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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 9, 2020 – Woody Hayes

 

“I’ve had smarter people around me all my life, but I haven’t run into one yet that can outwork me. And if they can’t outwork you, then smarts aren’t going to do them much good. That’s just the way it is. And if you believe that and live by it, you’d be surprised at how much fun you can have.”

And

“Without winners, there wouldn’t even be any civilization.”

And

“There’s nothing that cleanses your soul like getting the hell kicked out of you.”

And

“The height of human desire is what wins, whether it’s on Normandy Beach or in Ohio Stadium.”

And

“I’m not coming here looking for security. I came here for the opportunity.” Upon accepting Ohio State head coaching job

And

“Paralyze resistance with persistence.”

And

“I don’t live in the past. I’m a student of the past, and I try to learn from the past, although some people will say, ‘You haven’t done a very good job of it.’ But for me to live in the past? Hell, no.'”

And

“A man is always better than he thinks.”

And

“I can accept failure, but I can’t accept not trying.”

And

“The time you give a man something he doesn’t earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect.”

And

“Success – it ‘s what you do with what you’ve got.”

And

“Coaches who can outline plays on a black board are a dime a dozen. The ones who win get inside their players heads and motivate them.”

And

“I’m not trying to win a popularity poll. I’m trying to win football games. I don’t like nice people. I like tough, honest people.”

And

“I don’t apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there. I just despise to lose, and that has taken a man of mediocre ability and made a pretty good coach out of him.”

And

“Just remember one thing. I can do your job, but you can’t do mine.” – to an OSU professor

And

“I love football. I think it is most wonderful game in world and I despise to lose.”

Wikipedia:  Woody Hayes

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 8, 2020 – Jim Lovell

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“Be thankful for problems. If they were less difficult, someone with less ability might have your job.”

And

“Houston, we’ve had a problem here.”

And

“The moon is essentially gray, no color. It looks like plaster of Paris, like dirty beach sand with lots of footprints in it.”

And

“There are people who make things happen, there are people who watch things happen, and there are people who wonder what happened. To be successful, you need to be a person who makes things happen.”

And

“From now on, we live in a world where man has walked on the moon. It wasn’t a miracle, we just decided to go.”

Wikipedia:  Jim Lovell

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – October 7, 2020 – Ray Charles

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“I was born with music inside me. Music was one of my parts. Like my ribs, my kidneys, my liver, my heart. Like my blood. It was a force already within me when I arrived on the scene. It was a necessity for me-like food or water.”

And

“I did it to myself. It wasn’t society… it wasn’t a pusher, it wasn’t being blind or being black or being poor. It was all my doing.”

And

“What makes my approach special is that I do different things. I do jazz, blues, country music and so forth. I do them all, like a good utility man.”

And

“Love is a special word, and I use it only when I mean it. You say the word too much and it becomes cheap.”

And

“Affluence separates people. Poverty knits ’em together. You got some sugar and I don’t; I borrow some of yours. Next month you might not have any flour; well, I’ll give you some of mine.”

And

“I don’t know what would have happened to me if I hadn’t been able to hear.”

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“There’s nothing written in the Bible, Old or New testament, that says, ‘If you believe in Me, you ain’t going to have no troubles.'”

And

“I never wanted to be famous. I only wanted to be great.”

And

“There are many spokes on the wheel of life. First, we’re here to explore new possibilities.”

And

“Learning to read music in Braille and play by ear helped me develop a damn good memory.”

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“Music’s been around a long time, and there’s going to be music long after Ray Charles is dead. I just want to make my mark, leave something musically good behind. If it’s a big record, that’s the frosting on the cake, but music’s the main meal.”

And

“What is a soul? It’s like electricity – we don’t really know what it is, but it’s a force that can light a room.”

And

“My music had roots which I’d dug up from my own childhood, musical roots buried in the darkest soil.”

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“My version of ‘Georgia’ became the state song of Georgia. That was a big thing for me, man. It really touched me. Here is a state that used to lynch people like me suddenly declaring my version of a song as its state song. That is touching.”

And

“The fact of the matter is, you don’t give up what’s natural. Anything I’ve fantasized about, I’ve done.”

And

“Hey mama, don’t you treat me wrong,
Come and love your daddy all night long.
All right now, hey hey, all right.
See the girl with the diamond ring;
She knows how to shake that thing.
All right now now now, hey hey, hey hey.
Tell your mama, tell your pa,
I’m gonna send you back to Arkansas.
Oh yes, ma’m, you don’t do right, don’t do right.”
What’d I Say, from the album What’d I Say (1957)

And

“Soul is when you take a song and make it a part of you — a part that’s so true, so real, people think it must have happened to you. … It’s like electricity — we don’t really know what it is, do we? But it’s a force that can light a room. Soul is like electricity, like a spirit, a drive, a power.”

And

“But now if I can wrap myself up in that song, and when that song gets to be a part of me, and affects me emotionally, then the emotions that I go through, chances are I’ll be able to communicate to you. Make the people out there become a part of the life of this song that you’re singing about. That’s soul when you can do that.”

And

“I started to sing like myself — as opposed to imitating Nat Cole, which I had done for a while — when I started singing like Ray Charles, it had this spiritual and churchy, this religious or gospel sound. It had this holiness and preachy tone to it. It was very controversial. I got a lot of criticism for it.”

And

“Do it right or don’t do it at all. That comes from my mom. If there’s something I want to do, I’m one of those people that won’t be satisfied until I get it done. If I’m trying to sing something and I can’t get it, I’m going to keep at it until I get where I want it.”

And

“You better live every day like your last because one day you’re going to be right.”

And

“Before I begin, let me say right here and now that I’m a country boy. And, man, I mean the real backwoods! That’s at the start of the start of the thing, and that’s at the heart of the thing.”

And

“I was born with music inside me. That’s the only explanation I know of, since none of my relatives could sing or play an instrument. Music was one of my parts. Like my ribs, my kidneys, my liver, my heart. Like my blood. It was a force already within me when I arrived on the scene. It was a necessity for me — like food or water.”

And

“When I was going blind, I didn’t turn to God. It didn’t seem to me then — and it doesn’t seem to me now — that those items were His concern. Early on, I figured I better begin to learn how to count on myself, instead of counting on supernatural forces.”

And

“Oh beautiful for heroes proved,
In liberating strife,
Who more than self, our country loved,
And mercy more than life,

America, America may God thy gold refine,
Til all success be nobleness
And every gain devined.

And you know when I was in school,
We used to sing it something like this, listen here:

Oh beautiful, for spacious skies,
For amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties,
Above the fruited plain,

But now wait a minute, I’m talking about
America, sweet America
You know, God done shed his grace on thee,
He crowned thy good, yes he did, in brotherhood,
From sea to shining sea.

You know, I wish I had somebody to help me sing this
(America, America, God shed his grace on thee)
America, I love you America, you see,
My God he done shed his grace on thee,
And you oughta love him for it,
Cause he, he, he ,he crowned thy good,
He told me he would, with brotherhood,
(From sea to shining Sea).
Oh lord, oh lord, I thank you Lord
(Shining sea).”
America the Beautiful, Ray Charles

Wikipedia Page: Ray Charles

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, October 6, 2020 – Omar Bradley

OmarB2991

“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

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“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

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“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

And

“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

And

“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

And

“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

And

“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

And

“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

And

“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

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Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

And

An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, October 5, 2020 – Joseph Campbell

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“A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.”

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“Find a place inside where there’s joy, and the joy will burn out the pain.”

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“Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.”

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“I don’t believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.”

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“Is the system going to flatten you out and deny you your humanity, or are you going to be able to make use of the system to the attainment of human purposes?”

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“It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life. Where you stumble, there lies your treasure.”

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“Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning.”

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“Opportunities to find deeper powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging.”

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“The big question is whether you are going to be able to say a hearty yes to your adventure.”

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“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature.”

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“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.”

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“We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us.”

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“When we quit thinking primarily about ourselves and our own self-preservation, we undergo a truly heroic transformation of consciousness.”

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“When you make the sacrifice in marriage, you’re sacrificing not to each other but to unity in a relationship.”

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“Your life is the fruit of your own doing. You have no one to blame but yourself.”

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“Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.”

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“It’s only when a man tames his own demons that he becomes the king of himself if not of the world.”

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“The achievement of the hero is one that he is ready for and it’s really a manifestation of his character.”

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“People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonance within our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive. That’s what it’s all finally about.”

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“One thing that comes out in myths is that at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light.”

And

“The way to find out about your happiness is to keep your mind on those moments when you feel most happy, when you really are happy-not excited, not just thrilled, but deeply happy. This requires a little bit of self analysis. What is it that makes you happy? Stay with it, no matter what people tell you. This is what I call “following your bliss.”

And

“The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read, not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man. …Tragedy is the shattering of the forms and of our attachment to the forms… the two are the terms of a single mythological theme… the down-going and the up-coming (kathados and anodos), which together constitute the totality of the revelation that is life, and which the individual must know and love if he is to be purged (katharsis=purgatorio) of the contagion of sin (disobedience to the divine will) and death (identification with the mortal form). “All things are changing; nothing dies…”

And

“Eternity isn’t some later time. Eternity isn’t a long time. Eternity has nothing to do with time. Eternity is that dimension of here and now which thinking and time cuts out. This is it. And if you don’t get it here, you won’t get it anywhere. And the experience of eternity right here and now is the function of life. There’s a wonderful formula that the Buddhists have for the Bodhisattva, the one whose being (sattva) is illumination (bodhi), who realizes his identity with eternity and at the same time his participation in time. And the attitude is not to withdraw from the world when you realize how horrible it is, but to realize that this horror is simply the foreground of a wonder and to come back and participate in it. “All life is sorrowful” is the first Buddhist saying, and it is. It wouldn’t be life if there were not temporality involved which is sorrow. Loss, loss, loss.”

And

“Follow your bliss.”

And

“Bill Moyers: Unlike heroes such as Prometheus or Jesus, we’re not going on our journey to save the world but to save ourselves.
Joseph Campbell: But in doing that you save the world. The influence of a vital person vitalizes, there’s no doubt about it. The world without spirit is a wasteland. People have the notion of saving the world by shifting things around, changing the rules, and who’s on top, and so forth. No, no! Any world is a valid world if it’s alive. The thing to do is to bring life to it, and the only way to do that is to find in your own case where the life is and become alive yourself.”

And

“Marx teaches us to blame society for our frailties, Freud teaches us to blame our parents, and astrology teaches us to blame the universe. The only place to look for blame is within: you didn’t have the guts to bring up your full moon and live the life that was your potential.”

Wikipedia:  Joseph Campbell

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, October 4, 2020 – Frank Lloyd Wright

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“A free America… means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call democracy is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

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“Early in life I had to choose between honest arrogance and hypocritical humility. I chose the former and have seen no reason to change.”

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“Freedom is from within.”

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“Get the habit of analysis – analysis will in time enable synthesis to become your habit of mind.”

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“Harvard takes perfectly good plums as students, and turns them into prunes.”

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“I believe totally in a Capitalist System, I only wish that someone would try it.”

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“I know the price of success:  dedication, hard work and an unremitting devotion to thing you want to see happen.”

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“Life always rides in strength to victory, not through internationalism… but only through the direct responsibility of the individual.”

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“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.”

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“The heart is the chief feature of a functioning mind.”

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“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.”

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“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

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“The thing always happens that you really believe in; and the belief in a thing makes it happen.”

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“The truth is more important than the facts.”

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“”Think simple” as my old master used to say – meaning reduce the whole of its parts into the simplest terms, getting back to first principles.”

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“There is nothing more uncommon than common sense.”

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“No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It should be of the hill. Belonging to it. Hill and house should live together each the happier for the other.”

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“A free America, democratic in the sense that our forefathers intended it to be, means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call ‘democracy’ is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

And

“Every great architect is — necessarily — a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.”

And

“Human beings can be beautiful. If they are not beautiful it is entirely their own fault. It is what they do to themselves that makes them ugly. The longer I live the more beautiful life becomes. If you foolishly ignore beauty, you will soon find yourself without it. Your life will be impoverished. But if you invest in beauty, it will remain with you all the days of your life.”

And

“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

Wikipedia:  Frank Lloyd Wright

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, October 3, 2020 – John Heisman

JohnHeisman777

“Don’t cuss. Don’t argue with the officials. And don’t lose the game.”

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“When you find your opponent’s weak spot, hammer it.”

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“To break training without permission is an act of treason.”

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“When in doubt, punt!”

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“The true football fan pays no attention to time or mileage when there is a big game to see.”

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“Coaches should be masterful, commanding, even dictatorial. A coach has no time to say “please” or “mister.” Occasionally he must be severe.”

Wikipedia:  John Heisman

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Coaches Hot Seat Blog Quotes of the Day – Friday, October 2, 2020 – Louis L’Amour

“A good beginning makes a good end.” 

And

“A wise man fights to win, but he is twice a fool who has no plan for possible defeat.”

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“All loose things seem to drift down to the sea, and so did I.”

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“Anger is a killing thing: it kills the man who angers, for each rage leaves him less than he had been before – it takes something from him.” 

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“For one who reads, there is no limit to the number of lives that may be lived, for fiction, biography, and history offer an inexhaustible number of lives in many parts of the world, in all periods of time.”

And

“He might never really do what he said, but at least he had it in mind. He had somewhere to go.”

And

“Knowledge is like money: to be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.” 

And

“No memory is ever alone; it’s at the end of a trail of memories, a dozen trails that each have their own associations.”

And

“No one can get an education, for of necessity education is a continuing process.”

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“Nobody got anywhere in the world by simply being content.”

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“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. Yet that will be the beginning.”

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“To disbelieve is easy; to scoff is simple; to have faith is harder.”

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“To make democracy work, we must be a notion of participants, not simply observers. One who does not vote has no right to complain.”

And

“Too often I would hear men boast of the miles covered that day, rarely of what they had seen.”

And

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”

And

“One day I was speeding along at the typewriter, and my daughter – who was a child at the time – asked me, “Daddy, why are you writing so fast?” And I replied, “Because I want to see how the story turns out!”

Wikipedia:  Louis L’Amour

www.louislamour.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, October 1, 2020 – Howard Schultz

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And

“Dream more than others think practical.”

And

“Expect more than others think possible.”

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“Risk more than others think safe.”

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“I believe life is a series of near misses. A lot of what we ascribe to luck is not luck at all. It’s seizing the day and accepting responsibility for your future. It’s seeing what other people don’t see And pursuing that vision.”

And

“People want to be part of something larger than themselves. They want to be part of something they’re really proud of, that they’ll fight for, sacrifice for, that they trust.”

And

“There are moments in our lives when we summon the courage to make choices that go against reason, against common sense and the wise counsel of people we trust. But we lean forward nonetheless because, despite all risks and rational argument, we believe that the path we are choosing is the right and best thing to do. We refuse to be bystanders, even if we do not know exactly where our actions will lead.

This is the kind of passionate conviction that sparks romances, wins battles, and drives people to pursue dreams others wouldn’t dare. Belief in ourselves and in what is right catapults us over hurdles, and our lives unfold.

“Life is a sum of all your choices,” wrote Albert Camus. Large or small, our actions forge our futures and hopefully inspire others along the way.”

And

“In this ever-changing society, the most powerful and enduring brands are built from the heart. They are real and sustainable. Their foundations are stronger because they are built with the strength of the human spirit, not an ad campaign. The companies that are lasting are those that are authentic.”

And

“Remember: You’ll be left with an empty feeling if you hit the finish line alone. When you run a race as a team, though, you’ll discover that much of the reward comes from hitting the tape together. You want to be surrounded not just by cheering onlookers but by a crowd of winners, celebrating as one.”

And

“To stay vigorous, a company needs to provide a stimulating and challenging environment for all these types: the dreamer, the entrepreneur, the professional manager, and the leader. If it doesn’t, it risks becoming yet another mediocre corporation.”

And

“People want guidance, not rhetoric. They need to know what the plan of action is, and how it will be implemented. They want to be given responsibility to help solve the problem and authority to act on it.”

And

“There is a word that comes to my mind when I think about our company and our people. That word is ‘love.’ I love Starbucks because everything we’ve tried to do is steeped in humanity.

Respect and dignity.
Passion and laughter.
Compassion, community, and responsibility.
Authenticity.

These are Starbucks’ touchstones, the source of our pride.”

And

“There’s a metaphor Vincent Eades likes to use: “If you examine a butterfly according to the laws of aerodynamics, it shouldn’t be able to fly. But the butterfly doesn’t know that, so it flies.”

And

“One of the fundamental aspects of leadership, I realized more and more, is the ability to instill confidence in others when you yourself are feeling insecure”

And

“It’s one thing to dream, but when the moment is right, you’ve got to be willing to leave what’s familiar and go out to find your own sound.”

And

“Every step of the way, I made a point to underpromise and overdeliver. In the long run, that’s the only way to ensure security in any job.”

And

“Treat people like family, and they will be loyal and give their all. Stand by people, and they will stand by you. It’s the oldest formula in business, one that is second nature to many family-run firms. Yet in the late 1980s, it seemed to be forgotten.”

And

“While Wall Street has taught me a lot, its most enduring lesson is an understanding of just how artificial a stock price is. It’s all too easy to regard it as the true value of your company, and even the value of yourself.”

And

“At a certain stage in a company’s development, an entrepreneur has to develop into a professional manager. That often goes against the grain.”

And

“Whatever you do, don’t play it safe. Don’t do things the way they’ve always been done. Don’t try to fit the system. If you do what’s expected of you, you’ll never accomplish more than others expect.”

And

“It’s seizing the day and accepting responsibility for your future. It’s seeing what other people don’t see, and pursuing that vision no matter who tells you not to.”

Wikipedia:  Howard Schultz

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, September 30, 2020 – Amelia Earhart

AmeliaEarhart281818

“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

And

“Better do a good deed near at home than go far away to burn incense.”

And

“Courage is the price that Life exacts for granting peace, The soul that knows it not, knows no release from little things.”

And

“Flying might not be all plain sailing, but the fun of it is worth the price.”

And

“I want to do it because I want to do it.”

And

“In soloing – as in other activities – it is far easier to start something than it is to finish it.”

And

“Never do things others can do and will do if there are things others cannot do or will not do.”

And

“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.”

And

“Obviously I faced the possibility of not returning when first I considered going. Once faced and settled there really wasn’t any good reason to refer to it.”

And

“Please know that I am aware of the hazards. I want to do it because I want to do it. Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail, their failure must be a challenge to others.”

And

“The more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one’s appreciation of fundamental things like home, and love, and understanding companionship.”

And

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure , the process is its own reward.”

And

“The most effective way to do it, is to do it.”

And

“The woman who can create her own job is the woman who will win fame and fortune.”

And

“There are two kinds of stones, as everyone knows, one of which rolls.”

And

“There is so much that must be done in a civilized barbarism like war.”

And

“Women must pay for everything. They do get more glory than men for comparable feats, but, they also get more notoriety when they crash.”

And

“Women must try to do things as men have tried. When they fail their failure must be but a challenge to others.”

And

“Women, like men, should try to do the impossible. And when they fail, their failure should be a challenge to others.”

And

“The more one does and sees and feels, the more one is able to do, and the more genuine may be one’s appreciation of fundamental things like home, and love, and understanding companionship.”

And

“Adventure is worthwhile in itself.”

And

“No kind action ever stops with itself. One kind action leads to another. Good example is followed. A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new trees. The greatest work that kindness does to others is that it makes them kind themselves.”

And

“In my life I had come to realize that when things were going very well indeed it was just the time to anticipate trouble. And, conversely, I learned from pleasant experience that at the most despairing crisis, when all looked sour beyond words, some delightful “break” was apt to lurk just around the corner.”

And

“The soul’s dominion? Each time we make a choice, we pay with courage to behold restless day and count it fair.”

And

“Anticipation, I suppose, sometimes exceeds realization.”

And

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward.”

And

“Worry retards reaction and makes clear-cut decisions impossible.”

And

“…decide…whether or not the goal is worth the risks involved. If it is, stop worrying….”

And

“Not much more than a month ago I was on the other shore of the Pacific, looking westward. This evening, I looked eastward over the Pacific. In those fast-moving days which have intervened, the whole width of the world has passed behind us -except this broad ocean. I shall be glad when we have the hazards of its navigation behind us.” — Amelia Earhart, several days before she left for Howland Island and disappeared

Wikipedia: Amelia Earhart

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