COACHES HOT SEAT

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, February 15, 2017 – Otis Redding

 

OtisRedding1818181

“If you want to be a singer, you’ve got to concentrate on it twenty-four hours a day. You can’t be a well driller, too. You’ve got to concentrate on the business of entertaining and writing songs. Always think different from the next person. Don’t ever do a song as you heard somebody else do it.”

And

“Sittin’ in the mornin’ sun,
I’ll be sittin’ in the evening come.
Watchin’ the ships roll in,
then I watch ’em roll away again.

Yeah, I’m sittin’ on the dock of the bay,
watching the tide roll away.
I’m jus’ sittin’ on the dock of the bay…
Wastin’ time
 
I left my home in georgia,
headed for the ‘frisco bay.
‘Cos I’ve had nothing to live for,
and looks like nothin’s gonna come my way.

So, I’m jus’ gonna sit on the dock of the bay,
watching the tide roll away.
I’m jus’ sittin’ on the dock of the bay…
Wastin’ time.”  Otis Redding

Wikipedia Page:  Otis Redding

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, February 14, 2017 – Norman Mailer

 

NormanMailer737322

“Every moment of one’s existence one is growing into more or retreating into less.  One is always living a little more or dying a little bit.”

And

“Growth, in some curious way, I suspect, depends on being always in motion just a little bit, one way or another.”

And

“I don’t think life is absurd. I think we are all here for a huge purpose.  I think we shrink from the immensity of the purpose we are here for.

And

“Masculinity is not something given to you, but something you gain.  And you gain it by winning small battles with honor.”

And

“There was that law of life, so cruel and so just, that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same.”

And

“Ultimately a hero is a man who would argue with the gods, and so awakens devils to contest his vision.  The more a man can achieve, the more he may be certain that the devil will inhabit a part of his creation.”

And

“Somerset Maugham … wrote somewhere that “Nobody is any better than he ought to be.”… I carried it along with me as a working philosophy, but I suppose that finally I would have to take exception to the thought … or else the universe is just an elaborate clock.” The Deer Park, 1955

And

“The final purpose of art is to intensify, even, if necessary, to exacerbate, the moral consciousness of people.”

And

“Writing books is the closest men ever come to childbearing.”

And

“With the pride of an artist, you must blow against the walls of every power that exists, the small trumpet of your defiance.”

And

“His consolation in those hours when he was most uncharitable to himself is that taken at his very worst he was at least still worthy of being a character in a novel by Balzac, win one day, lose the next, and do it with boom! and baroque in the style.”

And

“There is no greater importance in all the world like knowing you are right and that the wave of the world is wrong, yet the wave crashes upon you

And

“New York is one of the capitals of the world and Los Angeles is a constellation of plastic, San Francisco is a lady, Boston has become Urban Renewal, Philadelphia and Baltimore and Washington blink like dull diamonds in the smog of Eastern Megalopolis, and New Orleans is unremarkable past the French Quarter. Detroit is a one-trade town, Pittsburgh has lost its golden triangle, St Louis has become the golden arch of the corporation, and nights in Kansas City close early. The oil depletion allowance makes Houston and Dallas naught but checkerboards for this sort of game. But Chicago is a great American city. Perhaps it is the last of the great American cities.”

And

“There are four stages to marriage. First there’s the affair, then there’s the marriage, then children, and finally the fourth stage, without which you cannot know a woman, the divorce.”

And

“We think of Marilyn who was every man’s love affair with America. Marilyn Monroe who was blonde and beautiful and had a sweet little rinky-dink of a voice and all the cleanliness of all the clean American backyards.”

And

“The highest prize in a world of men is the most beautiful woman available on your arm and living there in her heart loyal to you.”

And

“We sail across dominions barely seen, washed by the swells of time. We plow through fields of magnetism. Past and future come together on thunderheads and our dead hearts live with lightning in the wounds of the Gods.”

And

“I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one’s virtue, or one’s courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.”

And

“Obsession is the single most wasteful human activity, because with an obsession you keep coming back and back and back to the same question and never get an answer.”

And

“Booze, pot, too much sex, failure in one’s private life, too much attrition, too much recognition, too little recognition. Nearly everything in the scheme of things works to dull a first-rate talent. But the worst probably is cowardice.”

And

“There was that law of life so cruel and so just which demanded that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same.”

And

“The sickness of our times for me has been just this damn thing that everything has been getting smaller and smaller and less and less important, that the romantic spirit has dried up, that there is no shame today…. We’re all getting so mean and small and petty and ridiculous, and we all live under the threat of extermination.”

And

“On a late-winter evening in 1983, while driving through fog along the Maine coast, recollections of old campfires began to drift into the March mist, and I thought of the Abnaki Indians of the Algonquin tribe who dwelt near Bangor a thousand years ago.”
Harry Hubbard, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“What if there are not only two nostrils, two eyes, two lobes, and so forth, but two psyches as well, and they are separately equipped? They go through life like Siamese twins inside one person…. They can be just a little different, like identical twins, or they can be vastly different, like good and evil.”
Kittredge Gardiner, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one’s virtue, or one’s courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.”
Harry Hubbard, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“Booze, pot, too much sex, failure in one’s private life, too much attrition, too much recognition, too little recognition. Nearly everything in the scheme of things works to dull a first-rate talent. But the worst probably is cowardice.”

And

“There is one expanding horror in American life. It is that our long odyssey toward liberty, democracy and freedom-for-all may be achieved in such a way that utopia remains forever closed, and we live in freedom and hell, debased of style, not individual from one another, void of courage, our fear rationalized away.”

And

“We’ve got an agreeable, comfortable life here as Americans. But under it there’s a huge, free-floating anxiety. Our inner lives, our inner landscape is just like that sky out there — it’s full of smog. We really don’t know what we believe anymore, we’re nervous about everything.”

And

“Writing can wreck your body. You sit there on the chair hour after hour and sweat your guts out to get a few words.”

And

“Heaven and Hell make no sense if the majority of humans are a complex mixture of good and evil. There’s no reason to receive a reward if you’re 57/43—why sit around forever in an elevated version of Club Med? That’s almost impossible to contemplate.”

And

“If a person is not talented enough to be a novelist, not smart enough to be a lawyer, and his hands are too shaky to perform operations, he becomes a journalist.”

Wikipedia Page:  Norman Mailer

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, February 13, 2017 – Theodore Roosevelt

 

“Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground.”

And

“With self-discipline most anything is possible.”

And

“People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. The leader leads, and the boss drives.”

And

“A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.”

And

“The best executive is one who has sense enough to pick good people to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.”

And

“The boy who is going to make a great man must not make up his mind merely to overcome a thousand obstacles, but to win in spite of a thousand repulses and defeats.”

And

“In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.”

And

“The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.”

And

“Get action. Seize the moment. Man was never intended to become an oyster.”

And

“I don’t pity any man who does hard work worth doing. I admire him. I pity the creature who does not work, at whichever end of the social scale he may regard himself as being.”

And

“The unforgivable crime is soft hitting. Do not hit at all if it can be avoided; but never hit softly.”

And

“Courtesy is as much a mark of a gentleman as courage.”

And

“When you are asked if you can do a job, tell ’em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.”

And

“To announce that there must be no criticism of the president… is morally treasonable to the American public.”

And

“The pacifist is as surely a traitor to his country and to humanity as is the most brutal wrongdoer.”

And

“Gentlemen: you have now reached the last point. If anyone of you doesn’t mean business let him say so now. An hour from now will be too late to back out. Once in, you’ve got to see it through. You’ve got to perform without flinching whatever duty is assigned you, regardless of the difficulty or the danger attending it. If it is garrison duty, you must attend to it. If it is meeting fever, you must be willing. If it is the closest kind of fighting, anxious for it. You must know how to ride, how to shoot, how to live in the open. Absolute obedience to every command is your first lesson. No matter what comes you mustn’t squeal. Think it over — all of you. If any man wishes to withdraw he will be gladly excused, for others are ready to take his place.” Address to U.S. Army recruits, 1898

And

“I wish to preach, not the doctrine of ignoble ease, but the doctrine of the strenuous life.”

And

“Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in that grey twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”

And

“I have always been fond of the West African proverb “Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.”

And

“Death is always and under all circumstances a tragedy, for if it is not, then it means that life itself has become one.”

And

“The first requisite of a good citizen in this Republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his weight; that he shall not be a mere passenger, but shall do his share in the work that each generation of us finds ready to hand; and, furthermore, that in doing his work he shall show, not only the capacity for sturdy self-help, but also self-respecting regard for the rights of others.”

And

“Our aim is not to do away with corporations; on the contrary, these big aggregations are an inevitable development of modern industrialism, and the effort to destroy them would be futile unless accomplished in ways that would work the utmost mischief to the entire body politic. We can do nothing of good in the way of regulating and supervising these corporations until we fix clearly in our minds that we are not attacking the corporations, but endeavoring to do away with any evil in them. We are not hostile to them; we are merely determined that they shall be so handled as to subserve the public good. We draw the line against misconduct, not against wealth.”

And

“A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled to, and less than that no man shall have.”

And

“Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.”

And

“No man is above the law and no man is below it; nor do we ask any man’s permission when we require him to obey it. Obedience to the law is demanded as a right; not asked as a favor.”

And

“The object of government is the welfare of the people. The material progress and prosperity of a nation are desirable chiefly so far as they lead to the moral and material welfare of all good citizens.”

And

“We wish to control big business so as to secure among other things good wages for the wage-workers and reasonable prices for the consumers. Wherever in any business the prosperity of the businessman is obtained by lowering the wages of his workmen and charging an excessive price to the consumers we wish to interfere and stop such practices. We will not submit to that kind of prosperity any more than we will submit to prosperity obtained by swindling investors or getting unfair advantages over business rivals.” Speech at Progressive Party Convention, Chicago, June 17, 1912

And

“A typical vice of American politics — the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues, and the announcement of radical policies with much sound and fury, and at the same time with a cautious accompaniment of weasel phrases each of which sucks the meat out of the preceding statement.”

And

“There are plenty of decent legislators, and plenty of able legislators; but the blamelessness and the fighting edge are not always combined. Both qualities are necessary for the man who is to wage active battle against the powers that prey. He must be clean of life, so that he can laugh when his public or his private record is searched; and yet being clean of life will not avail him if he is either foolish or timid. He must walk warily and fearlessly, and while he should never brawl if he can avoid it, he must be ready to hit hard if the need arises. Let him remember, by the way, that the unforgivable crime is soft hitting. Do not hit at all if it can be avoided; but never hit softly.”

And

“We stand equally against government by a plutocracy and government by a mob. There is something to be said for government by a great aristocracy which has furnished leaders to the nation in peace and war for generations; even a democrat like myself must admit this. But there is absolutely nothing to be said for government by a plutocracy, for government by men very powerful in certain lines and gifted with “the money touch,” but with ideals which in their essence are merely those of so many glorified pawnbrokers.”

And

“The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the Nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else.”

And

“A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.”

And

“In any moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.”

And

“The United States of America has not the option as to whether it will or it will not play a great part in the world … It must play a great part. All that it can decide is whether it will play that part well or badly.”

And

“In life, as in a football game, the principle to follow is: Never flinch.Never foul. Hit the line hard.”

And

“We must ever bear in mind that the great end in view is righteousness, justice as between man and man, nation and nation, the chance to lead our lives on a somewhat higher level, with a broader spirit of brotherly goodwill one for another. Peace is generally good in itself, but it is never the highest good unless it comes as the handmaid of righteousness; and it becomes a very evil thing if it serves merely as a mask for cowardice and sloth, or as an instrument to further the ends of despotism or anarchy. We despise and abhor the bully, the brawler, the oppressor, whether in private or public life, but we despise no less the coward and the voluptuary. No man is worth calling a man who will not fight rather than submit to infamy or see those that are dear to him suffer wrong. No nation deserves to exist if it permits itself to lose the stern and virile virtues; and this without regard to whether the loss is due to the growth of a heartless and all-absorbing commercialism, to prolonged indulgence in luxury and soft, effortless ease, or to the deification of a warped and twisted sentimentality.” Nobel Lecture, 1910

And

“I abhor unjust war. I abhor injustice and bullying by the strong at the expense of the weak, whether among nations or individuals. I abhor violence and bloodshed. I believe that war should never be resorted to when, or so long as, it is honorably possible to avoid it. I respect all men and women who from high motives and with sanity and self-respect do all they can to avert war. I advocate preparation for war in order to avert war; and I should never advocate war unless it were the only alternative to dishonor.” An Autobiography, 1913

And

“There are many kinds of success in life worth having. It is exceedingly interesting and attractive to be a successful business man, or railroad man, or farmer, or a successful lawyer or doctor; or a writer, or a President, or a ranchman, or the colonel of a fighting regiment, or to kill grizzly bears and lions. But for unflagging interest and enjoyment, a household of children, if things go reasonably well, certainly makes all other forms of success and achievement lose their importance by comparison. It may be true that he travels farthest who travels alone; but the goal thus reached is not worth reaching. And as for a life deliberately devoted to pleasure as an end — why, the greatest happiness is the happiness that comes as a by-product of striving to do what must be done, even though sorrow is met in the doing. There is a bit of homely philosophy, quoted by Squire Bill Widener, of Widener’s Valley, Virginia, which sums up one’s duty in life: “Do what you can, with what you’ve got, where you are.” An Autobiography, 1913

Wikipedia: Theodore Roosevelt

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, February 12, 2017 – Jack Nicklaus

 

 

“If I had only one more round to play, I would choose to play it at Pebble Beach. I’ve loved this course from the first time I saw it. It’s possibly the best in the world.”

And

“A kid grows up a lot faster on the golf course. Golf teaches you how to behave.”

And

“Concentration is a fine antidote to anxiety.”

And

“Confidence is the most important single factor in this game, and no matter how great your natural talent, there is only one way to obtain and sustain it: work.”

And

“Don’t be too proud to take lessons. I’m not.”

And

“Focus on remedies, not faults.”

And

“How people keep correcting us when we are young! There is always some bad habit or other they tell us we ought to get over. Yet most bad habits are tools to help us
through life.”

And

“I like trying to win. That’s what golf is all about. “

And

“I’m a firm believer that in the theory that people only do their best at things they truly enjoy. It is difficult to excel at something you don’t enjoy.”

And

“My ability to concentrate and work toward that goal has been my greatest asset.”

And

“Professional golf is the only sport where, if you win 20% of the time, you’re the best.”

And

“Resolve never to quit, never to give up, no matter what the situation.”

And

“Sometimes the biggest problem is in your head. You’ve got to believe you can play a shot instead of wondering where your next bad shot is coming from.”

And

“Success depends almost entirely on how effectively you learn to manage the game’s two ultimate adversaries: the course and yourself.”

And

“The game of golf is meant to be fun.”

And

“The two things that motivate me most are closely allied. They are failure and a desire for self-improvement.

By failure, I don’t necessarily mean getting beat, although that’s often the end result and in itself is a strong motivation to go to work. The kind of failing I’m talking about is failing to measure up to the standards I’ve set for myself personally. When that happens, I get an irresistible urge – almost a compulsion – to improve.
Whatever effort is necessary to prevent another failure, I just have to make it. Like now. Today.

Frankly, I believe this, more than anything else, is the reason I am where I am today. I’m not an easily satisfied person. Sure I take a lot of satisfaction in what I’ve achieved. But life doesn’t stand still. Every satisfaction wanes after a while, so if you’re like me you don’t sit around looking backwards. You try to move on, to look for something that gives you another satisfaction and, at the same time, hopefully adds a little more to your life.”Jack Nicklaus, Jack Nicklaus’ Playing Lessons, Chapter 1

And

“I never hit a shot, not even in practice, without having a very sharp, in-focus picture of it in my head. First I see the ball where I want it to finish, nice and white and sitting up high on the bright green grass. Then the scene quickly changes, and I see the ball going there: its path, trajectory, and shape, even its behavior on landing. Then there is a sort of fade-out, and the next scene shows me making the kind of swing that will turn the previous images into reality.”

And

“I like trying to win. That’s what golf is all about.”

And

Arnold Palmer, in 1962, after losing the U.S. Open to 22-year-old Nicklaus in a playoff: “Now that the big guy’s out of the cage, everybody better run for cover.”

And

Bobby Jones after watching Nicklaus win the 1965 Masters: “Nicklaus played a game with which I am not familiar.”

And

Author Rick Reilly: “He was not homespun like Sam Snead, funny like Lee Trevino. His pants didn’t need hitching like Palmer’s. Instead, he won over America with
pure, unbleached excellence.”

And

Chi Chi Rodriguez: “Jack Nicklaus is a legend in his spare time.”

And

Gene Sarazen: “I never thought anyone would ever put Hogan in the shadows, but he did.”

And

Tom Weiskopf: “Jack knew he was going to beat you. You knew Jack was going to beat you. And Jack knew that you knew that he was going to beat you.”

Wikipedia:  Jack Nicklaus

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, February 11, 2017 – Bing Crosby

 

BingCrosby282919

“Frank (Frank Sinatra) is a singer who comes along once in a lifetime, but why did he have to come in mine?”

And

“I think popular music in this country is one of the few things in the 20th century that have made great strides in reverse.”

And

“Honestly, I think I`ve stretched a talent which is so thin it`s almost transparent over a quite unbelievable term of years.”

And

“(Bing Crosby’s own epitaph) He was an average guy who could carry a tune.”

And

“Once or twice I`ve been described as a light comedian. I consider this the most accurate description of my abilities I`ve ever seen.”

And

“(on Bob Hope) Hope? He`s got more money on him than I have.”

And

“(on Judy Garland) The most talented woman I ever knew was Judy Garland. She was a great, great comedienne and she could do more things than any girl I ever
knew. Act, sing, dance, make you laugh. She was everything. I had a great affection for her. Such a tragedy. Too much work, too much pressure, the wrong kind of
people as husbands.”

And

“(on Fred Astaire) But when you`re in a picture with Astaire, you`ve got rocks in your head if you do much dancing. He`s so quick-footed and so light that it`s
impossible not to look like a hay-digger compared with him.”

And

“My golf is woeful but I will never surrender.”

And

“Unless we make Christmas an occasion to share our blessings, all the snow in Alaska won`t make it “white”.”

And

“There is nothing in the world I wouldn`t do for Hope, and there is nothing he wouldn`t do for me… We spend our lives doing nothing for each other.”

And

“That was a great game of golf, fellas.”

And

“Fore!

Straight down the middle
It went straight down the middle
Then it started to hook just a wee, wee bit
That’s when my caddie lost sight of it
That little white pellet has never been found to this day
But it went straight down the middle like they say

Whack down the fairway
It went smack down the fairway
Then it started to slice just a smidge off line
It headed for two then it bounced off nine
My caddie says long as you’re still in the state you’re okay
Yes it went straight down the middle quite a ways

The sun was never brighter
The greens were never greener
And I was never keener to play
I heard it came down the middle
It went zing down the middle
Oh the life of a golfer is not all gloom
There’s always the lies in the locker room
And I’m in my glory when wrapped in a towel I say
That it went straight down the middle today

Oh the life of a golfer is not all gloom
Though they should charge just for listening in the locker room
But I’m in my glory when wrapped in a towel I say
That it went straight down the middle
Where it wound up is a riddle
But it went straight down the middle far away”
Straight Down the Middle, Bing Crosby

Wikipedia:  Bing Crosby

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, February 10, 2017 – Robert Louis Stevenson

 

“A friend is a gift you give yourself.”

And

“All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.”

And

“An aim in life is the only fortune worth finding.”

And

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”

And

“Everyone lives by selling something.”

And

“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.”

And

“I never weary of great churches. It is my favorite kind of mountain scenery. Mankind was never so happily inspired as when it made a cathedral.”

And

“It is the mark of a good action that it appears inevitable in retrospect.”

And

“Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.”

And

“Most of our pocket wisdom is conceived for the use of mediocre people, to discourage them from ambitious attempts, and generally console them in their mediocrity.”

And

“Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation and is thought necessary.”

And

“Talk is by far the most accessible of pleasures. It costs nothing in money, it is all profit, it completes our education, founds and fosters our friendships, and can be enjoyed at any age and in almost any state of health.”

And

“The world has no room for cowards.”

And

“To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

And

“To become what we are capable of becoming is the only end in life.”

And

“We must accept life for what it actually is – a challenge to our quality without which we should never know of what stuff we are made, or grow to our full stature.”

And

“You cannot run away from weakness; you must some time fight it out or perish; and if that be so, why not now, and where you stand?”

And

“You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us.”

And

“So long as we love we serve; so long as we are loved by others, I would almost say that we are indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend.”

And

“The Monterey Peninsula is the greatest meeting of land and sea in the world.”

Wikipedia:  Robert Louis Stevenson

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, February 9, 2017 – F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

“A big man has no time really to do anything but just sit and be big.”

And

“Action is character.”

And

“Advertising is a racket, like the movies and the brokerage business. You cannot be honest without admitting that its constructive contribution to humanity is exactly minus zero.”

And

“An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmaster of ever afterwards.”

And

“Either you think, or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.”

And

“Every one suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues.”

And

“First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.”

And

“Genius is the ability to put into effect what is on your mind.”

And

“I like people and I like them to like me, but I wear my heart where God put it, on the inside.”

And

“Life is essentially a cheat and its conditions are those of defeat; the redeeming things are not happiness and pleasure but the deeper satisfactions that come out of struggle.”

And

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

And

“Scratch a Yale man with both hands and you’ll be lucky to find a coast-guard. Usually you find nothing at all.”

And

“Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy.”

And

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“You don’t write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.”

And

“Once one is caught up into the material world not one person in ten thousand finds the time to form literary taste, to examine the validity of philosophic concepts for himself, or to form what, for lack of a better phrase, I might call the wise and tragic sense of life.”

Amd

“Isn’t Hollywood a dump — in the human sense of the word. A hideous town, pointed up by the insulting gardens of its rich, full of the human spirit at a new low of debasement.”

And

“Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft, where we are hard, cynical where we are trustful, in a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to understand.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“Before I go on with this short history, let me make a general observation – the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise. This philosophy fitted on to my early adult life, when I saw the improbable, the implausible, often the “impossible,” come true.”

And

“All good writing is swimming under water and holding your breath.

And

“My generation of radicals and breakers-down never found anything to take the place of the old virtues of work and courage and the old graces of courtesy and politeness.”

And

“Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy.”

And

“On the last night, with my trunk packed and my car sold to the grocer, I went over and looked at that huge incoherent failure of a house once more. On the white steps an obscene word, scrawled by some boy with a piece of brick, stood out clearly in the moonlight, and I erased it, drawing my shoe raspingly along the stone. Then I wandered down to the beach and sprawled out on the sand.

Most of the big shore places were closed now and there were hardly any lights except the shadowy, moving glow of a ferryboat across the Sound. And as the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes—a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” The Ending of The Great Gatsby, 1925

Wikipedia:  F. Scott Fitzgerald

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, February 8, 2017 – Napoleon Bonaparte

 

Napoleon2882

“A man will fight harder for his interests than for his rights.”

And

“A revolution can be neither made nor stopped. The only thing that can be done is for one of several of its children to give it a direction by dint of victories.”

And

“A soldier will fight long and hard for a bit of colored ribbon.”

And

“Ability is nothing without opportunity.”

And

“Courage is like love; it must have hope for nourishment.”

And

“Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.”

And

“Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets.”

And

“Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever.”

And

“Great ambition is the passion of a great character. Those endowed with it may perform very good or very bad acts. All depends on the principles which direct them.”

And

“He who fears being conquered is sure of defeat.”

And

“I love power. But it is as an artist that I love it. I love it as a musician loves his violin, to draw out its sounds and chords and harmonies.”

And

“If you want a thing done well, do it yourself”.

And

“Impossible is a word to be found only in the dictionary of fools.”

And

“It requires more courage to suffer than to die.”

And

“Men are moved by two levers only: fear and self interest.”

And

“Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide.”

And

“One must change one’s tactics every ten years if one wishes to maintain one’s superiority.”

And

“Take time to deliberate, but when the time for action has arrived, stop thinking and go in.”

And

“The battlefield is a scene of constant chaos. The winner will be the one who controls that chaos, both his own and the enemies.”

And

“The first virtue in a soldier is endurance of fatigue; courage is only the second virtue.”

And

“The people to fear are not those who disagree with you, but those who disagree with you and are too cowardly to let you know.”

And

“The strong man is the one who is able to intercept at will the communication between the senses and the mind.”

And

“The truest wisdom is a resolute determination.”

And

“To do all that one is able to do, is to be a man; to do all that one would like to do, is to be a god.”

And

“Victory belongs to the most persevering.”

And

“When soldiers have been baptized in the fire of a battle-field, they have all one rank in my eyes.”

And

“With audacity one can undertake anything, but not do everything.”

And

“If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks, glory would become the prey of mediocre minds…. I have made all the calculations; fate will do the rest.”

And

“Success is the most convincing talker in the world.”

And

“Impatience is a great obstacle to success; he who treats everything with brusqueness gathers nothing, or only immature fruit which will never ripen.”

And

“The fool has one great advantage over a man of sense — he is always satisfied with himself.”

And

“How many seemingly impossible things have been accomplished by resolute men because they had to do, or die.”

And

“At the beginning of a campaign it is important to consider whether or not to move forward; but when one has taken the offensive it is necessary to maintain it to the last extremity.”

And

“In a battle, as in a siege, the art consists in concentrating very heavy fire on a particular point. The line of battle once established, the one who has the ability to concentrate an unlooked for mass of artillery suddenly and unexpectedly on one of these points is sure to carry the day.”

And

“The secret of great battles consists in knowing how to deploy and concentrate at the right time.”

And

“A man who has no consideration for the needs of his men ought never to be given command.”

Wikipedia:  Napoleon Bonaparte

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, February 7, 2017 – Carl Sagan

 

CarlSagan777

“All of the books in the world contain no more information than is broadcast as video in a single large American city in a single year. Not all bits have equal value.”

And

“But the fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright Brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.”

And

“For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.”

And

“For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.”

And

“I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students.”

And

“I can find in my undergraduate classes, bright students who do not know that the stars rise and set at night, or even that the Sun is a star.”

And

“If we long to believe that the stars rise and set for us, that we are the reason there is a Universe, does science do us a disservice in deflating our conceits?”

And

“If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.”

And

“Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere.”

And

“Our species needs, and deserves, a citizenry with minds wide awake and a basic understanding of how the world works.”

And

“Personally, I would be delighted if there were a life after death, especially if it permitted me to continue to learn about this world and others, if it gave me a chance to discover how history turns out.”

And

“Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge.”

And

“Skeptical scrutiny is the means, in both science and religion, by which deep thoughts can be winnowed from deep nonsense.”

And

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”

And

“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.”

And

“The universe is not required to be in perfect harmony with human ambition.”

And

“The universe seems neither benign nor hostile, merely indifferent.”

And

“We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”

and

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

And

“Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people.”

And

“The truth may be puzzling. It may take some work to grapple with. It may be counterintuitive. It may contradict deeply held prejudices. It may not be consonant with what we desperately want to be true. But our preferences do not determine what’s true. We have a method, and that method helps us to reach not absolute truth, only asymptotic approaches to the truth — never there, just closer and closer, always finding vast new oceans of undiscovered possibilities. Cleverly designed experiments are the key.”

And

“Who is more humble? The scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever it has to teach us, or somebody who says everything in this book must be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of all the human beings involved?”

And

“The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion and politics, but it is not the path to knowledge; it has no place in the endeavor of science.”

And

“Matter is composed chiefly of nothing.”

And

“Other things being equal, it is better to be smart than to be stupid.”

And

“Every one of us is, in the cosmic perspective, precious. If a human disagrees with you, let him live. In a hundred billion galaxies, you will not find another.”

And

“Humans are very good at dreaming, although you’d never know it from your television.”

And

“In the fabric of space and in the nature of matter, as in a great work of art, there is, written small, the artist’s signature.”

And

“We on Earth have just awakened to the great oceans of space and time from which we have emerged. We are the legacy of 15 billion years of cosmic evolution. We have a choice: We can enhance life and come to know the universe that made us, or we can squander our 15 billion-year heritage in meaningless self-destruction. What happens in the first second of the next cosmic year depends on what we do, here and now, with our intelligence and our knowledge of the cosmos.”

And

“As a boy Kepler had been captured by a vision of cosmic splendour, a harmony of the worlds which he sought so tirelessly all his life. Harmony in this world eluded him. His three laws of planetary motion represent, we now know, a real harmony of the worlds, but to Kepler they were only incidental to his quest for a cosmic system based on the Perfect Solids, a system which, it turns out, existed only in his mind. Yet from his work, we have found that scientific laws pervade all of nature, that the same rules apply on Earth as in the skies, that we can find a resonance, a harmony, between the way we think and the way the world works. When he found that his long cherished beliefs did not agree with the most precise observations, he accepted the uncomfortable facts, he preferred the hard truth to his dearest illusions. That is the heart of science.”

And

“Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar”, every “supreme leader”, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

And

“A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the Moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the Moon these days.”

And

“Education on the value of free speech and the other freedoms reserved by the Bill of Rights, about what happens when you don’t have them, and about how to exercise and protect them, should be an essential prerequisite for being an American citizen — or indeed a citizen of any nation, the more so to the degree that such rights remain unprotected. If we can’t think for ourselves, if we’re unwilling to question authority, then we’re just putty in the hands of those in power. But if the citizens are educated and form their own opinions, then those in power work for us. In every country, we should be teaching our children the scientific method and the reasons for a Bill of Rights. With it comes a certain decency, humility and community spirit. In the demon-haunted world that we inhabit by virtue of being human, this may be all that stands between us and the enveloping darkness.”

And

“When we consider the founders of our nation: Jefferson, Washington, Samuel and John Adams, Madison and Monroe, Benjamin Franklin, Tom Paine and many others; we have before us a list of at least ten and maybe even dozens of great political leaders. They were well educated. Products of the European Enlightenment, they were students of history. They knew human fallibility and weakness and corruptibility. They were fluent in the English language. They wrote their own speeches. They were realistic and practical, and at the same time motivated by high principles. They were not checking the pollsters on what to think this week. They knew what to think. They were comfortable with long-term thinking, planning even further ahead than the next election. They were self-sufficient, not requiring careers as politicians or lobbyists to make a living. They were able to bring out the best in us. They were interested in and, at least two of them, fluent in science. They attempted to set a course for the United States into the far future — not so much by establishing laws as by setting limits on what kinds of laws could be passed. The Constitution and its Bill of Rights have done remarkably well, constituting, despite human weaknesses, a machine able, more often than not, to correct its own trajectory. At that time, there were only about two and a half million citizens of the United States. Today there are about a hundred times more. So if there were ten people of the caliber of Thomas Jefferson then, there ought to be 10 x 100 = 1,000 Thomas Jefferson’s today. Where are they?”

Wikipedia:  Carl Sagan

(more…)

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, February 6, 2017 – Paul Brown

 

PaulBrown778

“A winner never whines.”

And

“Football is a game of errors. The team that makes the fewest errors in a game usually wins.”

And

“The key to winning is poise under stress.”

And

“What we have currently available is what we have available.”

And

“When you win, say nothing. When you lose, say less.”

And

“You can learn a line from a win and a book from a defeat.”

Wikipedia:  Paul Brown

(more…)