Tag Archive: Coaches Hot Seat

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, June 17, 2020 – Colin Powell

“A dream doesn’t become reality through magic; it takes sweat, determination and hard work.”

And

“Avoid having your ego so close to your position that when your position falls, your ego goes with it.”

And

“Bad news isn’t wine. It doesn’t improve with age.”

And

“Don’t bother people for help without first trying to solve the problem yourself.”

And

“Experts often possess more data than judgment.”

And

“Fit no stereotypes. Don’t chase the latest management fads. The situation dictates which approach best accomplishes the team’s mission.”

And

“Get mad, then get over it.”

And

“Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate and doubt, to offer a solution everybody can understand.”

And

“If you are going to achieve excellence in big things, you develop the habit in little matters. Excellence is not an exception, it is a prevailing attitude.”

And

“Leadership is solving problems. The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership.”

And

“Never neglect details. When everyone’s mind is dulled or distracted the leader must be doubly vigilant.”

And

“No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.”

And

“Organization charts and fancy titles count for next to nothing.”

And

“Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.”

And

“Success is the result of perfection, hard work, learning from failure, loyalty, and persistence.”

And

“Surround yourself with people who take their work seriously, but not themselves, those who work hard and play hard.”

And

“The chief condition on which, life, health and vigor depend on, is action. It is by action that an organism develops its faculties, increases its energy, and attains the fulfillment of its destiny.”

And

“The commander in the field is always right and the rear echelon is wrong, unless proved otherwise.”

And

COLIN POWELL’S 13 RULES OF LEADERSHIP

1.  It ain’t as bad as you think. It will look better in the morning.
2.  Get mad, then get over it.
3.  Avoid having your ego so close to your position that, when your position falls, your ego goes with it.
4.  It can be done!
5.  Be careful what you choose, you may get it.
6.  Don’t let adverse facts stand in the way of a good decision.
7.  You can’t make someone else’s choices. You shouldn’t let someone else make yours.
8.  Check small things.
9.  Share credit.
10.  Remain calm. Be kind.
11.  Have a vision. Be demanding.
12.  Don’t take counsel of your fears or naysayers.
13.  Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.”

And

10 Leadership Tenets from Colin Powell, Stanford Business School

1.  Successful leaders know how to define their mission, convey it to their subordinates and ensure they have the right tools and training needed to get the job done.

2.  “Leadership is all about people…and getting the most out of people.”

3.  Leaders should never show fear or anger. “You have to have a sense of optimism.”

4.  Effective leaders are made, not born. They learn from trial and error, and from experience.

5.  Leadership is about conveying a sense of purpose in a selfless manner and creating conditions of trust while displaying moral and physical courage.

6.  A false leader is someone who fails to get the necessary resources for his or her staff to do their jobs.

7.  “The best leaders are those who can communicate upward the fears and desires of their subordinates, and are willing to fight for what is needed. If not, the organization will weaken and crumble.”

8.  When something fails, a true leader learns from the experience and puts it behind him. “You don’t get reruns in life. Don’t worry about what happened in the past.”

9.  Good leaders must know how to reward those who succeed and know when to retrain, move, or fire ineffective staff.

10.  “You know you’re a good leader when people follow you out of curiosity.”

Wikipedia:  Colin Powell

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 16, 2020 – Albert Camus

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“Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.”

And

“Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear.”

And

“The evil that is in the world almost always comes of ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

And

“But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”

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“Without culture, and the relative freedom it implies, society, even when perfect, is but a jungle. This is why any authentic creation is a gift to the future.”

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“All great deeds and all great thoughts have a ridiculous beginning. Great works are often born on a street corner or in a restaurant’s revolving door.”

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“Truth is mysterious, elusive, always to be conquered. Liberty is dangerous, as hard to live with as it is elating. We must march toward these two goals, painfully but resolutely, certain in advance of our failings on so long a road.”

And

“The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.”

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“The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

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“Those who lack the courage will always find a philosophy to justify it.”

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“Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.”

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“No cause justifies the deaths of innocent people.”

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“Basically, at the very bottom of life, which seduces us all, there is only absurdity, and more absurdity. And maybe that’s what gives us our joy for living, because the only thing that can defeat absurdity is lucidity.”

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“For if there is a sin against life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life.”

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“You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.”

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“Peace is the only battle worth waging.”

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“There are causes worth dying for, but none worth killing for.”

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“I know that man is capable of great deeds. But if he isn’t capable of great emotion, well, he leaves me cold.”

And

“The need to be right — the sign of a vulgar mind.”

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“Seeking what is true is not seeking what is desirable.”

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“People hasten to judge in order not to be judged themselves.”

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“I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn’t, than live my life as if there isn’t and die to find out there is.”

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“Life can be magnificent and overwhelming — that is the whole tragedy. Without beauty, love, or danger it would almost be easy to live. ”

And

“At the heart of all beauty lies something inhuman.”

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“The evil that is in the world almost always comes from ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

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“Freedom is nothing but a chance to be better.”

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“There are crimes of passion and crimes of logic. The boundary between them is not clearly defined.”

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“Where there is no hope, it is incumbent on us to invent it.”

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“I rebel; therefore I exist.”

And

“Real generosity towards the future lies in giving all to the present.”

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“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.”

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“Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time.”

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“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer. And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger — something better, pushing right back.”

And

“There is scarcely any passion without struggle.”

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“Should I kill myself, or have a cup of coffee?”

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“But in the end one needs more courage to live than to kill himself.”

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“Always go too far, because that’s where you’ll find the truth.”

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“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.”

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“The truth is that everyone is bored, and devotes himself to cultivating habits.”

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“He who despairs of the human condition is a coward, but he who has hope for it is a fool.”

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“The habit of despair is worse than despair itself.”

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“But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”

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“My chief occupation, despite appearances, has always been love.”

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“If absolute truth belongs to anyone in this world, it certainly does not belong to the man or party that claims to possess it.”

Wikipedia:  Albert Camus

Is it worth the trouble, Ralph Ammer, Medium.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 15, 2020 – George Washington Carver

“Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.”

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“How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.”

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“When you do the common things in life in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world.”

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“Ninety-nine percent of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.”

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“No individual has any right to come into the world and go out of it without leaving something behind.”

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“Since new developments are the products of a creative mind, we must therefore stimulate and encourage that type of mind in every way possible.”

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“There is no short cut to achievement. Life requires thorough preparation – veneer isn’t worth anything.”

And

“Where there is no vision, there is no hope.”

Wikipedia: George Washington Carver

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, June 14, 2020 – Bobby Jones

Robert Tyre Jones, Jr retired from golf in 1930, at the age of 28, still an amateur, having just won the Grand Slam. Grantland Rice wrote of him:

“One might as well attempt to describe the smoothness of the wind as to paint a clear picture of his complete swing. A consummate gentleman, he also possessed wit, a temper and a keen intellect, and all of these are evident in his many insights into golf and life.”

And

“Golf is the closest game to the game we call life. You get bad breaks from good shots; you get good breaks from bad shots – but you have to play the ball where it lies.”  

And

“Competitive golf is played mainly on a five-and-a-half-inch course…the space between your ears.”

And

“It is nothing new or original to say that golf is played one stroke at a time. But it took me many years to realize it.”

And

“Some people think they are concentrating when they’re merely worrying.”

And

“The secret of golf is to turn three shots into two.”

And

“Golf is assuredly a mystifying game. It would seem that if a person has hit a golf ball correctly a thousand times, he should be able to duplicate the performance at will. But this is certainly not the case.”

And

“Sometimes the game of golf is just too difficult to endure with a golf club in your hands.”

And

Bobby Jones was not only a consummately skilled golfer but exemplified the principles of sportsmanship and fair play. Early in his amateur career, he was in the final round of the 1925 U.S. Open at the Worcester Country Club. During the match, his ball ended up in the rough just off the fairway, and as he was setting up to play his shot, his iron caused a slight movement of the ball. He immediately got angry with himself, turned to the marshals, and called a penalty on himself. The marshals discussed among themselves and questioned some of the gallery whether they had seen Jones’s ball move. Their decision was that neither they nor anyone else had witnessed any incident, so the decision was left to Jones. Bobby Jones called the two-stroke penalty on himself, not knowing that he would lose the tournament by one stroke. When he was praised for his gesture, Jones replied,

“You may as well praise a man for not robbing a bank.”  

Wikipedia Page:  Bobby Jones

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, June 13, 2020 – Walter Hagen

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“You’re only here for a short visit. Don’t hurry, don’t worry. And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”

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“There is no tragedy in missing a putt, no matter how short. All have erred in this respect.”

And

“Make the hard ones look easy and the easy ones look hard.”

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“You don’t have the game you played last year or last week. You only have today’s game. It may be far from your best, but that’s all you’ve got. Harden your heart and make the best of it.”

And

“No one remembers who came in second.”

Wikipedia: Walter Hagen

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, June 12, 2020 – Billie Jean King

BillieJeanKing877

“A champion is afraid of losing. Everyone else is afraid of winning.”

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“Be bold. If you’re going to make an error, make a doozy, and don’t be afraid to hit the ball.”

And

“Champions keep playing until they get it right.”

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“I didn’t really care if I had a coach that much, me personally, because I was brought up to think for myself.”

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“I have a lot to say, and if I’m not No. 1, I can’t say it.”

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“I like entrepreneurial people; I like people who take risks.”

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“I think self-awareness is probably the most important thing towards being a champion.”

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“I will tell you King’s First Law of Recognition: You never get it when you want it, and then when it comes, you get too much.”

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“No one changes the world who isn’t obsessed.”

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“Sports teaches you character, it teaches you to play by the rules, it teaches you to know what it feels like to win and lose-it teaches you about life.”

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“The main thing is to care. Care very hard, even if it is only a game you are playing.”

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“Victory is fleeting. Losing is forever.”

Wikipedia:  Billie Jean King

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, June 11, 2020 – Hayden Fry

HaydenFry271888

“I learned a great many things in the Marines that helped me as a football coach.  The Marines train men hard and to do things the right way, just as a football team must train.”

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“In football, like in life, you must learn to play within the rules of the game.”

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“We probably spend more time talking about individual players in our coaching sessions than anything else.”

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“You can’t control people.  You must understand them.  You have to know where they’re coming from, their beliefs and values, what turns them off, what they’re against.”

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“I’ve felt sorry for young people who didn’t have an opportunity to play football, because I know what the game can offer.”

Wikipedia Page:  Hayden Fry

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 8, 2020 – Joseph Campbell

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“A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.”

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“Find a place inside where there’s joy, and the joy will burn out the pain.”

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“Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.”

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“I don’t believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.”

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“Is the system going to flatten you out and deny you your humanity, or are you going to be able to make use of the system to the attainment of human purposes?”

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“It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life. Where you stumble, there lies your treasure.”

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“Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning.”

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“Opportunities to find deeper powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging.”

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“The big question is whether you are going to be able to say a hearty yes to your adventure.”

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“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature.”

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“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.”

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“We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us.”

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“When we quit thinking primarily about ourselves and our own self-preservation, we undergo a truly heroic transformation of consciousness.”

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“When you make the sacrifice in marriage, you’re sacrificing not to each other but to unity in a relationship.”

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“Your life is the fruit of your own doing. You have no one to blame but yourself.”

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“Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.”

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“It’s only when a man tames his own demons that he becomes the king of himself if not of the world.”

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“The achievement of the hero is one that he is ready for and it’s really a manifestation of his character.”

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“People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonance within our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive. That’s what it’s all finally about.”

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“One thing that comes out in myths is that at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light.”

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“The way to find out about your happiness is to keep your mind on those moments when you feel most happy, when you really are happy-not excited, not just thrilled, but deeply happy. This requires a little bit of self analysis. What is it that makes you happy? Stay with it, no matter what people tell you. This is what I call “following your bliss.”

And

“The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read, not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man. …Tragedy is the shattering of the forms and of our attachment to the forms… the two are the terms of a single mythological theme… the down-going and the up-coming (kathados and anodos), which together constitute the totality of the revelation that is life, and which the individual must know and love if he is to be purged (katharsis=purgatorio) of the contagion of sin (disobedience to the divine will) and death (identification with the mortal form). “All things are changing; nothing dies…”

And

“Eternity isn’t some later time. Eternity isn’t a long time. Eternity has nothing to do with time. Eternity is that dimension of here and now which thinking and time cuts out. This is it. And if you don’t get it here, you won’t get it anywhere. And the experience of eternity right here and now is the function of life. There’s a wonderful formula that the Buddhists have for the Bodhisattva, the one whose being (sattva) is illumination (bodhi), who realizes his identity with eternity and at the same time his participation in time. And the attitude is not to withdraw from the world when you realize how horrible it is, but to realize that this horror is simply the foreground of a wonder and to come back and participate in it. “All life is sorrowful” is the first Buddhist saying, and it is. It wouldn’t be life if there were not temporality involved which is sorrow. Loss, loss, loss.”

And

“Follow your bliss.”

And

“Bill Moyers: Unlike heroes such as Prometheus or Jesus, we’re not going on our journey to save the world but to save ourselves.
Joseph Campbell: But in doing that you save the world. The influence of a vital person vitalizes, there’s no doubt about it. The world without spirit is a wasteland. People have the notion of saving the world by shifting things around, changing the rules, and who’s on top, and so forth. No, no! Any world is a valid world if it’s alive. The thing to do is to bring life to it, and the only way to do that is to find in your own case where the life is and become alive yourself.”

And

“Marx teaches us to blame society for our frailties, Freud teaches us to blame our parents, and astrology teaches us to blame the universe. The only place to look for blame is within: you didn’t have the guts to bring up your full moon and live the life that was your potential.”

Wikipedia:  Joseph Campbell

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, June 7, 2020 – Joe Louis

“Every man’s got to figure to get beat sometime.”

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“Once that bell rings you’re on your own. It’s just you and the other guy.”

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“I made the most of my ability and I did my best with my title.”

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“I hope they’re still making women like my momma. She always told me to do the right thing. She always told me to have pride in myself; she said a good name is better than money.”

And

“He can run, but he can’t hide.”

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“There is no such thing as a natural boxer. A natural dancer has to practice hard. A natural painter has to paint all the time. Even a natural fool has to work at it.”

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“Your job helps your family, and your family is forever.”

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“You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”

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“Yeah, I’m scared. I’m scared I might kill Schmeling.”

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“I just give lip service to being the greatest. He was the greatest.” – Muhammad Ali

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“(I define fear as) standing across the ring from Joe Louis and knowing he wants to go home early.” – Max Baer

And

“As soon as the bell rang, they folded like tulips.” – Ray Arcel, on Louis’ opponents

And

“He’s a credit to his race—the human race.” – Jimmy Cannon

And

“Louis is to good to be true and he is absolutely true.” – Ernest Hemingway

Wikipedia:  Joe Louis

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, June 6, 2020 – Omar Bradley

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“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

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“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

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“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

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“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

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“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

And

“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

And

“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

And

“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

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“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

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Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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