Coaches Hot Seat Blog

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, January 7, 2021 – John Adams

“A desire to be observed, considered, esteemed, praised, beloved, and admired by his fellows is one of the earliest as well as the keenest dispositions discovered in the heart of man.”

And

“A government of laws, and not of men.”

And

“All the perplexities, confusion and distress in America arise, not from defects in their Constitution or Confederation, not from want of honor or virtue, so much as from the downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit and circulation.”

And

“Because power corrupts, society’s demands for moral authority and character increase as the importance of the position increases.”

And

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”

And

“Great is the guilt of an unnecessary war.”

And

“I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in providence, for the illumination of the ignorant and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.”

And

“I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.”

And

“If we do not lay out ourselves in the service of mankind whom should we serve?”

And

“Let us tenderly and kindly cherish, therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write.”

And

“Liberty cannot be preserved without general knowledge among the people.”

And

“Old minds are like old horses; you must exercise them if you wish to keep them in working order.”

And

“Power always thinks… that it is doing God’s service when it is violating all his laws.”

And

“There are two educations. One should teach us how to make a living and the other how to live.”

And

“Tis impossible to judge with much Præcision of the true Motives and Qualities of human Actions, or of the Propriety of Rules contrived to govern them, without considering with like Attention, all the Passions, Appetites, Affections in Nature from which they flow. An intimate Knowledge therefore of the intellectual and moral World is the sole foundation on which a stable structure of Knowledge can be erected.”

And

“There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.”

And

“Yesterday the greatest question was decided which ever was debated in America; and a greater perhaps never was, nor will be, decided among men. A resolution was passed without one dissenting colony, “that these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States.”

And

“There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.”

And

“The consequences arising from the continual accumulation of public debts in other countries ought to admonish us to be careful to prevent their growth in our own.”

And

“Our obligations to our country never cease but with our lives.”

And

“As to the history of the revolution, my ideas may be peculiar, perhaps singular. What do we mean by the Revolution? The war? That was no part of the revolution; it was only an effect and consequence of it. The revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected from 1760–1775, in the course of fifteen years, before a drop of blood was shed at Lexington.”

And

“Power always sincerely, conscientiously, de très bon foi, believes itself right. Power always thinks it has a great soul and vast views, beyond the comprehension of the weak.”

And

“Let the human mind loose. It must be loose. It will be loose. Superstition and dogmatism cannot confine it.”

And

“This is the most magnificent movement of all! There is a dignity, a majesty, a sublimity, in this last effort of the patriots that I greatly admire. The people should never rise without doing something to be remembered — something notable and striking. This destruction of the tea is so bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible, and it must have so important consequences, and so lasting, that I can’t but consider it as an epocha in history!”
On the Boston Tea Party (17 December 1773)

And

“Children should be educated and instructed in the principles of freedom.”

And

Posterity! you will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom! I hope you will make a good use of it.” John Adams, Letters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife

Wikipedia: John Adams

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, January 6, 2021 – Benjamin Franklin

Remarks of Benjamin Franklin after the signing of the US Constitution on September 17, 1787 in the words of James Madison:

“Whilst the last members were signing it Doctor Franklin looking towards the Presidents Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that Painters had found it difficult to distinguish in their art a rising from a setting sun. I have, said he, often and often in the course of the Session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting: But now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting Sun.

And

“All mankind is divided into three classes: those that are immovable, those that are movable, and those that move.”

And

“Do not fear mistakes.  You will know failure.  Continue to reach out.”

And

“Do not squander time for that is the stuff life is made of.”

And

“Hide not your talents.  They for use were made.  What’s a sundial in the shade?”

And

“Tell me and I forget.  Teach me and I remember.  Involve me and I learn.”

And

“The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness.  You have to catch it yourself.”

And

“A great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges.”

And

“Be at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let every new year find you a better man.”

And

“Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn.”

And

“Energy and persistence conquer all things.”

And

“How few there are who have courage enough to own their faults, or resolution enough to mend them.”

And

“It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.”

And

“We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.”

And

“When you’re finished changing, you’re finished.”

And

“Where liberty is, there is my country.”

And

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.”

And

“I believe there is one Supreme most perfect being. … I believe He is pleased and delights in the happiness of those He has created; and since without virtue man can have no happiness in this world, I firmly believe He delights to see me virtuous.”

And

“I think opinions should be judged of by their influences and effects, and if a man holds none that tend to make him less virtuous or more vicious, it may be concluded that he holds none that are dangerous; which I hope is the case with me.”

And

“Love your Enemies, for they tell you your Faults.”

And

“I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

And

“They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

And

“Let me add, that only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”

And

“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

And

“These Names of Virtues with their Precepts were
1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to Dulness. Drink not to Elevation.
2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or your self. Avoid trifling Conversation.
3. ORDER. Let all your Things have their Places. Let each part of your Business have its Time.
4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve.
5. FRUGALITY. Make no Expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e. Waste nothing.
6. INDUSTRY. Lose no Time. Be always employ’d in something useful. Cut off all unnecessary actions.
7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful Deceit. Think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
8. JUSTICE. Wrong none, by doing Injuries or omitting the Benefits that are your Duty.
9. MODERATION. Avoid Extremes. Forbear resenting Injuries so much as you think they deserve.
10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no Uncleanliness in Body, Clothes, or Habitation.
11. TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at Trifles, or at Accidents common or unavoidable.
12. CHASTITY. Rarely use Venery but for Health or Offspring; Never to Dulness, Weakness, or the Injury of your own or another’s Peace or Reputation.
13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.”

Wikipedia Page:  Benjamin Franklin

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, January 5, 2021 – George Washington

“The power under the Constitution will always be in the people. It is entrusted for certain defined purposes, and for a certain limited period, to representatives of their own choosing; and whenever it is executed contrary to their interest, or not agreeable to their wishes, their servants can, and undoubtedly will, be recalled.”

And

“A slender acquaintance with the world must convince every man that actions, not words, are the true criterion of the attachment of friends.”

And

“Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.”

And

“Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence.”

And

“Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable; procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.”

And

“Experience teaches us that it is much easier to prevent an enemy from posting themselves than it is to dislodge them after they have got possession.”

And

“Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”

And

“Happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected.”

And

“I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man.”

And

“If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”

And

“It may be laid down as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a Free Government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal services to the defense of it.”

And

“Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.”

And

“Nothing can be more hurtful to the service, than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army the superiority over another.”

And

“To be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace.”

And

“Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light.”

And

“War – An act of violence whose object is to constrain the enemy, to accomplish our will.”

And

“Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.”

And

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or die.” George Washington, Address to the Continental Army before the Battle of Long Island, 27 August 1776

And

“Nothing is a greater stranger to my breast, or a sin that my soul more abhors, than that black and detestable one, ingratitude.”

And

“There is a Destiny which has the control of our actions, not to be resisted by the strongest efforts of Human Nature.”

And

“The only stipulations I shall contend for are, that in all things you shall do as you please. I will do the same; and that no ceremony may be used or any restraint be imposed on any one.”

And

“Rise early, that by habit it may become familiar, agreeable, healthy, and profitable. It may, for a while, be irksome to do this, but that will wear off; and the practice will produce a rich harvest forever thereafter; whether in public or private walks of life.”

And

“The Citizens of the United States of America have a right to applaud themselves for giving to Mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy: a policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.”

And

“A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined; to which end a uniform and well-digested plan is requisite; and their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories as tend to render them independent of others for essential, particularly military, supplies.”

And

“We have abundant reason to rejoice, that, in this land, the light of truth and reason has triumphed over the power of bigotry and superstition, and that every person may here worship God according to the dictates of his own heart. In this enlightened age, & in this land of equal liberty, it is our boast, that a man’s religious tenets will not forfeit the protection of the laws, nor deprive him of the right of attaining & holding the highest offices that are known in the United States.”

Wikipedia:  George Washington

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, January 4, 2021 – Abraham Lincoln

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

And

“All my life I have tried to pluck a thistle and plant a flower wherever the flower would grow in thought and mind.”

And

“Allow the president to invade a neighboring nation, whenever he shall deem it necessary to repel an invasion, and you allow him to do so whenever he may choose to say he deems it necessary for such a purpose – and you allow him to make war at pleasure.”

And

“Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any other.”

And

“America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.”

And

“Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up, and shake off the existing government, and form a new one that suits them better. This is a most valuable – a most sacred right – a right, which we hope and believe, is to liberate the world.”

And

“As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy.”

And

“Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.”

And

“Books serve to show a man that those original thoughts of his aren’t very new at all.”

And

“Character is like a tree and reputation like a shadow. The shadow is what we think of it; the tree is the real thing.”

And

“Every man is said to have his peculiar ambition. Whether it be true or not, I can say for one that I have no other so great as that of being truly esteemed of my fellow men, by rendering myself worthy of their esteem.”

And

“Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.”

And

“I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts.”

And

“I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live by the light that I have. I must stand with anybody that stands right, and stand with him while he is right, and part with him when he goes wrong.”

And

“I desire so to conduct the affairs of this administration that if at the end… I have lost every other friend on earth, I shall at least have one friend left, and that friend shall be down inside of me.”

And

“I do the very best I know how – the very best I can; and I mean to keep on doing so until the end.”

And

“I never had a policy; I have just tried to do my very best each and every day.”

And

“I was losing interest in politics, when the repeal of the Missouri Compromise aroused me again. What I have done since then is pretty well known.”

And

“I will prepare and some day my chance will come.”

And

“If there is anything that a man can do well, I say let him do it. Give him a chance.”

And

“In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.”

And

“It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one’s mouth and remove all doubt.”

And

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”

And

“Surely God would not have created such a being as man, with an ability to grasp the infinite, to exist only for a day! No, no, man was made for immortality.”

And

“The assertion that “all men are created equal” was of no practical use in effecting our separation from Great Britain and it was placed in the Declaration not for that, but for future use.”

And

“These capitalists generally act harmoniously and in concert, to fleece the people.”

And

“Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”

And

“You cannot build character and courage by taking away a man’s initiative and independence.”

And

“Determine that the thing can and shall be done, and then we shall find the way.”

And

“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it.”

And

“The dogmas of the quiet past, are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew. We must disenthrall our selves, and then we shall save our country. Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. We of this Congress and this administration, will be remembered in spite of ourselves. No personal significance, or insignificance, can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass, will light us down, in honor or dishonor, to the latest generation.” Second State of the Union Address, December 1, 1862

And

“At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? By what means shall we fortify against it? — Shall we expect some transatlantic military giant, to step the Ocean, and crush us at a blow? Never! — All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Buonaparte for a commander, could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio, or make a track on the Blue Ridge, in a trial of a thousand years.

At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide.” Lycecum Address, 1838

And

“Slavery is founded in the selfishness of man’s nature — opposition to it, in his love of justice. These principles are an eternal antagonism; and when brought into collision so fiercely, as slavery extension brings them, shocks, and throes, and convulsions must ceaselessly follow. Repeal the Missouri Compromise — repeal all compromises — repeal the Declaration of Independence — repeal all past history, you still can not repeal human nature. It still will be the abundance of man’s heart, that slavery extension is wrong; and out of the abundance of his heart, his mouth will continue to speak.”

And

“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

The Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863

And

Lincoln’s War, The Untold Story of American’s Greatest President as Commander in Chief by Geoffrey Perret

Here is a great excerpt from that book that happened just after the First Battle of Bull Run, August 1861:

“Dozens of regiments had set up impromptu around Fort Corcoran, on Arlington Heights. Every day these canvas congeries trembled like leaves in the wind as fresh rumors of an impending Confederate attack. And every day Lincoln heard fresh stories of demoralized troops, mutinous regiments, poor discipline. Some regiments were entitled to – and clamoring for – an immediate discharge, their ninety-day service complete. The War Department’s officers seemed to busy for the burdensome task of mustering them out. Unchecked, however, mutinous sentiments could spread through camps like a virulent disease.

Lincoln decided to see for himself, and Seward went with him. A few days after Bull Run, they rode across the Potomac in an open carriage on an impromptu visit to the troops. What greeted them was redoubts spreading across the landscape, tents sprouting like mushrooms in nearly every direction, dusty roads, a cross-hatching of cart tracks, men milling or lolling about, few signs of order or purpose. Yet the District, on edge for its safety, has more than enough men to defend it – if the men chose.

As the carriage rattled along towards Fort Corcoran, a red-bearded colonel strode up: William Tecumseh Sherman. He had commanded a brigade at Bull Run, superbly. Sherman asked if the President had come to see the troops. “Yes,” said Lincoln. “We heard that you had got over the big scare and we thought we would come over and see the boys.”

Sherman got into the carriage, giving the driver directions to a camp at the top of a small hill. Sitting next to Lincoln, he asked if the President intended to speak to the men. “I would like to,” said Lincoln.

Sherman said he no objection to that, but he did not want cheering, “No hurrahing, no humbug. We had enough of it before Bull Run to spoil any set of them.” None worse than the 69 th New York, filled with Irishmen angry at not being discharged. Sherman had rebuked one of the officers of lax discipline.

Standing in the carriage, Lincoln gave an impromptu talk to Sherman’s troops: bravery, sacrifice, gratitude, a glorious future. The men began to cheer, but he held up his hand. “Don’t cheer boys, I confess I rather like it myself, but Colonel Sherman says it is not military, and I guess we had better defer to his opinion.”

Closing his impromptu peroration, Lincoln said that as Commander in Chief, he was determined that every man should be treated exactly as the law required: his indirect promise that those entitled to a discharge would soon have one. As the carriage moved on, a young officer ran after it, calling out piteously, “Mr. Lincoln! Mr. Lincoln!”

Lincoln ordered the driver to stop. Here was the officer of the 69 th New York whom Sherman had criticized, panting hard. “Mr. President, I have a cause of grievance. This morning I went to speak to Colonel Sherman, and he threatened to shoot me.”

“I told him Mr. President, that if he refused to obey my order, I would shoot him on the spot,” said Sherman. “And I here repeat it, sir, that if I remain in command here, and he or any other man refuses to obey my orders, I’ll shoot him on the spot.”

Lincoln bent forward. “My lad, if I were you, and he threatened to shoot, I would not trust him, for I believe he would do it!” The troops, until then sympathetic to the officer, howled with laughter.

Both Seward and Lincoln were impressed by the comparative tidiness of the camps of Sherman’s regiments. “This is the first bright moment I’ve experienced since the battle,” Lincoln told Sherman before riding off. From his own military experience, he knew that neatness and cleanliness is an army spelled discipline; neglect was a signal of trouble to come.”

End of excerpt from Lincoln’s War

Wikipedia: Abraham Lincoln

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, January 3, 2021 – Barbara Jordan

“But this is the great danger America faces. That we will cease to be one nation and become instead a collection of interest groups: city against suburb, region against region, individual against individual. Each seeking to satisfy private wants.”

And

“Do not call for black power or green power. Call for brain power.”

And

“Education remains the key to both economic and political empowerment.”

And

“For all of its uncertainty, we cannot flee the future.”

And

“I felt somehow for many years that George Washington and Alexander Hamilton just left me out by mistake. But through the process of amendment, interpretation, and court decision, I have finally been included in “We, the people.”

And

“I never intended to become a run-of-the-mill person.”

And

“If we promise as public officials, we must deliver. If we as public officials propose, we must produce.”

And

“If you’re going to play the game properly, you’d better know every rule.”

And

“Let each person do his or her part. If one citizen is unwilling to participate, all of us are going to suffer. For the American idea, though it is shared by all of us, is realized in each one of us.”

And

“Let us heed the voice of the people and recognize their common sense. If we do not, we not only blaspheme our political heritage, we ignore the common ties that bind all Americans.”

And

“More is required of public officials than slogans and handshakes and press releases. More is required. We must hold ourselves strictly accountable. We must provide the people with a vision of the future.”

And

“The citizens of America expect more. They deserve and they want more than a recital of problems.”

And

“There is no executive order; there is no law that can require the American people to form a national community. This we must do as individuals and if we do it as individuals, there is no President of the United States who can veto that decision.”

And

“There is no obstacle in the path of young people who are poor or members of minority groups that hard work and preparation cannot cure.”

And

“We are a people trying not only to solve the problems of the present: unemployment, inflation… but we are attempting on a larger scale to fulfill the promise of America.”

And

“We call ourselves public servants but I’ll tell you this: we as public servants must set an example for the rest of the nation. It is hypocritical for the public official to admonish and exhort the people to uphold the common good.”

And

“We must exchange the philosophy of excuse – what I am is beyond my control for the philosophy of responsibility.”

And

“What the people want is very simple – they want an America as good as its promise.”

And

“What we have to do is strike a balance between the idea that government should do everything and the idea, the belief, that government ought to do nothing. Strike a balance.”

Wikipedia:  Barbara Jordan

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, January 2, 2021 – Tom Landry

“A winner never stops trying.”

And

“Football is an incredible game. Sometimes it’s so incredible, it’s unbelievable.”

And

“I don’t believe in team motivation. I believe in getting a team prepared so it knows it will have the necessary confidence when it steps on a field and be prepared to play a good game.”

And

“I’ve learned that something constructive comes from every defeat.”

And

“If you are prepared, you will be confident, and will do the job.”

And

“Leadership is a matter of having people look at you and gain confidence, seeing how you react. If you’re in control, they’re in control.”

And

“Leadership is getting someone to do what they don’t want to do, to achieve what they want to achieve.”

And

“Right after the game, say as little as possible.”

And

“Setting a goal is not the main thing. It is deciding how you will go about achieving it and staying with that plan.”

And

“The secret to winning is constant, consistent management.”

And

“Today, you have 100% of your life left.”

And

“When you want to win a game, you have to teach. When you lose a game, you have to learn.”

Wikipedia:  Tom Landry

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, January 1, 2021 – Paul “Bear” Bryant

“Mama wanted me to be a preacher. I told her coachin’ and preachin’ were a lot alike.”

And

“But it’s still a coach’s game. Make no mistake. You start at the top. If you don’t have a good one at the top, you don’t have a cut dog’s chance. If you do, the rest falls into place. You have to have good assistants, and a lot of things, but first you have to have the chairman of the board.”

And

“If anything goes bad, I did it. If anything goes semi-good, we did it. If anything goes really good, then you did it. That’s all it takes to get people to win football games for you.”

And

“I think the most important thing of all for any team is a winning attitude. The coaches must have it. The players must have it. The student body must have it. If you have dedicated players who believe in themselves, you don’t need a lot of talent.”

And

“The idea of molding men means a lot to me.”

And

“You must learn how to hold a team together. You must lift some men up, calm others down, until finally they’ve got one heartbeat. Then you’ve got yourself a team.”

And

“If wanting to win is a fault, as some of my critics seem to insist, then I plead guilty. I like to win. I know no other way. It’s in my blood.”

And

“Get the winners into the game.”

And

“The old lessons (work, self-discipline, sacrifice, teamwork, fighting to achieve) aren’t being taught by many people other than football coaches these days. The football coach has a captive audience and can teach these lessons because the communication lines between himself and his players are more wide open than between kids and parents. We better teach these lessons or else the country’s future population will be made up of a majority of crooks, drug addicts, or people on relief.”

And

“Sacrifice. Work. Self-discipline. I teach these things, and my boys don’t forget them when they leave.”

And

“It’s not the will to win that matters – everyone has that. It’s the will to prepare to win that matters.”

And

“I’ll never give up on a player regardless of his ability as long as he never gives up on himself. In time he will develop.”

And

“Set goals – high goals for you and your organization. When your organization has a goal to shoot for, you create teamwork, people working for a common good.”

And

“Don’t talk too much. Don’t pop off. Don’t talk after the game until you cool off.”

And

“You have to learn what makes this or that Sammy run. For one it’s a pat on the back, for another it’s eating him out, for still another it’s a fatherly talk, or something else. You’re a fool if you think as I did as a young coach, that you can treat them all alike.”

And

“If a man is a quitter, I’d rather find out in practice than in a game. I ask for all a player has so I’ll know later what I can expect.”

And

“Find your own picture, your own self in anything that goes bad. It’s awfully easy to mouth off at your staff or chew out players, but if it’s bad, and you’re the head coach, you’re responsible. If we have an intercepted pass, I threw it. I’m the head coach. If we get a punt blocked, I caused it. A bad practice, a bad game, it’s up to the head coach to assume his responsibility.”

And

“It’s awfully important to win with humility. It’s also important to lose with humility. I hate to lose worse than anyone, but if you never lose you won’t know how to act. If you lose with humility, then you can come back.”

And

“Losing doesn’t make me want to quit. It makes me want to fight that much harder.”

And

“The biggest mistake coaches make is taking borderline cases and trying to save them. I’m not talking about grades now, I’m talking about character. I want to know before a boy enrolls about his home life, and what his parents want him to be.”

And

“What are you doing here? Tell me why you are here. If you are not here to win a national championship, you’re in the wrong place. You boys are special. I don’t want my players to be like other students. I want special people. You can learn a lot on the football field that isn’t taught in the home, the church, or the classroom. There are going to be days when you think you’ve got no more to give and then you’re going to give plenty more. You are going to have pride and class. You are going to be very special. You are going to win the national championship for Alabama.”

And

“I’m no innovator. If anything I’m a stealer, or borrower. I’ve stolen or borrowed from more people than you can shake a stick at.”

And

“There is no sin in not liking to play; it’s a mistake for a boy to be there if he doesn’t want to.”

And

“I’m no miracle man. I guarantee nothing but hard work.”

And

“Don’t overwork your squad. If you’re going to make a mistake, under-work them.”

And

“Be aware of “yes” men. Generally, they are losers. Surround yourself with winners. Never forget – people win.”

And

“If there is one thing that has helped me as a coach, it’s my ability to recognize winners, or good people who can become winners by paying the price.”

And

“You take those little rascals, talk to them good, pat them on the back, let them think they are good, and they will go out and beat the biguns.”

And

“If you whoop and holler all the time, the players just get used to it.”

And

“I know what it takes to win. If I can sell them on what it takes to win, then we are not going to lose too many football games.”

And

“If you want to coach you have three rules to follow to win. One, surround yourself with people who can’t live without football. I’ve had a lot of them. Two, be able to recognize winners. They come in all forms. And, three, have a plan for everything. A plan for practice, a plan for the game. A plan for being ahead, and a plan for being behind 20-0 at half, with your quarterback hurt and the phones dead, with it raining cats and dogs and no rain gear because the equipment man left it at home.”

And

“My approach to the game has been the same at all the places I’ve been. Vanilla. The sure way. That means, first of all, to win physically. If you got eleven on a field, and they beat the other eleven physically, they’ll win. They will start forcing mistakes. They’ll win in the fourth quarter.”

And

“Little things make the difference. Everyone is well prepared in the big things, but only the winners perfect the little things.”

And

“Scout yourself. Have a buddy who coaches scout you.”

And

“The first time you quit, it’s hard. The second time, it gets easier. The third time, you don’t even have to think about it.”

And

“But there’s one thing about quitters you have to guard against – they are contagious. If one boy goes, the chances are he’ll take somebody with him, and you don’t want that. So when they would start acting that way, I used to pack them up and get them out, or embarrass them, or do something to turn them around.”

And

“There’s a lot of blood, sweat, and guts between dreams and success.”

And

“People who are in it for their own good are individualists. They don’t share the same heartbeat that makes a team so great. A great unit, whether it be football or any organization, shares the same heartbeat.”

And

“I told them my system was based on the “ant plan,” that I’d gotten the idea watching a colony of ants in Africa during the war. A whole bunch of ants working toward a common goal.”

And

“We can’t have two standards, one set for the dedicated young men who want to do something ambitious and one set for those who don’t.”

And

“I honestly believe that if you are willing to out-condition the opponent, have confidence in your ability, be more aggressive than your opponent and have a genuine desire for team victory, you will become the national champions. If you have all the above, you will acquire confidence and poise, and you will have those intangibles that win the close ones.”

And

“If you believe in yourself and have dedication and pride – and never quit – you’ll be a winner. The price of victory is high but so are the rewards.”

And

“Don’t ever give up on ability. Don’t give up on a player who has it.”

And

“A good, quick, small team can beat a big, slow team any time.”

And

“I have always tried to teach my players to be fighters. When I say that, I don’t mean put up your dukes and get in a fistfight over something. I’m talking about facing adversity in your life. There is not a person alive who isn’t going to have some awfully bad days in their lives. I tell my players that what I mean by fighting is when your house burns down, and your wife runs off with the drummer, and you’ve lost your job and all the odds are against you. What are you going to do? Most people just lay down and quit. Well, I want my people to fight back.”

And

“If they don’t have a winning attitude, I don’t want them.”

And

“I have tried to teach them to show class, to have pride, and to display character. I think football, winning games, takes care of itself if you do that.”

And

“I always want my players to show class, knock’em down, pat on the back, and run back to the huddle.”

And

“I tell young players who want to be coaches, who think they can put up with all the headaches and heartaches, can you live without it? If you can live without it, don’t get in it.”

Wikipedia:  Paul “Bear” Bryant

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, December 31, 2020 – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Character is higher than intellect.”

And

“I cannot find language of sufficient energy to convey my sense of the sacredness of private integrity.”

And

“A little integrity is better than any career. “

And

“Every industrious man, in every lawful calling, is a useful man. And one principal reason why men are so often useless is that they neglect their own profession or calling, and divide and shift their attention among a multiplicity of objects and pursuits.”

And

“What you do thunders so loudly in my ears I cannot hear what you say.”

And

“To finish the moment, to find the journey’s end in every step of the road, to live the greatest number of good hours, is wisdom.”

And

“We are always getting ready to live but never living.”

And

“None of us will ever accomplish anything excellent or commanding except when he listens to this whisper which is heard by him alone.”

And

“To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men that is genius. “

And

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

And

“Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood.”

And

“Whatever you do, you need courage. Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires some of the same courage that a soldier needs. Peace has its victories, but it takes brave men and women to win them.”

And

“The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.”

And

“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems in a useful life.”

And

“A chief event of life is the day in which we have encountered a mind that startled us.”

And

“A man is what he thinks about all day long.”

And

“As long as a man stands in his own way, everything seems to be in his way.”

And

“Character is higher than intellect. A great soul will be strong to live as well as think.”

And

“Enthusiasm is the mother of effort, and without it nothing great was ever achieved.”

And

“It was high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, ‘always do what you are afraid to do.”

And

“Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

And

“To be great is to be misunderstood.”

And

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”

And

“Trust men and they will be true to you; treat them greatly and they will show themselves great.”

And

“With the past, I have nothing to do; nor with the future. I live now.”

And

“If the colleges were better, if they … had the power of imparting valuable thought, creative principles, truths which become powers, thoughts which become talents, — if they could cause that a mind not profound should become profound, — we should all rush to their gates: instead of contriving inducements to draw students, you would need to set police at the gates to keep order in the in-rushing multitude.”

And

“Only the great generalizations survive. The sharp words of the Declaration of Independence, lampooned then and since as ‘glittering generalities,’ have turned out blazing ubiquities that will burn forever and ever.”

And

“To different minds, the same world is a hell, and a heaven.”

And

“Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis.”

And

“If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore, and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile.”

And

“The charming landscape which I saw this morning, is indubitably made up of some twenty or thirty farms. Miller owns this field, Locke that, and Manning the woodland beyond. But none of them owns the landscape. There is a property in the horizon which no man has but he whose eye can integrate all the parts, that is, the poet. This is the best part of these men’s farms, yet to this their warranty-deeds give no title. To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood. His intercourse with heaven and earth, becomes part of his daily food.”

And

“But genius looks forward: the eyes of men are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead: man hopes: genius creates.”

And

“There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better for worse as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but though his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till.”

And

“Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members. Society is a joint-stock company, in which the members agree, for the better securing of his bread to each shareholder, to surrender the liberty and culture of the eater. The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.”

And

“Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so.”

And

“Whoso would be a man, must be a nonconformist. He who would gather immortal palms must not be hindered by the name of goodness, but must explore if it be goodness. Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind. Absolve you to yourself, and you shall have the suffrage of the world.”

And

“Your genuine action will explain itself, and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothing. Act singly, and what you have already done singly will justify you now. Greatness appeals to the future. If I can be firm enough to-day to do right, and scorn eyes, I must have done so much right before as to defend me now. Be it how it will, do right now. Always scorn appearances, and you always may. The force of character is cumulative.”

And

“Hence, the less government we have, the better, — the fewer laws, and the less confided power. The antidote to this abuse of formal Government, is, the influence of private character, the growth of the Individual.”

And

“Money, which represents the prose of life, and which is hardly spoken of in parlors without an apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.”

And

“The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.”

Wikipedia:  Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, December 30, 2020 – John Wayne

“Courage is being scared to death… and saddling up anyway.”

And

“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

And

“Life is hard; it’s harder if you’re stupid.”

And

“If everything isn’t black and white, I say, ‘Why the hell not?'”

And

“I stick to simple themes. Love. Hate. No nuances. I stay away from psychoanalyst’s couch scenes. Couches are good for one thing.”

And

“A man’s got to do what a man’s got to do.”

And

“I’d like to know why well-educated idiots keep apologizing for lazy and complaining people who think the world owes them a living.”

And

“Sorry don’t get it done, Dude.” John T. Chance (Rio Bravo)

And

“A lot of guys make mistakes, I guess, but every one we make, a whole stack of chips goes with it. We make a mistake, and some guy don’t walk away – forevermore, he don’t walk away.” Sergeant John M. Stryker (Sands of Iwo Jima)

And

“Yup. The end of a way of life. Too bad. It’s a good way. Wagons forward! Yo!” Hondo Lane (Hondo)

And

“All battles are fought by scared men who’d rather be some place else.” Capt. Rockwell Torrey (In Harm’s Way)

And

“Republic. I like the sound of the word.” Col. David Crockett (The Alamo)

And

“I eat as much as I ever did, I drink more than I should, and my sex life is none of your goddamned business.” Playboy interview, May 1971

And

“I’ve always followed my father’s advice:  he told me, first to always keep my word and, second, to never insult anybody unintentionally.  If I insult you, you can be goddamn sure I intend to.  And, third, he told me not to go around looking for trouble.”

And

“A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by.”

And

“Don’t pick a fight, but if you find yourself in one I suggest you make damn sure you win.”

And

“I want to play a real man in all my films, and I define manhood simply:  men should be tough, fair, and courageous;  never petty, never looking for a fight, but never backing down from one either.”

And

“Words are what men live by….words they say and mean.”

Wikipedia:  John Wayne

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, December 29, 2020 – Nelson Mandela

“A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.”

And

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

And

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.”

And

“I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”

And

“It always seems impossible until its done.”

And

“Let freedom reign. The sun never set on so glorious a human achievement.”

And

“Money won’t create success, the freedom to make it will.”

And

“There is no passion to be found playing small – in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living.”

And

“There is nothing like returning to a place that remains unchanged to find the ways in which you yourself have altered.”

And

“We must use time wisely and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right.”

And

“I have walked that long road to freedom. I have tried not to falter; I have made missteps along the way. But I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not yet ended.”

And

“I stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant of you, the people. Your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. I therefore place the remaining years of my life in your hands.”

And

“No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”  Long Walk to Freedom

And

“The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”

And

“Only free men can negotiate; prisoners cannot enter into contracts. Your freedom and mine cannot be separated.” Refusing to bargain for freedom after 21 years in prison

And

“I stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant of you, the people. Your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. I therefore place the remaining years of my life in your hands.” Speech on the day of his release, Cape Town, February 11, 1990

And

“When a man is denied the right to live the life he believes in, he has no choice but to become an outlaw.”

And

“No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

And

“Education is the great engine of personal development. It is through education that the daughter of a peasant can become a doctor, that the son of a mineworker can become the head of the mine, that a child of farmworkers can become the president of a great nation. It is what we make out of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another.”

And

“A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.”

And

“I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”

And

“I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.”

And

“Gandhi himself never ruled out violence absolutely and unreservedly. He conceded the necessity of arms in certain situations. He said, “Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor …”

Wikipedia:  Nelson Mandela

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