Daily Archive: November 16, 2017

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, November 17, 2017 – James Madison

 

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“The circulation of confidence is better than the circulation of money.”

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“The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.”

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“Liberty may be endangered by the abuse of liberty, but also by the abuse of power.”

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“If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.”

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“The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse.”

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“Philosophy is common sense with big words.”

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“America was indebted to immigration for her settlement and prosperity. That part of America which had encouraged them most had advanced most rapidly in population, agriculture and the arts.”

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“A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained in arms, is the best most natural defense of a free country.”

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“A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both.”

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“Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

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“The purpose of separation of church and state is to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe with blood for centuries.”

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“If men were angels, no government would be necessary.”

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“What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”

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“The truth is that all men having power ought to be mistrusted.”

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“In Republics, the great danger is, that the majority may not sufficiently respect the rights of the minority.”

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“Let me recommend the best medicine in the world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant country, in easy stages.”

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“The people are the only legitimate fountain of power, and it is from them that the constitutional charter, under which the several branches of government hold their power, is derived.”

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“The happy Union of these States is a wonder; their Constitution a miracle; their example the hope of Liberty throughout the world.”

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“No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”

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“Wherever there is interest and power to do wrong, wrong will generally be done.”

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“War should only be declared by the authority of the people, whose toils and treasures are to support its burdens, instead of the government which is to reap its fruits.”

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“To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea.”

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“What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual and surest support?”

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“There is no maxim, in my opinion, which is more liable to be misapplied, and which, therefore, more needs elucidation, than the current one, that the interest of the majority is the political standard of right and wrong.”

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“Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.”

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“The personal right to acquire property, which is a natural right, gives to property, when acquired, a right to protection, as a social right.”

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“The man who is possessed of wealth, who lolls on his sofa or rolls in his carriage, cannot judge the wants or feelings of the day-laborer. The government we mean to erect is intended to last for ages. The landed interest, at present, is prevalent; but in process of time, when we approximate to the states and kingdoms of Europe, — when the number of landholders shall be comparatively small, through the various means of trade and manufactures, will not the landed interest be overbalanced in future elections, and unless wisely provided against, what will become of your government? In England, at this day, if elections were open to all classes of people, the property of landed proprietors would be insecure. An agrarian law would soon take place. If these observations be just, our government ought to secure the permanent interests of the country against innovation. Landholders ought to have a share in the government, to support these invaluable interests, and to balance and check the other. They ought to be so constituted as to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority. The senate, therefore, ought to be this body; and to answer these purposes, they ought to have permanency and stability.”

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“In time of actual war, great discretionary powers are constantly given to the Executive Magistrate. Constant apprehension of War, has the same tendency to render the head too large for the body. A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty. The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people.”

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“Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression. In our Governments, the real power lies in the majority of the Community, and the invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from the acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the constituents.”

Wikipedia Page:  James Madison

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, November 16, 2017 – Thomas Paine

 

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A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.

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“Character is much easier kept than recovered.”

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“Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.”

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“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”

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“I prefer peace. But if trouble must come, let it come in my time, so that my children can live in peace.”

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“One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.”

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“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best stage, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.”

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“That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly.”

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“There are two distinct classes of what are called thoughts: those that we produce in ourselves by reflection and the act of thinking and those that bolt into the mind of their own accord.”

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“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

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“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.”

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“We have it in our power to begin the world over again.”

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“We have every opportunity and every encouragement before us, to form the noblest purest constitution on the face of the earth. We have it in our power to begin the world over again. A situation, similar to the present, hath not happened since the days of Noah until now. The birthday of a new world is at hand, and a race of men, perhaps as numerous as all Europe contains, are to receive their portion of freedom from the event of a few months.” Common Sense, 1776

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“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.” The American Crisis, 1776

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“It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” The American Crisis, 1776

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“The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of man change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it.” The Rights of Man, 1791

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“It is the nature and intention of a constitution to prevent governing by party, by establishing a common principle that shall limit and control the power and impulse of party, and that says to all parties, thus far shalt thou go and no further. But in the absence of a constitution, men look entirely to party; and instead of principle governing party, party governs principle.” First Principles of Government, 1795

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“I never tire of reading Tom Paine.” Abraham Lincoln, as quoted in A Literary History of the American People, 1931

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“I consider Paine our greatest political thinker. As we have not advanced, and perhaps never shall advance, beyond the Declaration and Constitution, so Paine has had no successors who extended his principles.” Thomas Alva Edison

Wikipedia: Thomas Paine

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