on anything, survive and win.”

And

“Great players and great companies don’t suddenly start hunching up, grimacing, and trying to “hit the ball harder” at a critical point. Rather, they’re in a mode, a zone in which they’re performing and depending on their “game,” which they’ve mastered over many months and years of intelligently directed hard work. There’s only so much thinking you can isolate and focus on during that kind of extreme competitive pressure. It has to be tactical more than a conscious effort to really “try harder.” You just want to function very well, up to your potential, effortlessly—do what you already know how to do at the level of excellence you’ve acquired—whether in making a presentation or coaching a game or anything else.”

And

“Everybody’s got an opinion. Leaders are paid to make a decision. The difference between offering an opinion and making a decision is the difference between working for the leader and being the leader.”

And

“We all have in our mind inspiring examples of individuals who persevered beyond the point of reason and common sense and prevailed. We tend to ignore the more numerous examples of individuals who persisted and persisted and finally failed and took everybody down with them because they would not change course or quit. We ignore them because we never heard about them.”

And

“You must be the best version of yourself that you can be; stay within the framework of your own personality and be authentic. If you’re faking it, you’ll be found out.”

And

“The trademark of a well-led organization in sports or business is that it’s virtually self-sustaining and self-directed—almost autonomous. To put it in a more personal way, if your staff doesn’t seem fully mobilized and energized until you enter the room, if they require your presence to carry on at the level of effort and excellence you have tried to install, your leadership has not percolated down.”

And

“Strong leaders don’t plead with individuals to perform.”

And

“Make each person in your employ very aware that his or her well-being has a high priority with the organization and that the well-being of the organization must be his or her highest professional priority.”

And

“The highest-paid, most talented people that you can go out and hire will not perform to their potential unless they feel as if they are part of something special—a family that treats them right.”

And

“It was always my goal to create and maintain a working environment both on and off the field that had a sense of urgency and intensity but did not feel like we were in constant crisis mode.”

And

“In evaluating people, I prize ego. It often translates into a fierce desire to do their best and an inner confidence that stands them in good stead when things really get rough. Psychologists suggest that there is a strong link between ego and competitiveness. All the great performers I’ve ever coached had ego to spare.”

And

“Extra effort,” in whatever form it takes (mental, physical, emotional), cannot be sustained without eventual damage and diminishing returns. There has to be a very acute awareness on your part as to the level of exertion and the toll it’s taking on those you lead.”

And

“By instinct we—leaders—want to run hard all the time; by intellect we know this is not possible. Reconciling those two positions in the context of leadership is an ongoing challenge.”

And

“Concentrate on what will produce results rather than on the results, the process rather than the prize.”

And

“Clear thinking and overly charged emotions are usually antithetical.”

And

“People matter most—more than equipment, investors, inventions, momentum, or X’s and O’s. People are at the heart of achieving organizational greatness.”

And

“Afford each person the same respect, support, and fair treatment you would expect if your roles were reversed. Deal with people individually, not as objects who are part of a herd—that’s the critical factor.”

And

“If you care about how you’re perceived by others, including the public, it’s good to remember the following: Criticism—both deserved and undeserved—is part of the territory when you’re the one calling the shots. Ignore the undeserved; learn from the deserved; lick your wounds and move on.”

And

“Calculated risks are part of what you do, but the idea that something completely crazy will work just because it’s completely crazy is completely crazy.”

And

“One of the common traits of outstanding performers—coaches, athletes, managers, sales representatives, executives, and others who face a daily up/down, win/lose accounting system—is that a rejection, that is, defeat, is quickly forgotten, replaced eagerly by pursuit of a new order, client, or opponent.”

And

“Nothing is more effective than sincere, accurate praise, and nothing is more lame than a cookie-cutter compliment.” 

And

“If you are worthy of emulation, you have left an unbelievable legacy. He was a great coach, a great friend, and I’m going to miss him terribly.” Former coach Dick Vermeil at Coach Bill Walsh Memorial Service

And

“I came to the San Francisco 49ers with a specific goal – to implement what I call the Standard of Performance. It was a way of doing things, a leadership philosophy, that has as much to do with core values, principles, and ideals as with blocking, tackling, and passing; more to do with the mental than with the physical.”

And

“The culture precedes positive results. It doesn’t get tacked on as an afterthought on your way to the victory stand. Champions behave like champions before they’re champions: they have a winning standard of performance before they are winners.”

And

“For me, the road had been rocky at times, triumphant too, but along the way I had never wavered in my dedication to installing – teaching – those actions and attitudes I believed would create a great team, a superior organization. I knew that if I achieved that, the score would take care of itself.”

And

“For me the starting point for everything – before strategy, tactics, theories, managing, organizing, philosophy, methodology, talent, or experience – is work ethic. Without one of significant magnitude you’re dead in the water, finished. I knew the example I set as head coach would be what others in the organization would recognize as the standard they needed to match (at least, most of them would recognize it). If there is such a thing as a trickle-down effect, that’s it. Your staff sees your devotion to work, their people see them, and on through the organization.”

And

“In building and maintaining your organization, place a premium on those who exhibit great desire to keep pushing themselves to higher and higher performance and production levels, who seek to go beyond the highest standards that you, the leader, set. The employee who gets to work early, stays late, fights through illness and personal problems is the one to keep your eye on for greater responsibilities.”

And

“All successful leaders know where we want to go, figure out a way we believe will get the organization there, and then move forward with absolute determination. We may falter from time to time, but ultimately we are unswerving in moving toward our goal; we will not quit. There is an inner compulsion – obsession – to get it done the way you want it done.”

And

“Victory is produced by and belongs to all. Winning a Super Bowl results from you whole team not only doing their individual jobs but perceiving that those jobs contributed to overall success. The trophy doesn’t belong just to a superstar quarterback or CEO, head coach or top salesperson. This is an essential lesson I taught the San Francisco organization: The offensive team is not a country unto itself, nor is the defensive team or the special teams, staff, coaches, or anyone in the organization separate from the fate of the organization. WE are united and fight as one; we win or lose as one.”

Four Leadership Tips From Bill Walsh from…

The Score Takes Care of Itself:  My Philosophy of Leadership, Amazon.com

1. Making The Best Of What You Have

“What assets do we have right now that we’re not taking advantage of?”

E.g: Walsh took inventory of his Bengals’ struggling offense which was undersized (meaning running the ball was a big challenge) and not capable of passing for long yardage (quarterback Virgil Carter could not throw very far) (though he could throw decently for short yardage).

Walsh then took stock of what he had to work with in terms of field real estate and had an uh-huh realization that they had 53.5 yards of width on the field (about half the distance of the length of the field) and the availability of 5 potential receivers.

Thus the West Coast Offense was born: the idea of throwing more often, to more receivers, for short yardage.

2. Good Leaders Give a Healthy Mix of Positive Criticism (not just negative/constructive criticism).

“If you’re growing a garden, you need to pull out the weeds, but flowers will die if all you do is pick weeds. They need sunshine and water. People are the same.

They need criticism, but they also require positive substantive language and information and true support to truly blossom.”

3. Good Leaders Look For These Five Qualities In Their Hires

1. A fundamental knowledge of the area they’ve been hired to manage
2. A relatively high — but not manic — level of energy and enthusiasm and a personality that is upbeat, motivated and animated.
3. The ability to discern talent in potential employees.
4. An ability to communicate in a relaxed yet authoritative — but not authoritarian — manner.
5. Unconditional loyalty to both you and other staff members.

4. The Four Most Powerful Words In Leadership

“I believe in you” (or equivalent words of your own).

Walsh writes that even Joe Montana (who already had a bunch of confidence) benefited from his coach telling him he believed in him.

Providing confidence to your team is perhaps the most powerful lever you can pull to help them optimize their performance.

And Walsh adds: And nobody will ever come back to you later and say “thank you” for expecting too little of them.

Wikipedia:   Bill Walsh

The book of coach, Seth Wickersham, ESPN.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, August 25, 2017 – George Halas

 

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“Nobody who ever gave his best regretted it.”

And

“Nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else.”

And

“Find out what the other team wants to do. Then take it away from them.”

And

“If you live long enough, lots of nice things happen.”

And

“Don’t do anything in practice that you wouldn’t do in the game.”

And

“You can achieve only that which you will do.”

And

“Many people flounder about in life because they do not have a purpose, an objective toward which to work.”

And

“San Francisco has always been my favorite booing city. I don’t mean the people boo louder or longer, but there is a very special intimacy. When they boo you, you know they mean you. Music, that’s what it is to me. One time in Kezar Stadium they gave me a standing boo.”

Wikipedia Page: George Halas

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, August 24, 2017 – Sun Tzu

 

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“If your enemy is secure at all points, be prepared for him. If he is in superior strength, evade him. If your opponent is temperamental, seek to irritate him. Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant. If he is taking his ease, give him no rest. If his forces are united, separate them. If sovereign and subject are in accord, put division between them. Attack him where he is unprepared, appear where you are not expected.”

And

“Be extremely subtle, even to the point of formlessness. Be extremely mysterious, even to the point of soundlessness. Thereby you can be the director of the opponent’s fate.”

And

“If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles.”

And

“All men can see these tactics whereby I conquer, but what none can see is the strategy out of which victory is evolved.”

And

“All war is deception.”

And

“Know thy self, know thy enemy. A thousand battles, a thousand victories.”

And

“Opportunities multiply as they are seized.”

And

“Invincibility lies in the defence; the possibility of victory in the attack.”

And

“For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the acme of skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the acme of skill.”

And

“The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.”

And

“The opportunity to secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.”

And

“Know your enemy and know yourself and you can fight a hundred battles without disaster.”

And

“The general who wins the battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. The general who loses makes but few calculations beforehand.”

And

“He who knows when he can fight and when he cannot, will be victorious.”

And

“Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting.”

And

“You have to believe in yourself.”

And

“Confront them with annihilation, and they will then survive; plunge them into a deadly situation, and they will then live. When people fall into danger, they are then able to strive for victory.”

And

“He who is prudent and lies in wait for an enemy who is not, will be victorious.”

And

“If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.”

And

“Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.”

And

“It is essential to seek out enemy agents who have come to conduct espionage against you and to bribe them to serve you. Give them instructions and care for them. Thus doubled agents are recruited and used.”

And

“Hence that general is skilful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skilful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.”

And

“Now the reason the enlightened prince and the wise general conquer the enemy whenever they move and their achievements surpass those of ordinary men is foreknowledge.”

And

“If you are far from the enemy, make him believe you are near.”

And

“It is only the enlightened ruler and the wise general who will use the highest intelligence of the army for the purposes of spying, and thereby they achieve great results.”

And

“Thus it is that in war the victorious strategist only seeks battle after the victory has been won, whereas he who is destined to defeat first fights and afterwards looks for victory.”

And

“Pretend inferiority and encourage his arrogance.”

And

“Thus, what is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy’s strategy.”

And

“In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy’s country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good.”

And

“Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.”

And

“There is no instance of a nation benefitting from prolonged warfare.”

And

“Of all those in the army close to the commander none is more intimate than the secret agent; of all rewards none more liberal than those given to secret agents; of all matters none is more confidential than those relating to secret operations.”

And

“The general who advances without coveting fame and retreats without fearing disgrace, whose only thought is to protect his country and do good service for his sovereign, is the jewel of the kingdom.”

And

“The skilful employer of men will employ the wise man, the brave man, the covetous man, and the stupid man.”

And

“The good fighters of old first put themselves beyond the possibility of defeat, and then waited for an opportunity of defeating the enemy.”

And

“To fight and conquer in all our battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting.”

And

“The quality of decision is like the well-timed swoop of a falcon which enables it to strike and destroy its victim.”

And

“If our soldiers are not overburdened with money, it is not because they have a distaste for riches; if their lives are not unduly long, it is not because they are disinclined to longevity.”

And

“There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited.”

And

“For them to perceive the advantage of defeating the enemy, they must also have their rewards.”

And

“Hence the saying: If you know the enemy and you know yourself, your victory will not stand in doubt; if you now Heaven and you know Earth, you may make your victory complete.”

And

“If fighting is sure to result in victory, than you must fight, even though the ruler forbid it; if fighting will not result in victory, then you must not fight even at the ruler’s bidding.”

And

“Prohibit the taking of omens, and do away with superstitious doubts. Then, until death itself comes, no calamity need be feared.”

And

“Secret operations are essential in war; upon them the army relies to make its every move.”

And

“When envoys are sent with compliments in their mouths, it is a sign that the enemy wishes for a truce.”

And

“If we know that our own men are in a condition to attack, but are unaware that the enemy is not open to attack, we have gone only halfway towards victory.”

And

“The enlightened ruler is heedful, and the good general full of caution.”

Wikipedia Page: Sun Tzu

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, August 23, 2017 – Carl Von Clausewitz

 

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“All action takes place, so to speak, in a kind of twilight, which like a fog or moonlight, often tends to make things seem grotesque and larger than they really are.”

And

“Courage, above all things, is the first quality of a warrior.”

And

“Everything in war is very simple. But the simplest thing is difficult.”

And

“If the leader is filled with high ambition and if he pursues his aims with audacity and strength of will, he will reach them in spite of all obstacles.”

And

“It is even better to act quickly and err than to hesitate until the time of action is past.”

And

“Never forget that no military leader has ever become great without audacity.”

And

“Principles and rules are intended to provide a thinking man with a frame of reference.”

And

“The backbone of surprise is fusing speed with secrecy.”

And

“The more a general is accustomed to place heavy demands on his soldiers, the more he can depend on their response.”

And

“The political object is the goal, war is the means of reaching it, and the means can never be considered in isolation form their purposes.”

And

“Two qualities are indispensable: first, an intellect that, even in the darkest hour, retains some glimmerings of the inner light which leads to truth; and second, the courage to follow this faint light wherever it may lead.”

And

“War therefore is an act of violence to compel our opponent to fulfill our will.”

And

“Kind-hearted people might of course think there was some ingenious way to disarm or defeat the enemy without too much bloodshed, and might imagine this is the true goal of the art of war. Pleasant as it sounds, it is a fallacy that must be exposed: War is such a dangerous business that mistakes that come from kindness are the very worst.”

And

“Determination in a single instance is an expression of courage; if it becomes characteristic, a mental habit. But here we are referring not to physical courage but to courage to accept responsibility, courage in the face of a moral danger. This has often been called courage d’esprit, because it is created by the intellect. That, however, does not make it an act of the intellect: it is an act of temperament. Intelligence alone is not courage; we often see that the most intelligent people are irresolute. Since in the rush of events a man is governed by feelings rather than by thought, the intellect needs to arouse the quality of courage, which then supports and sustains it in action.
Looked at in this way, the role of determination is to limit the agonies of doubt and the perils of hesitation when the motives for action are inadequate.”

And

“We repeat again: strength of character does not consist solely in having powerful feelings, but in maintaining one’s balance in spite of them. Even with the violence of emotion, judgment and principle must still function like a ship’s compass, which records the slightest variations however rough the sea.”

And

“Men are always more inclined to pitch their estimate of the enemy’s strength too high than too low, such is human nature.”

And

“With uncertainty in one scale, courage and self-confidence should be thrown into the other to correct the balance. The greater they are, the greater the margin that can be left for accidents.”

And

“Although our intellect always longs for clarity and certainty, our nature often finds uncertainty fascinating.”

And

“Any complex activity, if it is to be carried on with any degree of virtuosity, calls for appropriate gifts of intellect and temperament. If they are outstanding and reveal themselves in exceptional achievements, their possessor is called a ‘genius’.”

And

“If the mind is to emerge unscathed from this relentless struggle with the unforeseen, two qualities are indispensable: first, an intellect that, even in the darkest hour, retains some glimmerings of the inner light which leads to truth; and second, the courage to follow this faint light wherever it may lead.”

And

“There are times when the utmost daring is the height of wisdom.”

And

“Boldness governed by superior intellect is the mark of a hero.”

Wikipedia Page: Carl Von Clausewitz

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, August 22, 2017 – Johnny Carson

 

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“Anytime four New Yorkers get into a cab together without arguing, a bank robbery has just taken place.”

And

“Happiness is your dentist telling you it won’t hurt and then having him catch his hand in the drill.”

And

“I know a man who gave up smoking, drinking, sex, and rich food. He was healthy right up to the day he killed himself.”

And

“I know you’ve been married to the same woman for 69 years. That is marvelous. It must be very inexpensive.”

And

“I was so naive as a kid I used to sneak behind the barn and do nothing.”

And

“My success just evolved from working hard at the business at hand each day.”

And

“Never continue in a job you don’t enjoy. If you’re happy in what you’re doing, you’ll like yourself, you’ll have inner peace. And if you have that, along with physical health, you will have had more success than you could possibly have imagined.”

And

“Talent alone won’t make you a success. Neither will being in the right place at the right time, unless you are ready. The most important question is: “Are your ready?””

And

“The only thing money gives you is the freedom of not worrying about money”

Wikipedia: Johnny Carson

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