Coaches Hot Seat Blog

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, April 1, 2021 – John Wayne

“Courage is being scared to death… and saddling up anyway.”

And

“Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

And

“Life is hard; it’s harder if you’re stupid.”

And

“If everything isn’t black and white, I say, ‘Why the hell not?'”

And

“I stick to simple themes. Love. Hate. No nuances. I stay away from psychoanalyst’s couch scenes. Couches are good for one thing.”

And

“A man’s got to do what a man’s got to do.”

And

“I’d like to know why well-educated idiots keep apologizing for lazy and complaining people who think the world owes them a living.”

And

“Sorry don’t get it done, Dude.” John T. Chance (Rio Bravo)

And

“A lot of guys make mistakes, I guess, but every one we make, a whole stack of chips goes with it. We make a mistake, and some guy don’t walk away – forevermore, he don’t walk away.” Sergeant John M. Stryker (Sands of Iwo Jima)

And

“Yup. The end of a way of life. Too bad. It’s a good way. Wagons forward! Yo!” Hondo Lane (Hondo)

And

“All battles are fought by scared men who’d rather be some place else.” Capt. Rockwell Torrey (In Harm’s Way)

And

“Republic. I like the sound of the word.” Col. David Crockett (The Alamo)

And

“I eat as much as I ever did, I drink more than I should, and my sex life is none of your goddamned business.” Playboy interview, May 1971

And

“I’ve always followed my father’s advice:  he told me, first to always keep my word and, second, to never insult anybody unintentionally.  If I insult you, you can be goddamn sure I intend to.  And, third, he told me not to go around looking for trouble.”

And

“A man’s got to have a code, a creed to live by.”

And

“Don’t pick a fight, but if you find yourself in one I suggest you make damn sure you win.”

And

“I want to play a real man in all my films, and I define manhood simply:  men should be tough, fair, and courageous;  never petty, never looking for a fight, but never backing down from one either.”

And

“Words are what men live by….words they say and mean.”

Wikipedia:  John Wayne

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, March 31, 2021 – Omar Bradley

“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

And

“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

And

“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

And

“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

And

“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

And

“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

And

“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

And

“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

And

“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

And

Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, March 30, 2021 – Tom Clancy

“America is the most inventive country in the world because everybody has access to information.”

And

“Fighting wars is not so much about killing people as it is about finding things out. The more you know, the more likely you are to win a battle.”

And

“I was one of the first generations to watch television. TV exposes people to news, to information, to knowledge, to entertainment. How is it bad?”

And

“I’ve made up stuff that’s turned out to be real, that’s the spooky part.”

And

“In the Soviet Union it was illegal to take a photograph of a train station. Look what happened to them. They tried to classify everything.”

And

“It’s not right to say that our loss in Vietnam turned out to be a gain. But lessons were learned. And they were the right lessons.”

And

“Life is about learning; when you stop learning, you die.”

And

“Man is a creature of hope and invention, both of which belie the idea that things cannot be changed.”

And

“No matter what you or anyone else does, there will be someone who says that there’s something bad about it.”

And

“Nothing is as real as a dream. The world can change around you, but your dream will not. Responsibilities need not erase it. Duties need not obscure it. Because the dream is within you, no one can take it away.”

And

“People live longer today than they ever have. They live happier lives, have more knowledge, more information. All this is the result of communications technology. How is any of that bad?”

And

“Probably what pushed the Russians over the edge was SDI. They realized they couldn’t beat us.”

And

“Show me an elitist, and I’ll show you a loser.”

And

“The control of information is something the elite always does, particularly in a despotic form of government. Information, knowledge, is power. If you can control information, you can control people.”

And

“The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense.”

And

“The good old days are now.”

And

“The human condition today is better than it’s ever been, and technology is one of the reasons for that.”

And

“The U.S. Military is us. There is no truer representation of a country than the people that it sends into the field to fight for it. The people who wear our uniform and carry our rifles into combat are our kids, and our job is to support them, because they’re protecting us.”

And

“There are two kinds of people: the ones who need to be told and the ones who figure it out all by themselves.”

And

“There used to be this country called the Soviet Union; it’s not there anymore. Our technology was better than theirs.”

And

“There was a time when nails were high-tech. There was a time when people had to be told how to use a telephone. Technology is just a tool. People use tools to improve their lives.”

And

“Whenever somebody comes up with a good idea, there’s somebody else who has never had a good idea in his life who stands up and says, Oh, you can’t do that.”

Wikipedia:  Tom Clancy

www.tomclancy.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, March 29, 2021 – Louis Armstrong

“What we play is life.”

And

“If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.”

And

“I never tried to prove nothing, just wanted to give a good show. My life has always been my music, it’s always come first, but the music ain’t worth nothing if you can’t lay it on the public. The main thing is to live for that audience, ’cause what you’re there for is to please the people.”

And

“My whole life, my whole soul, my whole spirit is to blow that horn…”

And

“We all do ‘do, re, mi,’ but you have got to find the other notes yourself.”

And

“There are some people that if they don’t know, you can’t tell them.”

And

“There is no such thing as ‘on the way out’ as long as you are still doing something interesting and good; you’re in the business because you’re breathing”

And

“All music is folk music, I ain’t never heard no horse sing a song”

And

“There is two kinds of music, the good, and the bad. I play the good kind.”

And

“He was the only musician who ever lived, who can’t be replaced by someone.” Bing Crosby on Louis Armstrong

And

“He was born poor, died rich, and never hurt anyone along the way.” Duke Ellington on Louis Armstrong

And

“If I don’t practice for a day, I know it. If I don’t practice for two days, the critics know it. And if I don’t practice for three days, the public knows it.”

And

“Some of you young folks been saying to me, “Hey Pops, what you mean ‘What a wonderful world’? How about all them wars all over the place? You call them wonderful? And how about hunger and pollution? That aint so wonderful either.” Well how about listening to old Pops for a minute. Seems to me, it aint the world that’s so bad but what we’re doin’ to it. And all I’m saying is, see, what a wonderful world it would be if only we’d give it a chance. Love baby, love. That’s the secret, yeah. If lots more of us loved each other, we’d solve lots more problems. And then this world would be better. That’s wha’ ol’ Pops keeps saying.” Spoken intro to “What a Wonderful World”

Wikipedia:  Louis Armstrong

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, March 28, 2021 – Jackie Robinson

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

And

“I’m not concerned with your liking or disliking me…  All I ask is that you respect me as a human being.”

And

“Life is not a spectator sport.  If you’re going to spend your whole life in the grandstand just watching what goes on, in my opinion you’re wasting your life.”

And

“It kills me to lose.  If I’m a troublemaker, and I don’t think that my temper makes me one, then it’s because I can’t stand losing.  That’s the way I am about winning, all I ever wanted to do was finish first.”

And

“Baseball is like a poker game.  Nobody wants to quit when he’s losing; nobody wants you to quit when you’re ahead.”

And

“The way I figured it, I was even with baseball and baseball with me.  The game had done much for me, and I had done much for it.”

And

“It was a small victory, for I had learned that I was in two wars, one against the foreign enemy, the other against prejudice at home.”
On his 1944 acquittal from a court-martial for refusing to go the back of a military bus upon boarding it near Fort Hood, TX on July 6, 1944

Wikipedia:  Jackie Robinson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, March 27, 2021 – Darrell Royal

“A boy shows how much he wants to play in the spring, when it’s tough, and during two a days, when it’s hot and tough. I don’t count on the boy who waits till October, when it’s cool and fun, then decides he wants to play. Maybe he’s better than three guys ahead of him, but I know those three won’t change their minds in the fourth quarter.”

And

“Breaks balance out. The sun don’t shine on the same ol’ dog’s rear end every day.”

And

“Football doesn’t build character. It eliminates the weak ones.”

And

“I learned this about coaching: You don’t have to explain victory and you can’t explain defeat.”

And

“Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.”

And

“Once you cross the 50 you feel like an unsaddled horse.”

And

“Punt returns will kill you quicker than a minnow can swim a dipper.”

And

“You know, a football coach is nothing more than a teacher. You teach them the same subject, and you have a group of new guys every year.”

And

“You’ve got to think lucky. If you fall into a mudhole, check your back pocket – you might have caught a fish.”

And

“You’ve got to be in a position for luck to happen. Luck doesn’t go around looking for a stumblebum.”

And

“On game day, I am more nervous than a pig in a packing plant.”

And

“There’s an old saying, ‘You dance with who brung ya.’”

And

“Really, it was said about two-thirds in jest. Since we won the Arkansas and Notre Dame games with fourth-down and short-yardage passes, another image has arisen. I’ve been pictured as a man who takes chances. Two stinkin’ plays, and I’m a helluva gambler.”

And

“Some of them are so green you could hide ‘em on top of a lettuce leaf.”

And

“He could run like small-town gossip.”

And

“Ol’ Ugly is better than Ol’ Nothing.”

And

“They’re gonna come after us with their eyes pulled up like BBs.”

And

“There was a hornet’s nest waiting for us in Houston, and we were walking into it like Little Red Riding Hood with jam on her face.”

And

“Winning coaches must treat mistakes like copperheads in the bedclothes – avoid them with all the energy you can muster.”

And

“The best thing a coach can hope for is to please the majority. And the only way to please the majority is to win.”

And

“I’m pretty thin-skinned. When they say, ‘Do you want some constructive criticism?’ I say, ‘No.’”

And

“It’s an in-the-trench battle. It’s meat on meat, flesh on flesh and stink on stink. And that’s the only way you can play it.”

And

“Trends are bunk. Only angry people win football games.”

And

“We don’t want candy stripes on our uniforms. These are work clothes.”

And

“He’s as quick as a hiccup.”

And

“He doesn’t have a lot of speed, but maybe Elizabeth Taylor can’t sing.”

And

“I didn’t want to stay until I had used up all the enjoyment because that’s too long to stay anywhere.”

And

“If worms carried pistols, birds wouldn’t eat ’em.”

Wikipedia: Darrell Royal

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, March 26, 2021 – Amelia Earhart

“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

And

“Better do a good deed near at home than go far away to burn incense.”

And

“Courage is the price that Life exacts for granting peace, The soul that knows it not, knows no release from little things.”

And

“Flying might not be all plain sailing, but the fun of it is worth the price.”

And

“I want to do it because I want to do it.”

And

“In soloing – as in other activities – it is far easier to start something than it is to finish it.”

And

“Never do things others can do and will do if there are things others cannot do or will not do.”

And

“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.”

And

“Obviously I faced the possibility of not returning when first I considered going. Once faced and settled there really wasn’t any good reason to refer to it.”

And

“Please know that I am aware of the hazards. I want to do it because I want to do it. Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail, their failure must be a challenge to others.”

And

“The more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one’s appreciation of fundamental things like home, and love, and understanding companionship.”

And

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward.”

And

“The most effective way to do it, is to do it.”

And

“The woman who can create her own job is the woman who will win fame and fortune.”

And

“There are two kinds of stones, as everyone knows, one of which rolls.”

And

“There is so much that must be done in a civilized barbarism like war.”

And

“Women must pay for everything. They do get more glory than men for comparable feats, but, they also get more notoriety when they crash.”

And

“Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail their failure must be but a challenge to others.”

And

“Women, like men, should try to do the impossible. And when they fail, their failure should be a challenge to others.”

And

“The more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one’s appreciation of fundamental things like home, and love, and understanding companionship.”

And

“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

And

“No kind action ever stops with itself. One kind action leads to another. Good example is followed. A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees. The greatest work that kindness does to others is that it makes them kind themselves.”

And

“In my life I had come to realize that when things were going very well indeed it was just the time to anticipate trouble. And, conversely, I learned from pleasant experience that at the most despairing crisis, when all looked sour beyond words, some delightful “break” was apt to lurk just around the corner.”

And

“The soul’s dominion? Each time we make a choice, we pay with courage to behold restless day and count it fair.”

And

“Anticipation, I suppose, sometimes exceeds realization.”

And

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward.”

And

“Worry retards reaction and makes clear-cut decisions impossible.”

And

“…decide…whether or not the goal is worth the risks involved. If it is, stop worrying….”

And

“Not much more than a month ago I was on the other shore of the Pacific, looking westward. This evening, I looked eastward over the Pacific. In those fast-moving days which have intervened, the whole width of the world has passed behind us -except this broad ocean. I shall be glad when we have the hazards of its navigation behind us.” — Amelia Earhart, several days before she left for Howland Island and disappeared

Wikipedia: Amelia Earhart

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Coaches Hot Seat Blog Quotes of the Day – Thursday, March 25, 2021 – Louis L’Amour

“A good beginning makes a good end.” 

And

“A wise man fights to win, but he is twice a fool who has no plan for possible defeat.”

And

“All loose things seem to drift down to the sea, and so did I.”

And

“Anger is a killing thing: it kills the man who angers, for each rage leaves him less than he had been before – it takes something from him.” 

And

“For one who reads, there is no limit to the number of lives that may be lived, for fiction, biography, and history offer an inexhaustible number of lives in many parts of the world, in all periods of time.”

And

“He might never really do what he said, but at least he had it in mind. He had somewhere to go.”

And

“Knowledge is like money: to be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.” 

And

“No memory is ever alone; it’s at the end of a trail of memories, a dozen trails that each have their own associations.”

And

“No one can get an education, for of necessity education is a continuing process.”

And

“Nobody got anywhere in the world by simply being content.”

And

“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. Yet that will be the beginning.”

And

“To disbelieve is easy; to scoff is simple; to have faith is harder.”

And

“To make democracy work, we must be a notion of participants, not simply observers. One who does not vote has no right to complain.”

And

“Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen.”

And

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”

And

“One day I was speeding along at the typewriter, and my daughter – who was a child at the time – asked me, “Daddy, why are you writing so fast?” And I replied, “Because I want to see how the story turns out!”

Wikipedia:  Louis L’Amour

www.louislamour.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, March 24, 2021 – Robert F. Kennedy

“There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask why… I dream of things that never were, and ask why not?”

And

“Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.”

And

“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.”

And

“Tragedy is a tool for the living to gain wisdom, not a guide by which to live.”

And

“All of us might wish at times that we lived in a more tranquil world, but we don’t. And if our times are difficult and perplexing, so are they challenging and filled with opportunity.”

And

“The problem of power is how to achieve its responsible use rather than its irresponsible and indulgent use — of how to get men of power to live for the public rather than off the public.”

And

“Every society gets the kind of criminal it deserves. What is equally true is that every community gets the kind of law enforcement it insists on.”

And

“A revolution is coming — a revolution which will be peaceful if we are wise enough; compassionate if we care enough; successful if we are fortunate enough — But a revolution which is coming whether we will it or not. We can affect its character; we cannot alter its inevitability.”

And

“Few will have the greatness to bend history itself; but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation.”

And

“Every dictatorship has ultimately strangled in the web of repression it wove for its people, making mistakes that could not be corrected because criticism was prohibited.”

And

Something about the fact that I made some contribution to either my country, or those who were less well off. I think back to what Camus wrote about the fact that “perhaps this world is a world in which children suffer, but we can lessen the number of suffering children, and if you do not do this, then who will do this? I’d like to feel that I’d done something to lessen that suffering.”

And

“Some men see things as they are and say, ‘Why’? I dream of things that never were and say, ‘Why not’?” Robert Kennedy made this quotation famous during his 1968 Presidential campaign. Although he apparently used it on several occasions as a kind of slogan, the only occasion for which we have been able to find documentation is his speech at the University of Kansas on March 18, 1968. In its original form, the quotation was said by the serpent in George Bernard Shaw’s play Back to Methuselah , and was used by President Kennedy in his Speech to the Irish Parliament on June 28, 1963: “Speaking as an Irishman [Shaw] summed up an approach to life: ‘Other people,’ he said, ‘see things and say: why – but I dream things that never were and say: why not.'”

And

“On this generation of Americans falls the burden of proving to the world that we really mean it when we say all men are created free and are equal before the law. All of us might wish at times that we lived in a more tranquil world, but we don’t. And if our times are difficult and perplexing, so are they challenging and filled with opportunity.” Speech, Law Day Exercises of the University of Georgia Law School, May 6, 1961.

And

“The future is not a gift: it is an achievement. Every generation helps make its own future. This is the essential challenge of the present.” Address, Seattle World’s Fair, August 7, 1962.

And

“Since the days of Greece and Rome when the word ‘citizen’ was a title of honor, we have often seen more emphasis put on the rights of citizenship than on its responsibilities. And today, as never before in the free world, responsibility is the greatest right of citizenship and service is the greatest of freedom’s privileges.” Speech, University of San Francisco Law School, San Francisco, California, September 29, 1962.

And

“I believe that, as long as there is plenty, poverty is evil.” Speech, Athens, Georgia, May 6, 1961.”All great questions must be raised by great voices, and the greatest voice is the voice of the people – speaking out – in prose, or painting or poetry or music; speaking out – in homes and halls, streets and farms, courts and cafes – let that voice speak and the stillness you hear will be the gratitude of mankind.” Address, New York City, January 22, 1963.

And

“When he shall die take him and cut him out into stars and he shall make the face of heaven so fine that all the world will be in love with night and pay no worship to the garish sun.” Quoting Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet at the Democratic National Convention, 8/27/64.

And

“President Kennedy’s favorite quote was really from Dante : ‘The hottest places in Hell are reserved for those who in time of moral crisis preserve their neutrality.'” Columbia University/Barnard Democratic Club, 10/5/64.

And

“And as long as America must choose, that long will there be a need and a place for the Democratic Party. We Democrats can run on our record but we cannot rest on it. We will win if we continue to take the initiative and if we carry the message of hope and action throughout the country. Alexander Smith once said, ‘A man doesn’t plant a tree for himself. He plants it for posterity.’ Let us continue to plant, and our children shall reap the harvest. That is our destiny as Democrats.” Testimonial Dinner for Lieutenant Governor Patrick J. Lucey of Wisconsin, August 15, 1965.

And

“Democracy is no easy form of government. Few nations have been able to sustain it. For it requires that we take the chances of freedom; that the liberating play of reason be brought to bear of events filled with passion; that dissent be allowed to make its appeal for acceptance; that men chance error in their search for the truth.” Statement on Vietnam, February 19, 1966.

And

“Only those who dare to fail greatly, can ever achieve greatly.” Day of Affirmation Address, University of Capetown, South Africa, June 6, 1966.

And

“We must recognize the full human equality of all our people – before God, before the law, and in the councils of government. We must do this not because it is economically advantageous – although it is; not because the laws of God and man command it – although they do command it; not because people in other lands wish it so. We must do it for the single and fundamental reason that it is the right thing to do.” Day of Affirmation Address, University of Capetown, South African, June 6, 1966.

And

“Nations, like men, often march to the beat of different drummers, and the precise solutions of the United States can neither be dictated nor transplanted to others. What is important is that all nations must march toward a increasing freedom; toward justice for all; toward a society strong and flexible enough to meet the demands of all of its own people, and a world of immense and dizzying change.” Day of Affirmation Address, University of Capetown, South African, June 6, 1966.

And

“This world demands the qualities of youth: not a time of life but a state of mind, a temper of the will, a quality of imagination, a predominance of courage over timidity, of the appetite for adventure over the life of ease.” Day of Affirmation Address, University of Capetown, South Africa, June 6, 1966.

And

“Few will have the greatness to bend history; but each of us can work to change a small portion of the events, and in the total of all these acts will be written the history of this generation…It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is thus shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.” Day of Affirmation Address, University of Capetown, South Africa, June 6, 1966.

And

“The future does not belong to those who are content with today, apathetic toward common problems and their fellow man alike, timid and fearful in the face of bold projects and new ideas. Rather, it will belong to those who can blend passion, reason and courage in a personal commitment to the great enterprises and ideals of American society.” Address, University of California at Berkeley, October 22, 1966.

And

“The sharpest criticism often goes hand in hand with the deepest idealism and love of country.” Address, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 24, 1967.

And

“If we fail to dare, if we do not try, the next generation will harvest the fruit of our indifference; a world we did not want – a world we did not choose – but a world we could have made better, by caring more for the results of our labors. And we shall be left only with the hollow apology of T.S. Eliot: ‘That is not what I meant at all. That is not it, at all’.” 8/23/67, Americana Hotel, New York, N.Y.

And

“Perhaps we cannot prevent this world from being a world in which children are tortured. But we can reduce the number of tortured children. And if you don’t help us, who else in the world can help us do this?” From Albert Camus. Appears on the dedication page of Robert F. Kennedy’s last book, To Seek a Newer World (Doubleday, 1967).

And

“Too much and too long, we seem to have surrendered community excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our gross national product…if we should judge American by that – counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for those who break them. It counts the destruction of our redwoods and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl. It counts napalm and the cost of a nuclear warhead, and armored cars for police who fight riots in our streets. It counts Whitman’s rifle and Speck’s knife, and the television programs which glorify violence in order to sell toys to our children.

And

“Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education, or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages; the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage; neither our wisdom nor our learning; neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country; it measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile. And it tells us everything about America except why we are proud that we are Americans.” Address, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, March 18, 1968.

And

“I am glad to come to the University of Alabama. I’m delighted to see the inside of this building. I didn’t think it meant anything that they snuck me around the back way. They said someone was waiting out in front there.” March 21, 1968.

And

“Aeschylus wrote: In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until, in our despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God. What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence or lawlessness; but love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or they be black. Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of the world. Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.” Statement on the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Indianapolis, Indiana, April 4, 1968. Additional detail .

And

“What has violence ever accomplished? What has it ever created? No martyr’s cause has ever been stilled by an assassin’s bullet.
“No wrongs have ever been righted by riots and civil disorders. A sniper is only a coward, not a hero; and an uncontrolled, uncontrollable mob is only the voice of madness, not the voice of reason.

And

“Whenever any American’s life is taken by another American unnecessarily – whether it is done in the name of the law or in the defiance of the law, by one man or a gang, in cold blood or in passion, in an attack of violence or in response to violence – whenever we tear at the fabric of the life which another man has painfully and clumsily woven for himself and his children, the whole nation is degraded.” On the Mindless Menace of Violence, Cleveland, Ohio, April 5, 1968.

And

“I think we can end the divisions within the United States. What I think is quite clear is that we can work together in the last analysis. And that what has been going on with the United States over the period of that last three years, the divisions, the violence, the disenchantment with our society, the divisions- whether it’s between blacks and whites, between the poor and the more affluent, or between age groups, or in the war in Vietnam – that we can work together. We are a great country, and unselfish country and a compassionate country. And I intend to make that my basis for running.” California Victory Speech, Los Angeles, California, June 4, 1968.

Wikipedia:  Robert F. Kennedy

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, March 23, 2021 – Eddie Robinson

“Coaching is a profession of love. You can’t coach people unless you love them.”

And

“My players can wear their hair as long as they want and dress any way they want. That is, if they can afford to pay their own tuition, meals and board.”

And

“People talk about the record I’ve compiled at Grambling, but the real record is the fact that for over 50 years I’ve had one job and one wife. I don’t believe anybody can out-American me.”

And

“I’ve learned more about what the players meant to me and what they meant to the game. I never won a game – they did. You learn from every player because they’re not the same.”

And

“Everything I’ve done, I think I dreamed of it first.”

And

“The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential… these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence.”

And

“Coach each boy as if he were your own son”

And

“Leadership, like coaching, is fighting for the hearts and souls of men and getting them to believe in you”

And

“They call me the greatest. I know that the greatest football coach who ever stepped on the field is Coach Eddie Robinson. I have admired what he has done in turning boys into men. He is a credit to his sport as well as a credit to humanity.” Muhammad Ali

And

“First time I met Eddie was around 1968 up at Uniontown, Pa. I was an assistant coach at West Virginia, and he was the head coach at Grambling and very successful. He came up there and spoke at a banquet. I heard him speak, and he’s the kind of guy that you get close to immediately. … He was a people’s person. You can’t help but like him … I doubt if there is a coach in the United States that people have more respect for — and loved — than for Eddie Robinson.” Bobby Bowden

Eddie G. Robinson Museum

Wikipedia: Eddie Robinson

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