Tag Archive: Coaches Hot Seat

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, June 3, 2020 – Robert Louis Stevenson

“A friend is a gift you give yourself.”

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“All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.”

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“An aim in life is the only fortune worth finding.”

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“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”

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“Everyone lives by selling something.”

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“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.”

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“I never weary of great churches. It is my favorite kind of mountain scenery. Mankind was never so happily inspired as when it made a cathedral.”

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“It is the mark of a good action that it appears inevitable in retrospect.”

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“Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.”

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“Most of our pocket wisdom is conceived for the use of mediocre people, to discourage them from ambitious attempts, and generally console them in their mediocrity.”

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“Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation and is thought necessary.”

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“Talk is by far the most accessible of pleasures. It costs nothing in money, it is all profit, it completes our education, founds and fosters our friendships, and can be enjoyed at any age and in almost any state of health.”

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“The world has no room for cowards.”

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“To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

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“To become what we are capable of becoming is the only end in life.”

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“We must accept life for what it actually is – a challenge to our quality without which we should never know of what stuff we are made, or grow to our full stature.”

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“You cannot run away from weakness; you must some time fight it out or perish; and if that be so, why not now, and where you stand?”

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“You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us.”

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“So long as we love we serve; so long as we are loved by others, I would almost say that we are indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend.”

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“The Monterey Peninsula is the greatest meeting of land and sea in the world.”

Wikipedia:  Robert Louis Stevenson

RLS77

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 2, 2020 – Johnny Unitas

“There is a difference between conceit and confidence. Conceit is bragging about yourself. Confidence means you believe you can get the job done.”

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“I always thought I could play pro ball. I had confidence in my ability, You have to. If you don’t who will?”

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“My father was totally dedicated to this game and made sure everybody on the team was just as dedicated, because it is the ultimate team sport.”

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“Anything I do, I always have a reason for.”

Wikipedia:  Johnny Unitas

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 1, 2020 – Jack London

JackLondon777

“I do not live for what the world thinks of me, but for what I think of myself.”

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“There is an ecstasy that marks the summit of life, and beyond which life cannot rise. And such is the paradox of living, this ecstasy comes when one is most alive, and it comes as a complete forgetfulness that one is alive.”

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“The trouble with him was that he was without imagination. He was quick and alert in the things of life, but only in the things, and not in the significances.”

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“I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.”

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“Life is not always a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes, playing a poor hand well.”

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“There are things greater than our wisdom, beyond our justice. The right and wrong of this we cannot say, and it is not for us to judge.”

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“He lacked the wisdom, and the only way for him to get it was to buy it with his youth; and when wisdom was his, youth would have been spent buying it”

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“San Francisco is gone. Nothing remains of it but memories.”

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“If cash comes with fame, come fame; if cash comes without fame, come cash.”

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“You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”

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“Fiction pays best of all and when it is of fair quality is more easily sold. A good joke will sell quicker than a good poem, and, measured in sweat and blood, will bring better remuneration. Avoid the unhappy ending, the harsh, the brutal, the tragic, the horrible – if you care to see in print things you write. (In this connection don’t do as I do, but do as I say.) Humour is the hardest to write, easiest to sell, and best rewarded… Don’t write too much. Concentrate your sweat on one story, rather than dissipate it over a dozen. Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will nonetheless get something that looks remarkably like it.”

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“A bone to the dog is not charity. Charity is the bone shared with the dog, when you are just as hungry as the dog.”

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“Affluence means influence.”

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“Darn the wheel of the world! Why must it continually turn over? Where is the reverse gear?”

Wikipedia: Jack London

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, May 31, 2020 – Mark Twain

“At last the lake burst upon us–a noble sheet of blue water lifted six thousand three hundred feet above the level of the sea, and walled in by a rim of snow-clad mountain peaks that towered aloft three thousand feet higher still! As it lay there with the shadows of the mountains brilliantly photographed upon its still surface, I thought it must surely be the fairest picture the whole world affords.”  Mark Twain on Lake Tahoe, Roughing It, 1861

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“It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctly native criminal class except Congress.”

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“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

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“Go to Heaven for the climate, Hell for the company.”

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“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

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“A man is never more truthful than when he acknowledges himself a liar.”

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“A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way. “

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“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.”

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“Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

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“Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.”

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“Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it doesn’t matter.”

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“Apparently there is nothing that cannot happen today.”

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“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear, not absence of fear.”

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“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”

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“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.”

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“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.”

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“There are lies, damned lies and statistics.”

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“The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

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“A man’s character may be learned from the adjectives which he habitually uses in conversation.”

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“When we remember we are all mad, the mysteries disappear and life stands explained.”

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“All you need is ignorance and confidence and the success is sure.”

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“My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it.”

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“The only way to keep your health is to eat what you don’t want, drink what you don’t like, and do what you’d rather not.”

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“The most interesting information comes from children, for they tell all they know and then stop.”

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“Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen.”

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“Against the assault of laughter nothing can stand.”

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“The trouble ain’t that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain’t distributed right.”

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“I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it.”

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“Substitute “damn” every time you’re inclined to write “very”; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

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“When angry, count to four; when very angry, swear.”

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“Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.”

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‘There are basically two types of people. People who accomplish things, and people who claim to have accomplished things. The first group is less crowded.”

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“A person with a new idea is a crank until the idea succeeds.”

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“I don’t give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way.”

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“Let us live so that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.”

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“It’s no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense.”

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“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”

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“The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

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“The man who is a pessimist before 48 knows too much; if he is an optimist after it, he knows too little.”

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“The public is the only critic whose opinion is worth anything at all.”

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“I haven’t a particle of confidence in a man who has no redeeming petty vices whatsoever.”

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‘Reader, suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself.”

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“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter—’tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.”

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“Humor is the great thing, the saving thing. The minute it crops up, all our hardnesses yield, all our irritations and resentments flit away and a sunny spirit takes their place.”

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“I was sorry to have my name mentioned as one of the great authors, because they have a sad habit of dying off. Chaucer is dead, Spencer is dead, so is Milton, so is Shakespeare, and I’m not feeling so well myself.”

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“Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest.”

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“The only reason why God created man is because he was disappointed with the monkey.”

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“Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

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“Always acknowledge a fault frankly. This will throw those in authority off their guard and give you opportunity to commit more.”

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“Thousands of geniuses live and die undiscovered — either by themselves or by others. But for the Civil War, Lincoln and Grant and Sherman and Sheridan would not have been discovered, nor have risen into notice. … I have touched upon this matter in a small book which I wrote a generation ago and which I have not published as yet — Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven. When Stormfield arrived in heaven he … was told that … a shoemaker … was the most prodigious military genius the planet had ever produced.”

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“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.” The Innocents Abroad, 1869

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“He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it — namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

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“Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and…Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.” The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876

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“France has neither winter nor summer nor morals. Apart from these drawbacks it is a fine country.”

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“Familiarity breeds contempt — and children.”

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“In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot”

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“Never let your schooling interfere with your education.”

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“Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.”

Wikipedia:  Mark Twain

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, May 30, 2020 – George Allen

“Each of us has been put on earth with the ability to do something well. We cheat ourselves and the world if we don’t use that ability as best we can.”

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“Every day you waste is one you can never make up.”

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“One of the most difficult things everyone has to learn is that for your entire life you must keep fighting and adjusting if you hope to survive. No matter who you are or what your position is you must keep fighting for whatever it is you desire to achieve.”

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“People of mediocre ability sometimes achieve outstanding success because they don’t know when to quit. Most men succeed because they are determined to.”

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“Winning is the science of being totally prepared.”

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“Every time you win, you’re reborn; when you lose, you die a little.”

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“Work hard, stay positive, and get up early. It’s the best part of the day.”

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“The achiever is the only individual who is truly alive.”

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“The future? This team hasn’t been to the playoffs in over two decades and you’re worried about the future? The Future is Now!”

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“Football isn’t necessarily won by the best players. It’s won by the team with the best attitude.”

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“Football is one-third offense, one-third defense, and one-third special teams.”

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“If you can accept defeat and open your pay envelope without feeling guilty, you’re stealing.”

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“Try not to do too many things at once. Know what you want, the number one thing today and tomorrow. Persevere and get it done.”

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“Success is what you do with your ability. It’s how you use your talent.”

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“Leisure time is that five or six hours when you sleep at night.”

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“The street to obscurity is paved with athletes who can perform great feats before friendly crowds.”

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“The tougher the job, the greater the reward.”

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“Forget the past- the future will give you plenty to worry about”

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“How badly do you want it?”

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“Persevere and get it done.”

Wikipedia: George Allen

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, May 29, 2020 – Tennessee Williams

TennesseeWilliams78282

“A high station in life is earned by the gallantry with which appalling experiences are survived with grace.”

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“All of us are guinea pigs in the laboratory of God. Humanity is just a work in progress.”

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“Death is one moment, and life is so many of them.”

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“Don’t look forward to the day you stop suffering, because when it comes you’ll know you’re dead.”

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“Enthusiasm is the most important thing in life.”

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“For time is the longest distance between two places.”

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“Hell is yourself and the only redemption is when a person puts himself aside to feel deeply for another person.”

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“I have always been pushed by the negative. The apparent failure of a play sends me back to my typewriter that very night, before the reviews are out. I am more compelled to get back to work than if I had a success.”

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“I have found it easier to identify with the characters who verge upon hysteria, who were frightened of life, who were desperate to reach out to another person. But these seemingly fragile people are the strong people really.”

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“If the writing is honest it cannot be separated from the man who wrote it.”

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“In memory everything seems to happen to music.”

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“Life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quickly you hardly catch it going.”

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“Life is an unanswered question, but let’s still believe in the dignity and importance of the question.”

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“Life is partly what we make it, and partly what it is made by the friends we choose.”

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Luck is believing you’re lucky.

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“Luxury is the wolf at the door and its fangs are the vanities and conceits germinated by success. When an artist learns this, he knows where the danger is.”

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“Mendacity is a system that we live in. Liquor is one way out an death’s the other.”

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“Most of the confidence which I appear to feel, especially when influenced by noon wine, is only a pretense.”

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“Oh, you weak, beautiful people who give up with such grace. What you need is someone to take hold of you – gently, with love, and hand your life back to you.”

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“Once you fully apprehend the vacuity of a life without struggle, you are equipped with the basic means of salvation.”

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“Some mystery should be left in the revelation of character in a play, just as a great deal of mystery is always left in the revelation of character in life, even in one’s own character to himself.”

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“Success and failure are equally disastrous.”

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“Success is blocked by concentrating on it and planning for it… Success is shy – it won’t come out while you’re watching.”

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“The future is called ‘perhaps,’ which is the only possible thing to call the future. And the important thing is not to allow that to scare you.”

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“The only thing worse than a liar is a liar that’s also a hypocrite!”

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“The strongest influences in my life and my work are always whomever I love. Whomever I love and am with most of the time, or whomever I remember most vividly. I think that’s true of everyone, don’t you?”

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“Time rushes towards us with its hospital tray of infinitely varied narcotics, even while it is preparing us for its inevitably fatal operation.”

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“To be free is to have achieved your life.”

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“We all live in a house on fire, no fire department to call; no way out, just the upstairs window to look out of while the fire burns the house down with us trapped, locked in it.”

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“When I stop working the rest of the day is posthumous. I’m only really alive when I’m writing.”

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“Why did I write? Because I found life unsatisfactory.”

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“You can be young without money but you can’t be old without it.”

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“The theatre is a place where one has time for the problems of people to whom one would show the door if they came to one’s office for a job.”

Wikipedia:  Tennessee Williams

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, May 28, 2020 – Ernest Shackleton

ErnestShackleton73748

“By endurance we conquer.”

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“Difficulties are just things to overcome, after all.”

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“Superhuman effort isn’t worth a damn unless it achieves results.”

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“We had seen God in His splendors, heard the text that Nature renders. We had reached the naked soul of man.”

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“Optimism is true moral courage.”

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“Leadership is a fine thing, but it has its penalties. And the greatest penalty is loneliness.”

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“A man must shape himself to a new mark directly the old one goes to ground.”

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“I have often marveled at the thin line which separates success from failure.”

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“You often have to hide from them not only the truth, but your feelings about the truth. You may know that the facts are dead against you, but you mustn’t say so.”

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“If you’re a leader, a fellow that other fellows look to, you’ve got to keep going.”

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Shackleton’s Leadership of the Endurance Expedition, Charles Chappell, Wharton Exeutive MBS Program (pdf)

Lessons in Leadership

1. Put your people first
2. Be flexible in tactics
3. Choose your people carefully – for character, not just competence
4. Sustain optimism in the face of adversity
5. Lead by example
6. Strive for equal treatment
7. Exercise caution in pursuit of the goal
8. Balance optimism with realism

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Leadership Lessons From the Shackleton Expedition, Nancy F. Koehin, New York Times

Wikipedia: Ernest Shackleton

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, May 27, 2020 – Helen Keller

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”

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“Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.”

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“Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.”

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“I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.”

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“It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision.”

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“Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood.”

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“Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing.”

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“True happiness… is not attained through self-gratification, but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.”

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“My share of the work may be limited, but the fact that it is work makes it precious.”

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“Never bend your head. Always hold it high. Look the world straight in the eye.”

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“Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.”

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“People do not like to think. If one thinks, one must reach conclusions. Conclusions are not always pleasant.”

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“The highest result of education is tolerance.”

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“Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.”

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“We can do anything we want to if we stick to it long enough.”

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“While they were saying among themselves it cannot be done, it was done.”

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“One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.”

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“We differ, blind and seeing, one from another, not in our senses, but in the use we make of them, in the imagination and courage with which we seek wisdom beyond the senses.”

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“Tyranny cannot defeat the power of ideas.”

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“Miss Sullivan touched my forehead and spelled with decided emphasis, “Think.”  In a flash I knew that the word was the name of the process that was going on in my head. This was my first conscious perception of an abstract idea.  For a long time I was still … trying to find a meaning for “love” in the light of this new idea. The sun had been under a cloud all day, and there had been brief showers; but suddenly the sun broke forth in all its southern splendour.  Again I asked my teacher, “Is this not love?”

“Love is something like the clouds that were in the sky before the sun came out,” she replied. Then in simpler words than these, which at that time I could not have understood, she explained:

“You cannot touch the clouds, you know; but you feel the rain and know how glad the flowers and the thirsty earth are to have it after a hot day. You cannot touch love either; but you feel the sweetness that it pours into everything. Without love you would not be happy or want to play.”

The beautiful truth burst upon my mind — I felt that there were invisible lines stretched between my spirit and the spirits of others.”

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“No matter how dull, or how mean, or how wise a man is, he feels that happiness is his indisputable right.”

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“A happy life consists not in the absence, but in the mastery of hardships.”

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“Many persons have a wrong idea of what constitutes true happiness. It is not attained through self-gratification but through fidelity to a worthy purpose.”

Wikipedia:  Helen Keller

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, May 26, 2020 – Michael Crichton

MichaelCrichton2882

“If you don’t know history, then you don’t know anything. You are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree.”

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“Do you know what we call opinion in the absence of evidence? We call it prejudice.” State of Fear

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“It’s better to die laughing than to live each moment in fear.”

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“What makes you think human beings are sentient and aware? There’s no evidence for it. Human beings never think for themselves, they find it too uncomfortable. For the most part, members of our species simply repeat what they are told-and become upset if they are exposed to any different view. The characteristic human trait is not awareness but conformity, and the characteristic result is religious warfare. Other animals fight for territory or food; but, uniquely in the animal kingdom, human beings fight for their ‘beliefs.’ The reason is that beliefs guide behavior which has evolutionary importance among human beings. But at a time when our behavior may well lead us to extinction, I see no reason to assume we have any awareness at all. We are stubborn, self-destructive conformists. Any other view of our species is just a self-congratulatory delusion. Next question.” The Lost World

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“God creates dinosaurs, God kills dinosaurs, God creates man, man kills God, man brings back dinosaurs.” Jurassic Park

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“The planet has survived everything, in its time. It will certainly survive us.” Jurassic Park

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“You think man can destroy the planet? What intoxicating vanity. Let me tell you about our planet. Earth is four-and-a-half-billion-years-old. There’s been life on it for nearly that long, 3.8 billion years. Bacteria first; later the first multicellular life, then the first complex creatures in the sea, on the land. Then finally the great sweeping ages of animals, the amphibians, the dinosaurs, at last the mammals, each one enduring millions on millions of years, great dynasties of creatures rising, flourishing, dying away — all this against a background of continuous and violent upheaval. Mountain ranges thrust up, eroded away, cometary impacts, volcano eruptions, oceans rising and falling, whole continents moving, an endless, constant, violent change, colliding, buckling to make mountains over millions of years. Earth has survived everything in its time. It will certainly survive us. If all the nuclear weapons in the world went off at once and all the plants, all the animals died and the earth was sizzling hot for a hundred thousand years, life would survive, somewhere: under the soil, frozen in Arctic ice. Sooner or later, when the planet was no longer inhospitable, life would spread again. The evolutionary process would begin again. It might take a few billion years for life to regain its present variety. Of course, it would be very different from what it is now, but the earth would survive our folly, only we would not. If the ozone layer gets thinner, ultraviolet radiation sears the earth, so what? Ultraviolet radiation is good for life. It’s powerful energy. It promotes mutation, change. Many forms of life will thrive with more UV radiation. Many others will die out. Do you think this is the first time that’s happened? Think about oxygen. Necessary for life now, but oxygen is actually a metabolic poison, a corrosive glass, like fluorine. When oxygen was first produced as a waste product by certain plant cells some three billion years ago, it created a crisis for all other life on earth. Those plants were polluting the environment, exhaling a lethal gas. Earth eventually had an atmosphere incompatible with life. Nevertheless, life on earth took care of itself. In the thinking of the human being a hundred years is a long time. A hundred years ago we didn’t have cars, airplanes, computers or vaccines. It was a whole different world, but to the earth, a hundred years is nothing. A million years is nothing. This planet lives and breathes on a much vaster scale. We can’t imagine its slow and powerful rhythms, and we haven’t got the humility to try. We’ve been residents here for the blink of an eye. If we’re gone tomorrow, the earth will not miss us.” Jurassic Park

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“I am certain there is too much certainty in the world.”

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“All your life people will tell you things. And most of the time, probably ninety-five percent of the time, what they’ll tell you will be wrong.” The Lost World

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“Praise not the day until evening has come, a woman until she is burnt, a sword until it is tried, a maiden until she is married, ice until it has been crossed, beer until it has been drunk.” Eaters of the Dead

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“It’s hard to decide who’s truly brilliant; it’s easier to see who’s driven, which in the long run may be more important.” Congo

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“Books aren’t written – they’re rewritten. Including your own. It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn’t quite done it.”

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“The purpose of life is to stay alive. Watch any animal in nature–all it tries to do is stay alive. It doesn’t care about beliefs or philosophy. Whenever any animal’s behavior puts it out of touch with the realities of its existence, it becomes exinct.” Congo

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“In the corner store we pulled fat bottles of water from the shelves. No one thinks it’s weird that we have to buy clean water, and that’s how I know we’re going to hell.”

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“In the information society, nobody thinks. We expected to banish paper, but we actually banished thought.”

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“Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray’s case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the “wet streets cause rain” stories. Paper’s full of them. In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.”

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“Human beings are so destructive. I sometimes think we’re a kind of plague, that will scrub the earth clean. We destroy things so well that I sometimes think, maybe that’s our function. Maybe every few eons, some animal comes along that kills off the rest of the world, clears the decks, and lets evolution proceed to its next phase.” The Lost World

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“All your life, other people will try to take your accomplishments away from you. Don’t you take it away from yourself.” The Lost World

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“Anyone who says he knows God’s intention is showing a lot of very human ego.” Next

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“Let’s be clear. The planet is not in jeopardy. We are in jeopardy. We haven’t got the power to destroy the planet – or to save it. But we might have the power to save ourselves.” Jurassic Park

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“In other centuries, human beings wanted to be saved, or improved, or freed, or educated. But in our century, they want to be entertained. The great fear is not of disease or death, but of boredom. A sense of time on our hands, a sense of nothing to do. A sense that we are not amused.” Timeline

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“Raising children is, in a sense, the reason the society exists in the first place. It’s the most important thing that happens, and it’s the culmination of all the tools and language and social structure that has evolved.” The Lost World

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“Historically, the claim of consensus has been the first refuge of scoundrels; it is a way to avoid debate by claiming that the matter is already settled.”

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“All human behavior has a reason. All behavior is solving a problem.” Disclosure

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“A hundred years from now, people will look back on us and laugh. They’ll say, ‘You know what people used to believe? They believed in photons and electrons. Can you imagine anything so silly?’ They’ll have a good laugh, because by then there will be newer better fantasies… And meanwhile, you feel the way the boat moves? That’s the sea. That’s real. You smell the salt in the air? You feel the sunlight on your skin? That’s all real. Life is wonderful. It’s a gift to be alive, to see the sun and breathe the air. And there isn’t really anything else.” The Lost World

And

“Exercise invigorates the body and sharpens the mind.”

And

“Nobody dares to solve the problems-because the solution might contradict your philosophy, and for most people clinging to beliefs is more important than succeeding in the world.” State of Fear

And

“Working inspires inspiration. Keep working. If you succeed, keep working. If you fail, keep working. If you are interested, keep working. If you are bored, keep working.”

And

“His management philosophy, tempered in his rain-dancing days, was always to give the project to whoever had the most to gain from success–or the most to lose from failure.” Congo

And

“The greatest challenge facing mankind is the challenge of distinguishing reality from fantasy, truth from propaganda. Perceiving the truth has always been a challenge to mankind, but in the information age (or as I think of it, the disinformation age) it takes on a special urgency and importance.”

And

“The purpose of history is to explain the present – to say why the world around us is the way it is. History tells us what is important in our world, and how it came to be. It tells us what is to be ignored, or discarded. That is true power – profound power. The power to define a whole society.” Timeline

And

“I want to pause here and talk about this notion of consensus, and the rise of what has been called consensus science. I regard consensus science as an extremely pernicious development that ought to be stopped cold in its tracks. Historically, the claim of consensus has been the first refuge of scoundrels; it is a way to avoid debate by claiming that the matter is already settled. Whenever you hear the consensus of scientists agrees on something or other, reach for your wallet, because you’re being had.

Let’s be clear: the work of science has nothing whatever to do with consensus. Consensus is the business of politics. Science, on the contrary, requires only one investigator who happens to be right, which means that he or she has results that are verifiable by reference to the real world. In science consensus is irrelevant. What is relevant is reproducible results. The greatest scientists in history are great precisely because they broke with the consensus.

There is no such thing as consensus science. If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.”

Wikipedia: Michael Crichton

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, May 25, 2020 – Chester William Nimitz

“I do believe we are going to have a major war, with Japan and Germany, and that the war is going to start by a very serious surprise attack and defeat of U.S. armed forces, and that there is going to be a major revulsion on the part of the political power in Washington against all those in command at sea, and they are going to be thrown out, though it won’t be their fault necessarily. And I wish to be in a position of sufficient prominence so that I will then be considered as one to be sent to sea, because that appears to be the route.” 

And

“A ship is always referred to as “she” because it costs so much to keep her in paint and powder.”

And

“Through the skill and devotion to duty of their armed forces of all branches in the Midway area our citizens can now rejoice that a momentous victory is in the making.”
After the Battle of Midway, CINCPAC Communiqué No. 3, June 6, 1942

And

“Is the proposed operation likely to succeed?
What might be the consequences of failure?
Is it in the realm of practicability in terms of material and supplies?”
“Three favorite rules of thumb” Nimitz had printed on a card he kept on his desk

And

“They fought together as brothers in arms; they died together and now they sleep side by side…To them, we have a solemn obligation — the obligation to ensure that their sacrifice will help make this a better and safer world in which to live.” Of those who died in the war in the Pacific, after ceremonies in Tokyo Bay accepting the official surrender of Japan, September 2, 1945

And

“The U.S.’s major strength factor and weapon is its economy. If you cripple it, you cripple the military.” 

And

“That is not to say that we can relax our readiness to defend ourselves. Our armament must be adequate to the needs, but our faith is not primarily in these machines of defense but in ourselves.” 

And

“God grant me the courage not to give up what I think is right even though I think it is hopeless.”

And

“Sir Walter Raleigh declared in the early 17th century that “whoever commands the sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade of the world commands the riches of the world, and consequently the world itself.” This principle is as true today as when uttered, and its effect will continue as long as ships traverse the seas.” Employment of Naval Forces, 1948

And

“The final objective in war is the destruction of the enemy’s capacity and will to fight, and thereby force him to accept the imposition of the victor’s will.”

And

“The qualities of the Nimitz character were apparent in his face, in his career, and in his heritage; combined these factors made him precisely the man he was and placed him in this particular situation at this moment in history. … He was not a cold man, or a bad tempered man — quite the contrary — to the world he presented a figure of almost total complacency; he seldom lost his temper or raised his voice. … It could be said that King was a driver who knew how to lead; it could also be said that Nimitz was a leader who conquered any personal urge to drive, and achieved his ends more by persuasion and inspiration to men under his command.” Edwin Palmer Hoyt in How They Won the War in the Pacific : Nimitz and His Admirals (2000), p. 28 – 29

And

“On April 13, 1943, Allied radio intelligence intercepted a message carrying the travel itinerary of Admiral Yamamoto. The detail in the message listed flight and ground schedules and included what type of fighter escort would be provided. Major Red Lasswell of FRUPAC broke the coded message. The decision of what to do with the information was left to Admiral Nimitz. Nimitz consulted Layton as to what the ramifications would be if Yamamoto were removed. They considered that he might be replaced with a better commander, and Nimitz felt familiar with Yamamoto as his opponent. Layton felt nobody could adequately replace Yamamoto, and based on this opinion Nimitz gave Admiral Halsey the authority to carry out the intercept of Yamamoto’s aircraft. On 18 April, a flight of P-38 fighters with specially selected pilots and equipped with long-range fuel tanks shot down Yamamoto’s aircraft, killing one of Japan’s top naval leaders.” Ricky J. Nussio, in Sherman and Nimitz: Executing Modern Information Operations (2001)

And

“He surrounded himself with the ablest men he could find and sought their advice, but he made his own decisions. He was a keen strategist who never forgot that he was dealing with human beings, on both sides of the conflict. He was aggressive in war without hate, audacious while never failing to weigh the risks.” E. B. Potter, Naval historian at the US Naval Academy, quoted on the cover jacket of his book Nimitz (1976)

And

“Of the Marines on Iwo Jima, uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

And

“He brought to his new job a number of advantages, including experience, a detailed knowledge of his brother officers, and a sense of inner balance and calm that steadied those around him. He had the ability to pick able subordinates and the courage to let them do their jobs without interference. He molded such disparate personalities as the quiet, introspective Raymond A. Spruance and the ebullient, aggressive William F. Halsey, Jr. into an effective team.” Robert William Love, on the rise of Nimitz to CINCPAC in The Chiefs of Naval Operations

Wikipedia: Chester William Nimitz

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