Monthly Archive: May 2019

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, May 11, 2019 – Mark Twain

“At last the lake burst upon us–a noble sheet of blue water lifted six thousand three hundred feet above the level of the sea, and walled in by a rim of snow-clad mountain peaks that towered aloft three thousand feet higher still! As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole world affords.”  Mark Twain on Lake Tahoe, Roughing It, 1861

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“It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native criminal class except Congress.”

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“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

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“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.”

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“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

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“A man is never more truthful than when he acknowledges himself a liar.”

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“A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. “

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“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.”

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“Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

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“Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.”

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“Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

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“Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today.”

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“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

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“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”

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“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

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“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

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“There are lies, damned lies and statistics.”

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“The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

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“A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation.”

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“When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.”

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“All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.”

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“My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.”

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“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.”

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“The most interesting information comes from children, for they tell all they know and then stop.”

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“Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.”

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“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”

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“The trouble ain’t that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain’t distributed right.”

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“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”

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“Substitute “damn” every time you’re inclined to write “very”; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

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“When angry, count to four; when very angry, swear.”

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“Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.”

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‘There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded.”

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“A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

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“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way.”

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“Let us live so that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

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“It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.”

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“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”

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“The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

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“The man who is a pessimist before 48 knows too much; if he is an optimist after it, he knows too little.”

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“The public is the only critic whose opinion is worth anything at all.”

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“I haven’t a particle of confidence in a man who has no redeeming petty vices whatsoever.”

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‘Reader, suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.”

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“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—’tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

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“Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our hardnesses yield, all our irritations and resentments flit away and a sunny spirit takes their place.”

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“I was sorry to have my name mentioned as one of the great authors, because they have a sad habit of dying off. Chaucer is dead, Spencer is dead, so is Milton, so is Shakespeare, and I’m not feeling so well myself.”

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“Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest.”

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“The only reason why God created man is because he was disappointed with the monkey.”

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“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

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“Always acknowledge a fault frankly. This will throw those in authority off their guard and give you opportunity to commit more.”

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“Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered — either by themselves or by others. But for the Civil War, Lincoln and Grant and Sherman and Sheridan would not have been discovered, nor have risen into notice. … I have touched upon this matter in a small book which I wrote a generation ago and which I have not published as yet — Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven. When Stormfield arrived in heaven he … was told that … a shoemaker … was the most prodigious military genius the planet had ever produced.”

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“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.” The Innocents Abroad, 1869

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“He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it — namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

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“Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and…Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

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“France has neither winter nor summer nor morals. Apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.”

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“Familiarity breeds contempt — and children.”

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“In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot”

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“Never let your schooling interfere with your education.”

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“Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.”

Wikipedia:  Mark Twain

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, May 10, 2019 – Chester William Nimitz

“I do believe we are going to have a major war, with Japan and Germany, and that the war is going to start by a very serious surprise attack and defeat of U.S. armed forces, and that there is going to be a major revulsion on the part of the political power in Washington against all those in command at sea, and they are going to be thrown out, though it won’t be their fault necessarily. And I wish to be in a position of sufficient prominence so that I will then be considered as one to be sent to sea, because that appears to be the route.” 

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“A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder.”

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“Through the skill and devotion to duty of their armed forces of all branches in the Midway area our citizens can now rejoice that a momentous victory is in the making.”
After the Battle of Midway, CINCPAC Communiqué No. 3, June 6, 1942

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“Is the proposed operation likely to succeed?
What might be the consequences of failure?
Is it in the realm of practicability in terms of material and supplies?”
“Three favorite rules of thumb” Nimitz had printed on a card he kept on his desk

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“They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side…To them, we have a solemn obligation — the obligation to ensure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live.” Of those who died in the war in the Pacific, after ceremonies in Tokyo Bay accepting the official surrender of Japan, September 2, 1945

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“The U.S.’s major strength factor and weapon is its economy. If you cripple it, you cripple the military.” 

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“That is not to say that we can relax our readiness to defend ourselves. Our armament must be adequate to the needs, but our faith is not primarily in these machines of defense but in ourselves.” 

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“God grant me the courage not to give up what I think is right even though I think it is hopeless.”

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“Sir Walter Raleigh declared in the early 17th century that “whoever commands the sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade of the world commands the riches of the world, and consequently the world itself.” This principle is as true today as when uttered, and its effect will continue as long as ships traverse the seas.” Employment of Naval Forces, 1948

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“The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy’s capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor’s will.”

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“The qualities of the Nimitz character were apparent in his face, in his career, and in his heritage; combined these factors made him precisely the man he was and placed him in this particular situation at this moment in history. … He was not a cold man, or a bad tempered man — quite the contrary — to the world he presented a figure of almost total complacency; he seldom lost his temper or raised his voice. … It could be said that King was a driver who knew how to lead; it could also be said that Nimitz was a leader who conquered any personal urge to drive, and achieved his ends more by persuasion and inspiration to men under his command.” Edwin Palmer Hoyt in How They Won the War in the Pacific : Nimitz and His Admirals (2000), p. 28 – 29

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“On April 13, 1943, Allied radio intelligence intercepted a message carrying the travel itinerary of Admiral Yamamoto. The detail in the message listed flight and ground schedules and included what type of fighter escort would be provided. Major Red Lasswell of FRUPAC broke the coded message. The decision of what to do with the information was left to Admiral Nimitz. Nimitz consulted Layton as to what the ramifications would be if Yamamoto were removed. They considered that he might be replaced with a better commander, and Nimitz felt familiar with Yamamoto as his opponent. Layton felt nobody could adequately replace Yamamoto, and based on this opinion Nimitz gave Admiral Halsey the authority to carry out the intercept of Yamamoto’s aircraft. On 18 April, a flight of P-38 fighters with specially selected pilots and equipped with long-range fuel tanks shot down Yamamoto’s aircraft, killing one of Japan’s top naval leaders.” Ricky J. Nussio, in Sherman and Nimitz: Executing Modern Information Operations (2001)

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“He surrounded himself with the ablest men he could find and sought their advice, but he made his own decisions. He was a keen strategist who never forgot that he was dealing with human beings, on both sides of the conflict. He was aggressive in war without hate, audacious while never failing to weigh the risks.” E. B. Potter, Naval historian at the US Naval Academy, quoted on the cover jacket of his book Nimitz (1976)

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“Of the Marines on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

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“He brought to his new job a number of advantages, including experience, a detailed knowledge of his brother officers, and a sense of inner balance and calm that steadied those around him. He had the ability to pick able subordinates and the courage to let them do their jobs without interference. He molded such disparate personalities as the quiet, introspective Raymond A. Spruance and the ebullient, aggressive William F. Halsey, Jr. into an effective team.” Robert William Love, on the rise of Nimitz to CINCPAC in The Chiefs of Naval Operations

Wikipedia: Chester William Nimitz

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, May 9, 2019 – James Dean

JamesDean737

“Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.”

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“There is no way to be truly great in this world. We are all impaled on the crook of conditioning.”

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“Being an actor is the loneliest thing in the world. You are all alone with your concentration and imagination, and that’s all you have.”

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“Only the gentle are ever really strong.”

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“Being a good actor isn’t easy. Being a man is even harder. I want to be both before I’m done.”

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“When an actor plays a scene exactly the way a director orders, it isn’t acting. It’s following instructions. Anyone with the physical qualifications can do that.”

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“If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live on after he’s dead, then maybe he was a great man.”

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“To grasp the full significance of life is the actor’s duty; to interpret it is his problem; and to express it is his dedication.”

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“The gratification comes in the doing, not in the results.”

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“The only greatness for man is immortality.”

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“I also became close to nature, and am now able to appreciate the beauty with which this world is endowed.”

Wikipedia: James Dean

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, May 8, 2019 – Marcus Aurelius

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“A man should be upright, not be kept upright.”

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“A man’s worth is no greater than his ambitions.”

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“Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart.”

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“Be content with what you are, and wish not change; nor dread your last day, nor long for it.”

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“Because your own strength is unequal to the task, do not assume that it is beyond the powers of man; but if anything is within the powers and province of man, believe that it is within your own compass also.”

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“Dig within. Within is the wellspring of Good; and it is always ready to bubble up, if you just dig.”

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“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”

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“If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”

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“It is not death that a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.”

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“Let men see, let them know, a real man, who lives as he was meant to live.”

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“Life is neither good or evil, but only a place for good and evil.”

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“Look back over the past, with its changing empires that rose and fell, and you can foresee the future, too.”

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“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

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“Nothing has such power to broaden the mind as the ability to investigate systematically and truly all that comes under thy observation in life.”

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“Observe constantly that all things take place by change, and accustom thyself to consider that the nature of the Universe loves nothing so much as to change the things which are, and to make new things like them.”

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“The secret of all victory lies in the organization of the non-obvious.”

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“Tomorrow is nothing, today is too late; the good lived yesterday.”

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“Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.”

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“When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive – to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love.”

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“Remember that man lives only in the present, in this fleeting instant; all the rest of his life is either past and gone, or not yet revealed.”

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“At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: “I am called to man’s labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?”

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“Everything–a horse, a vine–is created for some duty…For what task, then, were you yourself created? A man’s true delight is to do the things he was made for.”

Wikipedia: Marcus Aurelius

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, May 7, 2019 – Woody Hayes

WoodyHayes73773

“I’ve had smarter people around me all my life, but I haven’t run into one yet that can outwork me. And if they can’t outwork you, then smarts aren’t going to do them much good. That’s just the way it is. And if you believe that and live by it, you’d be surprised at how much fun you can have.”

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“Without winners, there wouldn’t even be any civilization.”

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“There’s nothing that cleanses your soul like getting the hell kicked out of you.”

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“The height of human desire is what wins, whether it’s on Normandy Beach or in Ohio Stadium.”

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“I’m not coming here looking for security. I came here for the opportunity.” Upon accepting Ohio State head coaching job

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“Paralyze resistance with persistence.”

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“I don’t live in the past. I’m a student of the past, and I try to learn from the past, although some people will say, ‘You haven’t done a very good job of it.’ But for me to live in the past? Hell, no.'”

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“A man is always better than he thinks.”

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“I can accept failure, but I can’t accept not trying.”

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“The time you give a man something he doesn’t earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect.”

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“Success – it ‘s what you do with what you’ve got.”

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“Coaches who can outline plays on a black board are a dime a dozen. The ones who win get inside their players heads and motivate them.”

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“I’m not trying to win a popularity poll. I’m trying to win football games. I don’t like nice people. I like tough, honest people.”

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“I don’t apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there. I just despise to lose, and that has taken a man of mediocre ability and made a pretty good coach out of him.”

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“Just remember one thing. I can do your job, but you can’t do mine.” – to an OSU professor

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“I love football. I think it is most wonderful game in world and I despise to lose.”

Wikipedia:  Woody Hayes

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, May 6, 2019 – Frank Lloyd Wright

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“A free America… means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call democracy is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

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“Early in life I had to choose between honest arrogance and hypocritical humility. I chose the former and have seen no reason to change.”

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“Freedom is from within.”

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“Get the habit of analysis – analysis will in time enable synthesis to become your habit of mind.”

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“Harvard takes perfectly good plums as students, and turns them into prunes.”

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“I believe totally in a Capitalist System, I only wish that someone would try it.”

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“I know the price of success:  dedication, hard work and an unremitting devotion to thing you want to see happen.”

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“Life always rides in strength to victory, not through internationalism… but only through the direct responsibility of the individual.”

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“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.”

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“The heart is the chief feature of a functioning mind.”

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“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.”

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“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

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“The thing always happens that you really believe in; and the belief in a thing makes it happen.”

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“The truth is more important than the facts.”

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“”Think simple” as my old master used to say – meaning reduce the whole of its parts into the simplest terms, getting back to first principles.”

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“There is nothing more uncommon than common sense.”

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“No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It should be of the hill. Belonging to it. Hill and house should live together each the happier for the other.”

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“A free America, democratic in the sense that our forefathers intended it to be, means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call ‘democracy’ is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

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“Every great architect is — necessarily — a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.”

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“Human beings can be beautiful. If they are not beautiful it is entirely their own fault. It is what they do to themselves that makes them ugly. The longer I live the more beautiful life becomes. If you foolishly ignore beauty, you will soon find yourself without it. Your life will be impoverished. But if you invest in beauty, it will remain with you all the days of your life.”

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“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

Wikipedia:  Frank Lloyd Wright

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, May 5, 2019 – Chuck Yeager

“If you want to grow old as a pilot, you’ve got to know when to push it, and when to back off.”

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“Later, I realized that the mission had to end in a let-down because the real barrier wasn’t in the sky but in our knowledge and experience of supersonic flight.”

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“Most pilots learn, when they pin on their wings and go out and get in a fighter, especially, that one thing you don’t do, you don’t believe anything anybody tells you about an airplane.”

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“Never wait for trouble.”

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“Rules are made for people who aren’t willing to make up their own.”

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“You do what you can for as long as you can, and when you finally can’t, you do the next best thing. You back up but you don’t give up.”

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“You don’t concentrate on risks. You concentrate on results. No risk is too great to prevent the necessary job from getting done.”

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“Unfortunately, many people do not consider fun an important item on their daily agenda. For me, that was always high priority in whatever I was doing.”

Wikipedia:  Chuck Yeager

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, May 4, 2019 – Carl Sagan

CarlSagan777

“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.”

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“But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”

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“For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.”

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“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

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“I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students.”

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“I can find in my undergraduate classes, bright students who do not know that the stars rise and set at night, or even that the Sun is a star.”

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“If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits?”

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“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

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“Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere.”

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“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.”

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“Personally, I would be delighted if there were a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out.”

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“Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”

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“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

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“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”

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“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.”

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“The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.”

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“The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent.”

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“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”

and

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

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“Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.”

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“The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what’s true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth — never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key.”

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“Who is more humble? The scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever it has to teach us, or somebody who says everything in this book must be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of all the human beings involved?”

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“The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion and politics, but it is not the path to knowledge; it has no place in the endeavor of science.”

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“Matter is composed chiefly of nothing.”

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“Other things being equal, it is better to be smart than to be stupid.”

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“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

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“Humans are very good at dreaming, although you’d never know it from your television.”

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“In the fabric of space and in the nature of matter, as in a great work of art, there is, written small, the artist’s signature.”

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“We on Earth have just awakened to the great oceans of space and time from which we have emerged. We are the legacy of 15 billion years of cosmic evolution. We have a choice: We can enhance life and come to know the universe that made us, or we can squander our 15 billion-year heritage in meaningless self-destruction. What happens in the first second of the next cosmic year depends on what we do, here and now, with our intelligence and our knowledge of the cosmos.”

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“As a boy Kepler had been captured by a vision of cosmic splendour, a harmony of the worlds which he sought so tirelessly all his life. Harmony in this world eluded him. His three laws of planetary motion represent, we now know, a real harmony of the worlds, but to Kepler they were only incidental to his quest for a cosmic system based on the Perfect Solids, a system which, it turns out, existed only in his mind. Yet from his work, we have found that scientific laws pervade all of nature, that the same rules apply on Earth as in the skies, that we can find a resonance, a harmony, between the way we think and the way the world works. When he found that his long cherished beliefs did not agree with the most precise observations, he accepted the uncomfortable facts, he preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions. That is the heart of science.”

And

“Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

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“A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the Moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the Moon these days.”

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“Education on the value of free speech and the other freedoms reserved by the Bill of Rights, about what happens when you don’t have them, and about how to exercise and protect them, should be an essential prerequisite for being an American citizen — or indeed a citizen of any nation, the more so to the degree that such rights remain unprotected. If we can’t think for ourselves, if we’re unwilling to question authority, then we’re just putty in the hands of those in power. But if the citizens are educated and form their own opinions, then those in power work for us. In every country, we should be teaching our children the scientific method and the reasons for a Bill of Rights. With it comes a certain decency, humility and community spirit. In the demon-haunted world that we inhabit by virtue of being human, this may be all that stands between us and the enveloping darkness.”

And

“When we consider the founders of our nation: Jefferson, Washington, Samuel and John Adams, Madison and Monroe, Benjamin Franklin, Tom Paine and many others; we have before us a list of at least ten and maybe even dozens of great political leaders. They were well educated. Products of the European Enlightenment, they were students of history. They knew human fallibility and weakness and corruptibility. They were fluent in the English language. They wrote their own speeches. They were realistic and practical, and at the same time motivated by high principles. They were not checking the pollsters on what to think this week. They knew what to think. They were comfortable with long-term thinking, planning even further ahead than the next election. They were self-sufficient, not requiring careers as politicians or lobbyists to make a living. They were able to bring out the best in us. They were interested in and, at least two of them, fluent in science. They attempted to set a course for the United States into the far future — not so much by establishing laws as by setting limits on what kinds of laws could be passed. The Constitution and its Bill of Rights have done remarkably well, constituting, despite human weaknesses, a machine able, more often than not, to correct its own trajectory. At that time, there were only about two and a half million citizens of the United States. Today there are about a hundred times more. So if there were ten people of the caliber of Thomas Jefferson then, there ought to be 10 x 100 = 1,000 Thomas Jefferson’s today. Where are they?”

Wikipedia:  Carl Sagan

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, May 3, 2019 – Ernie Banks

ErnieBanks737

“It’s a beautiful day for a ball game…. Let’s play two!” 

And

“But it all comes down to friendship, treating people right.”

And

“I learned from Mr. Wrigley, early in my career, that loyalty wins and it creates friendships. I saw it work for him in his business.”

And

“It’s a kind of philosophy of my own life, to create the energy enough to keep on going.”

And

“Loyalty and friendship, which is to me the same, created all the wealth that I’ve ever thought I’d have.”

And

“Mr. Wrigley believed in this: Put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket. They don’t do that today. This is the old-fashioned way I’m talking about. He carried it on to his business. Do one thing and stay with it.”

And

“The riches of the game are in the thrills, not the money.”

Wikipedia Page:  Ernie Banks

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Coaches Hot Seat Blog Quotes of the Day – Thursday, May 2, 2019 – Louis L’Amour

“A good beginning makes a good end.” 

And

“A wise man fights to win, but he is twice a fool who has no plan for possible defeat.”

And

“All loose things seem to drift down to the sea, and so did I.”

And

“Anger is a killing thing: it kills the man who angers, for each rage leaves him less than he had been before – it takes something from him.” 

And

“For one who reads, there is no limit to the number of lives that may be lived, for fiction, biography, and history offer an inexhaustible number of lives in many parts of the world, in all periods of time.”

And

“He might never really do what he said, but at least he had it in mind. He had somewhere to go.”

And

“Knowledge is like money: to be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.” 

And

“No memory is ever alone; it’s at the end of a trail of memories, a dozen trails that each have their own associations.”

And

“No one can get an education, for of necessity education is a continuing process.”

And

“Nobody got anywhere in the world by simply being content.”

And

“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. Yet that will be the beginning.”

And

“To disbelieve is easy; to scoff is simple; to have faith is harder.”

And

“To make democracy work, we must be a notion of participants, not simply observers. One who does not vote has no right to complain.”

And

“Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen.”

And

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”

And

“One day I was speeding along at the typewriter, and my daughter – who was a child at the time – asked me, “Daddy, why are you writing so fast?” And I replied, “Because I want to see how the story turns out!”

Wikipedia:  Louis L’Amour

www.louislamour.com

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