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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, March 31, 2018 – Aristotle

 

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“All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.”

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“All men by nature desire knowledge.”

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“Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.”

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“Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.”

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“No great genius has ever existed without some touch of madness.”

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“The energy of the mind is the essence of life.”

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“You will never do anything in this world without courage. It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.”

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“He who has overcome his fears will truly be free.”

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“Well begun is half done.”

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“Man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all.”

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‘Any one can get angry — that is easy — or give or spend money; but to do this to the right person, to the right extent, at the right time, with the right motive, and in the right way, that is not for every one, nor is it easy.”

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“Man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all.”

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“Again, men in general desire the good, and not merely what their fathers had.”

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“A state is not a mere society, having a common place, established for the prevention of mutual crime and for the sake of exchange…. Political society exists for the sake of noble actions, and not of mere companionship.”

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“The basis of a democratic state is liberty.”

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“With regard to excellence, it is not enough to know, but we must try to have and use it.”

Wikipedia: Aristotle

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, March 30, 2018 – Marcus Aurelius

 

“A man should be upright, not be kept upright.”

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“A man’s worth is no greater than his ambitions.”

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“Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart.”

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“Be content with what you are, and wish not change; nor dread your last day, nor long for it.”

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“Because your own strength is unequal to the task, do not assume that it is beyond the powers of man; but if anything is within the powers and province of man, believe that it is within your own compass also.”

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“Dig within. Within is the wellspring of Good; and it is always ready to bubble up, if you just dig.”

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“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”

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“If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”

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“It is not death that a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.”

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“Let men see, let them know, a real man, who lives as he was meant to live.”

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“Life is neither good or evil, but only a place for good and evil.”

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“Look back over the past, with its changing empires that rose and fell, and you can foresee the future, too.”

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“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

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“Nothing has such power to broaden the mind as the ability to investigate systematically and truly all that comes under thy observation in life.”

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“Observe constantly that all things take place by change, and accustom thyself to consider that the nature of the Universe loves nothing so much as to change the things which are, and to make new things like them.”

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“The secret of all victory lies in the organization of the non-obvious.”

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“Tomorrow is nothing, today is too late; the good lived yesterday.”

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“Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.”

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“When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive – to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love.”

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“Remember that man lives only in the present, in this fleeting instant; all the rest of his life is either past and gone, or not yet revealed.”

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“At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: “I am called to man’s labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?”

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“Everything–a horse, a vine–is created for some duty…For what task, then, were you yourself created? A man’s true delight is to do the things he was made for.”

Wikipedia: Marcus Aurelius

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, March 29, 2018 – Milton Friedman

 

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“A major source of objection to a free economy is precisely that group thinks they ought to want. Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself.”

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“And what does reward virtue? You think the communist commissar rewards virtue? You think a Hitler rewards virtue? You think, excuse me, if you’ll pardon me, American presidents reward virtue? Do they choose their appointees on the basis of the virtue of the people appointed or on the basis of their political clout?”

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“Columbus did not seek a new route to the Indies in response to a majority directive.”

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“Concentrated power is not rendered harmless by the good intentions of those who create it.”

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“Every friend of freedom must be as revolted as I am by the prospect of turning the United States into an armed camp, by the vision of jails filled with casual drug users and of an army of enforcers empowered to invade the liberty of citizens on slight evidence.”

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“Governments never learn. Only people learn.”

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“Hell hath no fury like a bureaucrat scorned.”

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“History suggests that capitalism is a necessary condition for political freedom. Clearly it is not a sufficient condition.”

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“I am favor of cutting taxes under any circumstances and for any excuse, for any reason, whenever it’s possible.”

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“If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there’d be a shortage of sand.”

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“Inflation is taxation without legislation.”

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“Inflation is the one form of taxation that can be imposed without legislation.”

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“Many people want the government to protect the consumer. A much more urgent problem is to protect the consumer from the government.”

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“Most economic fallacies derive from the tendency to assume that there is a fixed pie, that one party can gain only at the expense of another.”

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“Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program.”

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“One man’s opportunism is another man’s statesmanship.”

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“Only government can take perfectly good paper, cover it with perfectly good ink and make the combination worthless.”

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“So that the record of history is absolutely crystal clear. That there is no alternative way, so far discovered, of improving the lot of the ordinary people that can hold a candle to the productive activities that are unleashed by a free enterprise system.”

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“The government solution to a problem is usually as bad as the problem.”

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“The Great Depression, like most other periods of severe unemployment, was produced by government mismanagement rather than by any inherent instability of the private economy.”

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“The greatest advances of civilization, whether in architecture or painting, in science and literature, in industry or agriculture, have never come from centralized government.”

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“The only way that has ever been discovered to have a lot of people cooperate together voluntarily is through the free market. And that’s why it’s so essential to preserving individual freedom.”

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“The power to do good is also the power to do harm.”

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“The world runs on individuals pursuing their self interests. The great achievements of civilization have not come from government bureaus. Einstein didn’t construct his theory under order from a, from a bureaucrat. Henry Ford didn’t revolutionize the automobile industry that way.”

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“There’s no such thing as a free lunch.”

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“Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself.”

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“We have a system that increasingly taxes work and subsidizes nonwork.”

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“Well first of all, tell me, is there some society you know of that doesn’t run on greed? You think Russia doesn’t run on greed? You think China doesn’t run on greed? What is greed?”

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“When everybody owns something, nobody owns it, and nobody has a direct interest in maintaining or improving its condition. That is why buildings in the Soviet Union — like public housing in the United States — look decrepit within a year or two of their construction…”

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“When the United States was formed in 1776, it took 19 people on the farm to produce enough food for 20 people. So most of the people had to spend their time and efforts on growing food. Today, it’s down to 1% or 2% to produce that food. Now just consider the vast amount of supposed unemployment that was produced by that. But there wasn’t really any unemployment produced. What happened was that people who had formerly been tied up working in agriculture were freed by technological developments and improvements to do something else. That enabled us to have a better standard of living and a more extensive range of products.”

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“Nobody spends somebody else’s money as carefully as he spends his own. Nobody uses somebody else’s resources as carefully as he uses his own. So if you want efficiency and effectiveness, if you want knowledge to be properly utilized, you have to do it through the means of private property.”

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“Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon in the sense that it is and can be produced only by a more rapid increase in the quantity of money than in output. … A steady rate of monetary growth at a moderate level can provide a framework under which a country can have little inflation and much growth. It will not produce perfect stability; it will not produce heaven on earth; but it can make an important contribution to a stable economic society.”

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“One of the great mistakes is to judge policies and programs by their intentions rather than their results.”

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“Society doesn’t have values. People have values.”

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“A society that puts equality before freedom will get neither. A society that puts freedom before equality will get a high degree of both.”

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“The stock of money, prices and output was decidedly more unstable after the establishment of the Reserve System than before. The most dramatic period of instability in output was, of course, the period between the two wars, which includes the severe (monetary) contractions of 1920-1, 1929-33, and 1937-8. No other 20 year period in American history contains as many as three such severe contractions.

This evidence persuades me that at least a third of the price rise during and just after World War I is attributable to the establishment of the Federal Reserve System… and that the severity of each of the major contractions — 1920-1, 1929-33 and 1937-8 is directly attributable to acts of commission and omission by the Reserve authorities…

Any system which gives so much power and so much discretion to a few men, [so] that mistakes — excusable or not — can have such far reaching effects, is a bad system. It is a bad system to believers in freedom just because it gives a few men such power without any effective check by the body politic — this is the key political argument against an independent central bank.

To paraphrase Clemenceau, money is much too serious a matter to be left to the central bankers.”

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The Federal Reserve definitely caused the Great Depression by contracting the amount of money in circulation by one-third from 1929 to 1933

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“There are four ways in which you can spend money. You can spend your own money on yourself. When you do that, why then you really watch out what you’re doing, and you try to get the most for your money. Then you can spend your own money on somebody else. For example, I buy a birthday present for someone. Well, then I’m not so careful about the content of the present, but I’m very careful about the cost. Then, I can spend somebody else’s money on myself. And if I spend somebody else’s money on myself, then I’m sure going to have a good lunch! Finally, I can spend somebody else’s money on somebody else. And if I spend somebody else’s money on somebody else, I’m not concerned about how much it is, and I’m not concerned about what I get. And that’s government. And that’s close to 40% of our national income.”

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“The free man will ask neither what his country can do for him nor what he can do for his country. He will ask rather “What can I and my compatriots do through government” to help us discharge our individual responsibilities, to achieve our several goals and purposes, and above all, to protect our freedom? And he will accompany this question with another: How can we keep the government we create from becoming a Frankenstein that will destroy the very freedom we establish it to protect? Freedom is a rare and delicate plant. Our minds tell us, and history confirms, that the great threat to freedom is the concentration of power. Government is necessary to preserve our freedom, it is an instrument through which we can exercise our freedom; yet by concentrating power in political hands, it is also a threat to freedom. Even though the men who wield this power initially be of good will and even though they be not corrupted by the power they exercise, the power will both attract and form men of a different stamp.”

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“Because we live in a largely free society, we tend to forget how limited is the span of time and the part of the globe for which there has ever been anything like political freedom: the typical state of mankind is tyranny, servitude, and misery. The nineteenth century and early twentieth century in the Western world stand out as striking exceptions to the general trend of historical development. Political freedom in this instance clearly came along with the free market and the development of capitalist institutions. So also did political freedom in the golden age of Greece and in the early days of the Roman era.

History suggests only that capitalism is a necessary condition for political freedom. Clearly it is not a sufficient condition.”

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“Political freedom means the absence of coercion of a man by his fellow men. The fundamental threat to freedom is power to coerce, be it in the hands of a monarch, a dictator, an oligarchy, or a momentary majority. The preservation of freedom requires the elimination of such concentration of power to the fullest possible extent and the dispersal and distribution of whatever power cannot be eliminated — a system of checks and balances.”

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“The key insight of Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations is misleadingly simple: if an exchange between two parties is voluntary, it will not take place unless both believe they will benefit from it. Most economic fallacies derive from the neglect of this simple insight, from the tendency to assume that there is a fixed pie, that one party can gain only at the expense of another.”

Wikipedia:  Milton Friedman

In Praise of Milton Friedman, John Blundell, Daily Telegraph

The Man Who Saved Capitalism, Stephen Moore, Wall Street Journal

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, March 28, 2018 – Ernie Banks

 

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“It’s a beautiful day for a ball game…. Let’s play two!” 

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“But it all comes down to friendship, treating people right.”

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“I learned from Mr. Wrigley, early in my career, that loyalty wins and it creates friendships. I saw it work for him in his business.”

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“It’s a kind of philosophy of my own life, to create the energy enough to keep on going.”

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“Loyalty and friendship, which is to me the same, created all the wealth that I’ve ever thought I’d have.”

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“Mr. Wrigley believed in this: Put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket. They don’t do that today. This is the old-fashioned way I’m talking about. He carried it on to his business. Do one thing and stay with it.”

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“The riches of the game are in the thrills, not the money.”

Wikipedia Page:  Ernie Banks

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, March 27, 2018 – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

“Character is higher than intellect.”

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“I cannot find language of sufficient energy to convey my sense of the sacredness of private integrity.”

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“A little integrity is better than any career. “

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“Every industrious man, in every lawful calling, is a useful man. And one principal reason why men are so often useless is that they neglect their own profession or calling, and divide and shift their attention among a multiplicity of objects and pursuits.”

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“What you do thunders so loudly in my ears I cannot hear what you say.”

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“To finish the moment, to find the journey’s end in every step of the road, to live the greatest number of good hours, is wisdom.”

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“We are always getting ready to live but never living.”

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“None of us will ever accomplish anything excellent or commanding except when he listens to this whisper which is heard by him alone.”

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“To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men that is genius. “

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“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

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“Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood.”

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“Whatever you do, you need courage. Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires some of the same courage that a soldier needs. Peace has its victories, but it takes brave men and women to win them.”

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“The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.”

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“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems in a useful life.”

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“A chief event of life is the day in which we have encountered a mind that startled us.”

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“A man is what he thinks about all day long.”

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“As long as a man stands in his own way, everything seems to be in his way.”

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“Character is higher than intellect. A great soul will be strong to live as well as think.”

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“Enthusiasm is the mother of effort, and without it nothing great was ever achieved.”

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“It was high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, ‘always do what you are afraid to do.”

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“Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

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“To be great is to be misunderstood.”

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“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”

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“Trust men and they will be true to you; treat them greatly and they will show themselves great.”

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“With the past, I have nothing to do; nor with the future. I live now.”

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“If the colleges were better, if they … had the power of imparting valuable thought, creative principles, truths which become powers, thoughts which become talents, — if they could cause that a mind not profound should become profound, — we should all rush to their gates: instead of contriving inducements to draw students, you would need to set police at the gates to keep order in the in-rushing multitude.”

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“Only the great generalizations survive. The sharp words of the Declaration of Independence, lampooned then and since as ‘glittering generalities,’ have turned out blazing ubiquities that will burn forever and ever.”

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“To different minds, the same world is a hell, and a heaven.”

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“Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis.”

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“If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore, and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile.”

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“The charming landscape which I saw this morning, is indubitably made up of some twenty or thirty farms. Miller owns this field, Locke that, and Manning the woodland beyond. But none of them owns the landscape. There is a property in the horizon which no man has but he whose eye can integrate all the parts, that is, the poet. This is the best part of these men’s farms, yet to this their warranty-deeds give no title. To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood. His intercourse with heaven and earth, becomes part of his daily food.”

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“But genius looks forward: the eyes of men are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead: man hopes: genius creates.”

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“There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better for worse as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but though his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till.”

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“Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members. Society is a joint-stock company, in which the members agree, for the better securing of his bread to each shareholder, to surrender the liberty and culture of the eater. The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.”

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“Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so.”

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“Whoso would be a man, must be a nonconformist. He who would gather immortal palms must not be hindered by the name of goodness, but must explore if it be goodness. Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind. Absolve you to yourself, and you shall have the suffrage of the world.”

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“Your genuine action will explain itself, and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothing. Act singly, and what you have already done singly will justify you now. Greatness appeals to the future. If I can be firm enough to-day to do right, and scorn eyes, I must have done so much right before as to defend me now. Be it how it will, do right now. Always scorn appearances, and you always may. The force of character is cumulative.”

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“Hence, the less government we have, the better, — the fewer laws, and the less confided power. The antidote to this abuse of formal Government, is, the influence of private character, the growth of the Individual.”

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“Money, which represents the prose of life, and which is hardly spoken of in parlors without an apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.”

And

“The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.”

Wikipedia:  Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, March 26, 2018 – George Washington

 

“The power under the Constitution will always be in the people. It is entrusted for certain defined purposes, and for a certain limited period, to representatives of their own choosing; and whenever it is executed contrary to their interest, or not agreeable to their wishes, their servants can, and undoubtedly will, be recalled.”

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“A slender acquaintance with the world must convince every man that actions, not words, are the true criterion of the attachment of friends.”

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“Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.”

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“Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence.”

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“Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable; procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.”

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“Experience teaches us that it is much easier to prevent an enemy from posting themselves than it is to dislodge them after they have got possession.”

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“Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”

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“Happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected.”

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“I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man.”

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“If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”

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“It may be laid down as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a Free Government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal services to the defense of it.”

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“Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.”

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“Nothing can be more hurtful to the service, than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army the superiority over another.”

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“To be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace.”

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“Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light.”

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“War – An act of violence whose object is to constrain the enemy, to accomplish our will.”

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“Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.”

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“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or die.” George Washington, Address to the Continental Army before the Battle of Long Island, 27 August 1776

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“Nothing is a greater stranger to my breast, or a sin that my soul more abhors, than that black and detestable one, ingratitude.”

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“There is a Destiny which has the control of our actions, not to be resisted by the strongest efforts of Human Nature.”

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“The only stipulations I shall contend for are, that in all things you shall do as you please. I will do the same; and that no ceremony may be used or any restraint be imposed on any one.”

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“Rise early, that by habit it may become familiar, agreeable, healthy, and profitable. It may, for a while, be irksome to do this, but that will wear off; and the practice will produce a rich harvest forever thereafter; whether in public or private walks of life.”

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“The Citizens of the United States of America have a right to applaud themselves for giving to Mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy: a policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.”

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“A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined; to which end a uniform and well-digested plan is requisite; and their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories as tend to render them independent of others for essential, particularly military, supplies.”

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“We have abundant reason to rejoice, that, in this land, the light of truth and reason has triumphed over the power of bigotry and superstition, and that every person may here worship God according to the dictates of his own heart. In this enlightened age, & in this land of equal liberty, it is our boast, that a man’s religious tenets will not forfeit the protection of the laws, nor deprive him of the right of attaining & holding the highest offices that are known in the United States.”

Wikipedia:  George Washington

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, March 25, 2018 – Lucius Annaeus Seneca

 

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“One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood.”

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“Our plans miscarry because they have no aim. When a man does not know what harbour he is making for, no wind is the right wind.”

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“A physician is not angry at the intemperance of a mad patient, nor does he take it ill to be railed at by a man in fever. Just so should a wise man treat all mankind, as a physician does his patient, and look upon them only as sick and extravagant.”

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“Life is the fire that burns and the sun that gives light. Life is the wind and the rain and the thunder in the sky. Life is matter and is earth, what is and what is not, and what beyond is in Eternity.”

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“We are more often frightened than hurt; and we suffer more from imagination than from reality.”

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“It is quality rather than quantity that matters.”

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“It is a rough road that leads to the heights of greatness.”

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“Life’s like a play: it’s not the length, but the excellence of the acting that matters.”

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“Love in its essence is spiritual fire.”

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“Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful.”

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“A happy life is one which is in accordance with its own nature.”

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“A sword never kills anybody; it is a tool in the killer’s hand.”

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“It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult.”

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“True happiness is… to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future.”

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“A gift consists not in what is done or given, but in the intention of the giver or doer.”

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“A gem cannot be polished without friction, nor a man perfected without trials.”

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“Everything is the product of one universal creative effort. There is nothing dead in Nature. Everything is organic and living, and therefore the whole world appears to be a living organism.”

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“The bravest sight in the world is to see a great man struggling against adversity.”

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“Wisdom does not show itself so much in precept as in life – in firmness of mind and a mastery of appetite. It teaches us to do as well as to talk; and to make our words and actions all of a color.”

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“Expecting is the greatest impediment to living. In anticipation of tomorrow, it loses today.”

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“There is no person so severely punished, as those who subject themselves to the whip of their own remorse.”

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“Shall I tell you what the real evil is? To cringe to the things that are called evils, to surrender to them our freedom, in defiance of which we ought to face any suffering.”

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“There is no great genius without some touch of madness.”

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“Nothing is so wretched or foolish as to anticipate misfortunes. What madness is it to be expecting evil before it comes.”

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“Be wary of the man who urges an action in which he himself incurs no risk.”

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“It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor.”

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“Everywhere means nowhere. When a person spends all his time in foreign travel, he ends by having many acquaintances, but no friends.”

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“Live among men as if God beheld you; speak with God as if men were listening.”

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“Men do not care how nobly they live, but only how long, although it is within the reach of every man to live nobly, but within no man’s power to live long.”

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“God is near you, with you, and in you. Thus I say, Lucilius: there sits a holy spirit within us, a watcher of our right and wrong doing, and a guardian…”

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“Treat your inferiors as you would be treated by your betters.”

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“You can tell the character of every man when you see how he gives and receives praise.”

Wikipedia:  Lucius Annaeus Seneca

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, March 24, 2018 – Walt Whitman

 

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“Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.”

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“Re-examine all that you have been told… dismiss that which insults your soul.”

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“I have learned that to be with those I like is enough.”

And

“After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality, and so on – have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently wear – what remains? Nature remains.”

And

“I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars.”

And

“If you done it, it ain’t bragging.”

And

“Keep your face always toward the sunshine – and shadows will fall behind you.”

And

“There is no week nor day nor hour when tyranny may not enter upon this country, if the people lose their roughness and spirit of defiance.”

And

“The genius of the United States is not best or most in its executives or legislatures, nor in its ambassadors or authors or colleges, or churches, or parlors, nor even in its newspapers or inventors, but always most in the common people.”

And

“Have you learned the lessons only of those who admired you, and were tender with you, and stood aside for you? Have you not learned great lessons from those who braced themselves against you, and disputed passage with you?”

And

“Oh while I live, to be the ruler of life, not a slave, to meet life as a powerful conqueror, and nothing exterior to me will ever take command of me.”

And

“I am as bad as the worst, but, thank God, I am as good as the best.”

And

“I no doubt deserved my enemies, but I don’t believe I deserved my friends.”

And

“Be curious, not judgmental.”

And

“I see great things in baseball. It’s our game – the American game.”

And

“Behold I do not give lectures or a little charity, When I give I give myself.”

And

“The future is no more uncertain than the present.”

And

‘Nothing endures but personal qualities.”

And

“The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.”

And

“All faults may be forgiven of him who has perfect candor.”

Wikipedia:  Walt Whitman

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, March 23, 2018 – Bill Russell

 

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“Concentration and mental toughness are the margins of victory.”

And

“Durability is part of what makes a great athlete.”

And

“The idea is not to block every shot. The idea is to make your opponent believe that you might block every shot.”

And

“To me, one of the most beautiful things to see is a group of men coordinating their efforts toward a common goal, alternately subordinating and asserting themselves to achieve real teamwork in action. I tried to do that, we all tried to do that, on the Celtics. I think we succeeded.”

And

“What do you think of the Chicago Bulls winning three in a row?” — Russell: “Not much.” In perspective, Russell won eight times in a row with the Celtics.

Wikipedia:  Bill Russell

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, March 22, 2018 – Bud Wilkinson

 

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“Football in its purest form remains a physical fight. As in any fight, if you don’t want to fight, it’s impossible to win.”

And

“Morale and attitude are the fundamental ingredients to success.”

And

“If a team is to reach its potential, each player must willingly subordinate his own personal goals to the good of the team.”

And

“We compete, not so much against an opponent, but against ourselves. The real test is this: Did I make my best effort on every play?”

And

“I feel more strongly about this than anything else in coaching: Anybody who lacks discipline, who doesn’t want to be part of the team, who doesn’t want to meet the requirements – has to go. It’s that simple.”

And

“The man who tried his best and failed is superior to the man who never tried.”

And

“Losing is easy. It’s not enjoyable, but it’s easy.”

And

“If you are going to be a champion, you must be willing to pay a greater price.”

Wikipedia:  Bud Wilkinson

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