Tag Archive: Coaches Hot Seat Rankings

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, November 18, 2019 – Harper Lee

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Below – To Kill A Mockingbird Quotes

“I think there’s just one kind of folks. Folks.”

And

“Many receive advice, only the wise profit from it.”

And

“The book to read is not the one which thinks for you, but the one which makes you think. No book in the world equals the Bible for that.”

And

“They’re certainly entitled to think that, and they’re entitled to full respect for their opinions… but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.”

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“First of all,” he said, “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view–until you climb into his skin and walk around it.”

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“Atticus said to Jem one day, “I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. “Your father’s right,” she said. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing except make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corn cribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

And

“With him, life was routine; without him, life was unbearable.”

And

“When a child asks you something, answer him, for goodness sake. But don’t make a production of it. Children are children, but they can spot an evasion faster than adults, and evasion simply muddles ’em.”

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“Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

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“You just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don’t you let ’em get your goat. Try fightin’ with your head for a change.”

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“There is one way in this country in which all men are created equal—there is one human institution that makes a pauper the equal of a Rockefeller, the stupid man the equal of an Einstein, and the ignorant man the equal of any college president. That institution, gentlemen, is the court.”

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“We’re paying the highest tribute you can pay a man. We trust him to do right. It’s that simple.”

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“There are just some kind of men…who’re so busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one.”

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“Ladies in bunches always filled me with vague apprehension and a firm desire to be elsewhere.”

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People in their right minds never take pride in their talents.

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Atticus had said it was the polite thing to talk to people about what they were interested in, not about what you were interested in.

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“Try fighting with your head for a change…it’s a good one, even if it does resist learning.”

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“I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.  It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.  You rarely win, but sometimes you do.”  

Above – To Kill A Mockingbird Quotes

“Well, they’re Southern people, and if they know you are working at home they think nothing of walking right in for coffee. But they wouldn’t dream of interrupting you at golf. ” Harper Lee

And

“Any writer worth his salt writes to please himself…It’s a self-exploratory operation that is endless. An exorcism of not necessarily his demon, but of his divine discontent.” Harper Lee

Wikipedia Page:  Harper Lee

Pat Dye finds Lee’s ‘Mockingbird’ to be a masterpiece

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, November 18, 2019 – Ernest Shackleton

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“By endurance we conquer.”

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“Difficulties are just things to overcome, after all.”

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“Superhuman effort isn’t worth a damn unless it achieves results.”

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“We had seen God in His splendors, heard the text that Nature renders. We had reached the naked soul of man.”

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“Optimism is true moral courage.”

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“Leadership is a fine thing, but it has its penalties. And the greatest penalty is loneliness.”

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“A man must shape himself to a new mark directly the old one goes to ground.”

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“I have often marveled at the thin line which separates success from failure.”

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“You often have to hide from them not only the truth, but your feelings about the truth. You may know that the facts are dead against you, but you mustn’t say so.”

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“If you’re a leader, a fellow that other fellows look to, you’ve got to keep going.”

And

Shackleton’s Leadership of the Endurance Expedition, Charles Chappell, Wharton Exeutive MBS Program (pdf)

Lessons in Leadership

1. Put your people first
2. Be flexible in tactics
3. Choose your people carefully – for character, not just competence
4. Sustain optimism in the face of adversity
5. Lead by example
6. Strive for equal treatment
7. Exercise caution in pursuit of the goal
8. Balance optimism with realism

And

Leadership Lessons From the Shackleton Expedition, Nancy F. Koehin, New York Times

Wikipedia: Ernest Shackleton

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, November 17, 2019 – Arnold Palmer

“Always make a total effort, even when the odds are against you.”

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“Concentration, Confidence, Competitive urge, Capacity for enjoyment.”

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“Golf is deceptively simple and endlessly complicated.”

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“I never quit trying. I never felt that I didn’t have a chance to win.”

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“I never rooted against an opponent, but I never rooted for him either.”

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“I’ve always made a total effort, even when the odds seemed entirely against me. I never quit trying; I never felt that I didn’t have a chance to win.”

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“It is a rare and difficult attainment to grow old gracefully and happily.”

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“Putting is like wisdom – partly a natural gift and partly the accumulation of experience.”

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“Success in golf depends less on strength of body than upon strength of mind and character.”

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“The most rewarding things you do in life are often the ones that look like they cannot be done.”

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“What do I mean by concentration? I mean focusing totally on the business at hand and commanding your body to do exactly what you want it to do.”

And

“Winning isn’t everything, but wanting it is.”

And

“You must play boldly to win.”

Wikipedia: Arnold Palmer

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, November 16, 2019 – Paul Brown

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“A winner never whines.”

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“Football is a game of errors. The team that makes the fewest errors in a game usually wins.”

And

“The key to winning is poise under stress.”

And

“What we have currently available is what we have available.”

And

“When you win, say nothing. When you lose, say less.”

And

“You can learn a line from a win and a book from a defeat.”

Wikipedia:  Paul Brown

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, November 15, 2019 – Walter Hagen

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“You’re only here for a short visit. Don’t hurry, don’t worry. And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”

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“There is no tragedy in missing a putt, no matter how short. All have erred in this respect.”

And

“Make the hard ones look easy and the easy ones look hard.”

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“You don’t have the game you played last year or last week. You only have today’s game. It may be far from your best, but that’s all you’ve got. Harden your heart and make the best of it.”

And

“No one remembers who came in second.”

Wikipedia: Walter Hagen

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, November 14, 2019 – Booker T. Washington

“Associate yourself with people of good quality, for it is better to be alone than in bad company.”

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“Character is power.”

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“Character, not circumstances, makes the man.”

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“Dignify and glorify common labor. It is at the bottom of life that we must begin, not at the top.”

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“Excellence is to do a common thing in an uncommon way.”

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“I have learned that success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has had to overcome while trying to succeed.”

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“If you can’t read, it’s going to be hard to realize dreams.”

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“No greater injury can be done to any youth than to let him feel that because he belongs to this or that race he will be advanced in life regardless of his own merits or efforts.”

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“No race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem.”

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“Nothing ever comes to one, that is worth having, except as a result of hard work.”

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“Success in life is founded upon attention to the small things rather than to the large things; to the every day things nearest to us rather than to the things that are remote and uncommon.”

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“There is no power on earth that can neutralize the influence of a high, simple and useful life.”

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“You can’t hold a man down without staying down with him.”

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“The world cares very little about what a man or woman knows; it is what a man or woman is able to do that counts.”

Wikipedia: Booker T. Washington

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, November 13, 2019 – Arthur Schopenhauer

“A man can be himself only so long as he is alone.”

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“A man can do what he wants, but not want what he wants.”

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“A man’s face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man’s thoughts and aspirations.”

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“All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.”

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“Boredom is just the reverse side of fascination: both depend on being outside rather than inside a situation, and one leads to the other.”

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“Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

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“Honor means that a man is not exceptional; fame, that he is. Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.”

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“If you want to know your true opinion of someone, watch the effect produced in you by the first sight of a letter from him.”

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It is with trifles, and when he is off guard, that a man best reveals his character.

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“Men are by nature merely indifferent to one another; but women are by nature enemies.”

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“Money is human happiness in the abstract; he, then, who is no longer capable of enjoying human happiness in the concrete devotes himself utterly to money.”

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“Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.”

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“The longer a man’s fame is likely to last, the longer it will be in coming.”

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“The man never feels the want of what it never occurs to him to ask for.”

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“The wise have always said the same things, and fools, who are the majority have always done just the opposite.”

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“We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success.”

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“Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame.”

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“It is the courage to make a clean breast of it in the face of every question that makes the philosopher. He must be like Sophocles’ Oedipus, who, seeking enlightenment concerning his terrible fate, pursues his indefatigable inquiry even though he divines that appalling horror awaits him in the answer. But most of us carry with us the Jocasta in our hearts, who begs Oedipus, for God’s sake, not to inquire further.”

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“The bad thing about all religions is that, instead of being able to confess their allegorical nature, they have to conceal it; accordingly, they parade their doctrines in all seriousness as true sensu proprio, and as absurdities form an essential part of these doctrines we have the great mischief of a continual fraud. Nay, what is worse, the day arrives when they are no longer true sensu proprio, and then there is an end of them; so that, in that respect, it would be better to admit their allegorical nature at once. But the difficulty is to teach the multitude that something can be both true and untrue at the same time. Since all religions are in a greater or less degree of this nature, we must recognise the fact that mankind cannot get on without a certain amount of absurdity, that absurdity is an element in its existence, and illusion indispensable; as indeed other aspects of life testify.”

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“Compassion is the basis of all morality.”

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“Life is short and truth works far and lives long: let us speak the truth.”

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“The effect of music is so very much more powerful and penetrating than is that of the other arts, for these others speak only of the shadow, but music of the essence.”

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“In early youth, as we contemplate our coming life, we are like children in a theatre before the curtain is raised, sitting there in high spirits and eagerly waiting for the play to begin.”

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“Do not shorten the morning by getting up late, or waste it in unworthy occupations or in talk; look upon it as the quintessence of life, as to a certain extent sacred. Evening is like old age: we are languid, talkative, silly. Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

And

“To free a man from error does not mean to take something from him, but to give him something.”

Wikipedia:  Arthur Schopenhauer

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, November 12, 2019 – Omar Bradley

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“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

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“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

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“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

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“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

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“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

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“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

And

“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

And

“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

And

“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

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Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, November 11, 2019 – William James

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“A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and life is after all a chain.”

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“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

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“Acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcoming the consequences of any misfortune.”

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“Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.”

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“Action may not bring happiness but there is no happiness without action.”

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“An idea, to be suggestive, must come to the individual with the force of revelation.”

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“Belief creates the actual fact.”

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“Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

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“Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing.”

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“Compared to what we ought to be, we are half awake.”

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“Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.”

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“Do something everyday for no other reason than you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test.”

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“Every man who possibly can should force himself to a holiday of a full month in a year, whether he feels like taking it or not.”

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“Everybody should do at least two things each day that he hates to do, just for practice.”

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“Faith means belief in something concerning which doubt is theoretically possible.”

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“Genius… means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way.”

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“How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure.”

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“Human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind.”

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“I don’t sing because I’m happy; I’m happy because I sing.”

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“If merely ‘feeling good’ could decide, drunkenness would be the supremely valid human experience.”

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“If you care enough for a result, you will most certainly attain it.”

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“If you want a quality, act as if you already had it.”

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“Is life worth living? It all depends on the liver.”

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“It is only by risking our persons from one hour to another that we live at all. And often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true.”

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“Most people never run far enough on their first wind to find out they’ve got a second.”

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“The aim of a college education is to teach you to know a good man when you see one.”

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“The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.”

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“The best argument I know for an immortal life is the existence of a man who deserves one.”

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“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”

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“The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.”

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“The world is all the richer for having a devil in it, so long as we keep our foot upon his neck.”

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“These then are my last words to you. Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

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“To change ones life: Start immediately. Do it flamboyantly.”

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“We are all ready to be savage in some cause. The difference between a good man and a bad one is the choice of the cause.”

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“We don’t laugh because we’re happy – we’re happy because we laugh.”

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“Whenever you’re in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is “attitude.”

Wikipedia Page: William James

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, November 10, 2019 – Ernie Banks

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“It’s a beautiful day for a ball game…. Let’s play two!” 

And

“But it all comes down to friendship, treating people right.”

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“I learned from Mr. Wrigley, early in my career, that loyalty wins and it creates friendships. I saw it work for him in his business.”

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“It’s a kind of philosophy of my own life, to create the energy enough to keep on going.”

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“Loyalty and friendship, which is to me the same, created all the wealth that I’ve ever thought I’d have.”

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“Mr. Wrigley believed in this: Put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket. They don’t do that today. This is the old-fashioned way I’m talking about. He carried it on to his business. Do one thing and stay with it.”

And

“The riches of the game are in the thrills, not the money.”

Wikipedia Page:  Ernie Banks

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