Daily Archive: October 21, 2018

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, October 22, 2018 – B. B. King

BBKing271

“Jazz is the big brother of the blues. If a guy’s playing blues like we play, he’s in high school. When he starts playing jazz it’s like going on to college, to a school of higher learning.”

And

“When people treat you mean, you dislike them for that, but not because of their person, who they are. I was born and raised in a segregated society, but when I left there, I had nobody I disliked other than the people that’d mistreated me, and that only lasted for as long as they were mistreating me.”

And

“I don’t have a favorite song that I’ve written. But I do have a favorite song: ‘Always on My Mind,’ the Willie Nelson version. If I could sing it like he do, I would sing it every night. I like the story it tells.”

And

“I don’t care for the music when they’re talking bad about women because I think women are God’s greatest gift to the planet – I just like music.”

And

“I was born on a plantation, and things weren’t so good. We didn’t have any money. I never thought of the word ‘poor’ ’til I got to be a man, but when you live in a house that you can always peek out of and see what kind of day it is, you’re not doing so well. And your rest room is not inside the house.”

And

“I’ve said that playing the blues is like having to be black twice. Stevie Ray Vaughan missed on both counts, but I never noticed.”

And

“Everybody wants to go to Heaven, but no one wants to die to get there!”

And

“My mother was a very beautiful lady, I thought. She was very good to me. I guess – she died when I was nine and a half, but if she had lived, I probably wouldn’t be trying to play guitar. She wanted me to be known, but as something else. Not a guitar player.”

And

“The beautiful thing about learning is nobody can take it away from you.”

And

“I liked blues from the time my mother used to take me to church. I started to listen to gospel music, so I liked that. But I had an aunt at that time, my mother’s aunt who bought records by people like Lonnie Johnson, Robert Johnson, Blind Lemon Jefferson, and a few others.”

And

“I don’t like anybody to be angry with me. I’d rather have friends.”

And

“We all have idols. Play like anyone you care about but try to be yourself while you’re doing so.”

And

“When I do eventually drop, I pray to God that it’ll happen in one of three ways. Firstly, on stage or leaving the stage, then secondly in my sleep. And the third way? You’ll have to figure that out for yourself!”

And

“I never use that word, retire.”

And

“There are so many sounds I still want to make, so many things I haven’t yet done.”

And

“Growing up, I was taught that a man has to defend his family. When the wolf is trying to get in, you gotta stand in the doorway.”

And

“The blues was bleeding the same blood as me.”

And

“It seems like I always had to work harder than other people. Those nights when everybody else is asleep, and you sit in your room trying to play scales.”

And

“The blues was like that problem child that you may have had in the family. You was a little bit ashamed to let anybody see him, but you loved him. You just didn’t know how other people would take it.”

And

“I think of guitar players in terms of doctors: you have the doctor for your heart, the cardiologist, then one that works on your feet, your leg. But I believe George Benson is the one that plays all over. To me, he would be the M.D. of them all.”

And

“When you don’t have much money, you worry that they’ll just put you in the ground someplace and your loved ones won’t know where you are.”

And

“As for my band, well, my mentors were Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Jimmie Lunceford, and no one had a band more smartly dressed than Duke.”

And

“I would sit on the street corners in my hometown of Indianola, Mississippi, and I would play. And, generally, I would start playing gospel songs.”

And

“I call myself a blues singer, but you ain’t never heard me call myself a blues guitar man.”

And

“If there was no ladies, I wouldn’t wanna be on the planet. Ladies, friends, and music – without those three, I wouldn’t wanna be here.”

And

“Everything I record, I just try to sound like me and come up with songs that suit what I do, and then just go for it.”

And

“If you can’t get your songs to people one way, you have to find another.”

And

“I don’t try to just be a blues singer – I try to be an entertainer. That has kept me going.”

And

“What don’t I want to learn? I have how-to books, history, nature. Ain’t nobody here saying, ‘You’d better learn this.’ But I still think I’ve got a head on my shoulders, and it pleases me.”

And

“If you want to be a good blues singer, people are going to be down on you, so dress like you’re going to the bank to borrow money.”

And

“I guess you can look at me, and tell I’m the old man. My name is BB King.”

And

“I never wanted to be like other blues singers. I might like hearing them play, but I’ve never wanted to be anyone other than myself. There are a few people that I’ve wished I could play like, but when I tried, it didn’t work.”

Wikipedia:  B. B. King

www.bbking.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 21, 2018 – F. Scott Fitzgerald

“A big man has no time really to do anything but just sit and be big.”

And

“Action is character.”

And

“Advertising is a racket, like the movies and the brokerage business. You cannot be honest without admitting that its constructive contribution to humanity is exactly minus zero.”

And

“An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmaster of ever afterwards.”

And

“Either you think, or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.”

And

“Every one suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues.”

And

“First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.”

And

“Genius is the ability to put into effect what is on your mind.”

And

“I like people and I like them to like me, but I wear my heart where God put it, on the inside.”

And

“Life is essentially a cheat and its conditions are those of defeat; the redeeming things are not happiness and pleasure but the deeper satisfactions that come out of struggle.”

And

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

And

“Scratch a Yale man with both hands and you’ll be lucky to find a coast-guard. Usually you find nothing at all.”

And

“Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy.”

And

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“You don’t write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.”

And

“Once one is caught up into the material world not one person in ten thousand finds the time to form literary taste, to examine the validity of philosophic concepts for himself, or to form what, for lack of a better phrase, I might call the wise and tragic sense of life.”

Amd

“Isn’t Hollywood a dump — in the human sense of the word. A hideous town, pointed up by the insulting gardens of its rich, full of the human spirit at a new low of debasement.”

And

“Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft, where we are hard, cynical where we are trustful, in a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to understand.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“Before I go on with this short history, let me make a general observation – the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise. This philosophy fitted on to my early adult life, when I saw the improbable, the implausible, often the “impossible,” come true.”

And

“All good writing is swimming under water and holding your breath.

And

“My generation of radicals and breakers-down never found anything to take the place of the old virtues of work and courage and the old graces of courtesy and politeness.”

And

“Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy.”

And

“On the last night, with my trunk packed and my car sold to the grocer, I went over and looked at that huge incoherent failure of a house once more. On the white steps an obscene word, scrawled by some boy with a piece of brick, stood out clearly in the moonlight, and I erased it, drawing my shoe raspingly along the stone. Then I wandered down to the beach and sprawled out on the sand.

Most of the big shore places were closed now and there were hardly any lights except the shadowy, moving glow of a ferryboat across the Sound. And as the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes—a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” The Ending of The Great Gatsby, 1925

Wikipedia:  F. Scott Fitzgerald

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