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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, April 14, 2020 – Bum Phillips

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“How do you win? By getting average players to play good and good players to play great. That’s how you win.”

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“The only discipline that lasts is self-discipline.”

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“Two kinds of ballplayers aren’t worth a darn: One that never does what he’s told, and one who does nothin’ except what he’s told.”

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“Winning is only half of it. Having fun is the other half.”

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“You don’t know a ladder has splinters until you slide down it.”

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“You don’t win by making sensational plays; you win by not making mistakes.”

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“He can take his’n and beat your’n and take your’n and beat his’n.” About Paul “Bear” Bryant

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“When it’s first and a mile, I won’t give it to him.” On Earl Campbell’s inability to finish a 1 mile run in training camp

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“There’s two kinds of coaches, them that’s fired and them that’s gonna be fired.”

Wikipedia:  Bum Phillips

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, April 13, 2020 – Bud Wilkinson

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“Football in its purest form remains a physical fight. As in any fight, if you don’t want to fight, it’s impossible to win.”

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“Morale and attitude are the fundamental ingredients to success.”

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“If a team is to reach its potential, each player must willingly subordinate his own personal goals to the good of the team.”

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“We compete, not so much against an opponent, but against ourselves. The real test is this: Did I make my best effort on every play?”

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“I feel more strongly about this than anything else in coaching: Anybody who lacks discipline, who doesn’t want to be part of the team, who doesn’t want to meet the requirements – has to go. It’s that simple.”

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“The man who tried his best and failed is superior to the man who never tried.”

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“Losing is easy. It’s not enjoyable, but it’s easy.”

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“If you are going to be a champion, you must be willing to pay a greater price.”

Wikipedia:  Bud Wilkinson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, April 12, 2020 – Saint Augustine

SaintA777

“Faith is to believe what you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe.”

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“The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.”

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“Forgiveness is the remission of sins. For it is by this that what has been lost, and was found, is saved from being lost again.”

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“If two friends ask you to judge a dispute, don’t accept, because you will lose one friend; on the other hand, if two strangers come with the same request, accept because you will gain one friend.”

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“Do you wish to be great? Then begin by being. Do you desire to construct a vast and lofty fabric? Think first about the foundations of humility. The higher your structure is to be, the deeper must be its foundation.”

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“It was pride that changed angels into devils; it is humility that makes men as angels.”

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“Pray as though everything depended on God. Work as though everything depended on you.”

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“Since love grows within you, so beauty grows. For love is the beauty of the soul.”

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“He that is jealous is not in love.”

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“Men go abroad to wonder at the heights of mountains, at the huge waves of the sea, at the long courses of the rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motions of the stars, and they pass by themselves without wondering.”

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“Patience is the companion of wisdom.”

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“God had one son on earth without sin, but never one without suffering.”

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“Love is the beauty of the soul.”

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“What does love look like? It has the hands to help others. It has the feet to hasten to the poor and needy. It has eyes to see misery and want. It has the ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of men. That is what love looks like.”

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“Humility is the foundation of all the other virtues hence, in the soul in which this virtue does not exist there cannot be any other virtue except in mere appearance.”

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“God judged it better to bring good out of evil than to suffer no evil to exist.”

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“He that is kind is free, though he is a slave; he that is evil is a slave, though he be a king.”‘

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“This is the very perfection of a man, to find out his own imperfections.”

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“If we did not have rational souls, we would not be able to believe.”

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“If we live good lives, the times are also good. As we are, such are the times.”

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“To seek the highest good is to live well.”

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“It seems to me that an unjust law is no law at all.”

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“You aspire to great things? Begin with little ones.”

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“The mind commands the body and is instantly obeyed. The mind commands itself and meets resistance.”

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“I will plant my feet on that step where my parents put me as a child, until self-evident truth comes to light.”

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“Hope has two beautiful daughters. Their names are anger and courage; anger at the way things are, and courage to see that they do not remain the way they are.”

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“To wisdom belongs the intellectual apprehension of things eternal; to knowledge, the rational apprehension of things temporal.”

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“You wish to be great, begin from the least. You are thinking to construct some mighty fabric in height; first think of the foundation of humility. And how great soever a mass of building one may wish and design to place above it, the greater the building is to be, the deeper does he dig his foundation.”

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“I have read in Plato and Cicero sayings that are very wise and very beautiful; but I never read in either of them, “Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden.””

Wikipedia:  Saint Augustine

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, April 11, 2020 – Willie Mays

WillieMays777

“Baseball is a game, yes. It is also a business. But what is most truly is is disguised combat. For all its gentility, its almost leisurely pace, baseball is violence under wraps.”

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“If you can do that – if you run, hit, run the bases, hit with power, field, throw and do all other things that are part of the game – then you’re a good ballplayer.”

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“In order to excel, you must be completely dedicated to your chosen sport. You must also be prepared to work hard and be willing to accept constructive criticism. Without one-hundred percent dedication, you won’t be able to do this.”

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“They throw the ball, I hit it. They hit the ball, I catch it.”

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“Every time I look at my pocketbook, I see Jackie Robinson.”

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“If you can do that – if you run, hit, run the bases, hit with power, field, throw and do all other things that are part of the game – then you’re a good ballplayer.”

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“It’s not hard. When I’m not hitting, I don’t hit nobody. But when I’m hitting, I hit anybody.”

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“At ten I was playing against 18-year-old guys. At 15 I was playing professional ball with the Birmingham Black Barons, so I really came very quickly in all sports.”

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“In 1950, when the Giants signed me, they gave me $15,000. I bought a 1950 Mercury. I couldn’t drive, but I had it in the parking lot there, and everybody that could drive would drive the car. So it was like a community thing.”

Wikipedia Page: Willie Mays

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, April 10, 2020 – Jack Kemp

We miss you Jack!

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“Democracy without morality is impossible.”

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“Every time in this century we’ve lowered the tax rates across the board, on employment, on saving, investment and risk-taking in this economy, revenues went up, not down.”

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“Republicans many times can’t get the words ‘equality of opportunity’ out of their mouths. Their lips do not form that way.”

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“There are no limits to our future if we don’t put limits on our people.”

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“There is a kind of victory in good work, no matter how humble.”

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“When people lack jobs, opportunity, and ownership of property they have little or no stake in their communities.”

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“Winning is like shaving – you do it every day or you wind up looking like a bum.”

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“Democracy is not a mathematical deduction proved once and for all time. Democracy is a just faith fervently held, commitment to be tested again and again in the fiery furnace of history.”

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“Pro football gave me a good perspective. When I entered the political arena, I had already been booed, cheered, cut, sold, traded, and hung in effigy.”

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“We have a chance to bring freedom to all of Asia, including China, and we should pursue it with a very positive engagement proposal of trade and strict adherence to human rights,”

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“When people lack jobs, opportunity, and ownership of property they have little or no stake in their communities.”

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“In 1984, Mario Cuomo of New York electrified the Democratic Convention with his tale of America as two cities, one rich and one poor, permanently divided into two classes. He talked about the rich growing richer and the poor becoming poorer, with the conclusion that class conflict, if not warfare, was the only result, and redistribution of wealth the solution.

With all due respect to Gov. Cuomo, he got it wrong. America is not divided immutably into two static classes. But it is separated or divided into two economies. One economy — our mainstream economy — is democratic and capitalist, market-oriented and entrepreneurial. It offers incentives for working families in labor and management. This mainstream economy rewards work, investment, saving and productivity. Incentives abound for productive economic and social behavior.

It was this economy, triggered by President Reagan’s supply-side revolution of tax cuts in 1981 that generated 21.5 million new jobs, more than four million new businesses, relatively low inflation and higher standards of living for most people. This economy has created more jobs in the past decade than all of Europe, Canada and Japan combined. And according to the U.S. Treasury, federal income taxes paid by the top 1% of taxpayers has surged by more than 80% to $92 billion in 1987 from $51 billion in 1981.

There is another economy — a second economy that is similar in respects to the East European or Third World socialist economies. It functions in a fashion opposite to the mainstream capitalist economy. It predominates in the pockets of poverty throughout urban and rural America. This economy has barriers to productive human and social activity and a virtual absence of economic incentives and rewards. It denies black, Hispanic and other minority men and women entry into the mainstream. This economy works almost as effectively as did hiring notices 50 years ago that read “No Blacks — or Hispanics or Irish or whatever — Need Apply.”

The irony is that the second economy was born of desire to help the poor, alleviate suffering, and provide a basic social safety net. The results were a counterproductive economy. Instead of independence, the second economy led to dependence. In an effort to minimize economic pain, it maximized welfare bureaucracy and social costs.” Wall Street Journal, June 12, 1990 – Jack Kemp in His Own Words, Wall Street Journal

Wikipedia:  Jack Kemp

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, April 9, 2020 – William James

WilliamJames7383

“A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and life is after all a chain.”

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“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

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“Acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcoming the consequences of any misfortune.”

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“Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.”

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“Action may not bring happiness but there is no happiness without action.”

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“An idea, to be suggestive, must come to the individual with the force of revelation.”

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“Belief creates the actual fact.”

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“Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

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“Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing.”

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“Compared to what we ought to be, we are half awake.”

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“Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.”

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“Do something everyday for no other reason than you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test.”

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“Every man who possibly can should force himself to a holiday of a full month in a year, whether he feels like taking it or not.”

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“Everybody should do at least two things each day that he hates to do, just for practice.”

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“Faith means belief in something concerning which doubt is theoretically possible.”

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“Genius… means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way.”

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“How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure.”

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“Human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind.”

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“I don’t sing because I’m happy; I’m happy because I sing.”

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“If merely ‘feeling good’ could decide, drunkenness would be the supremely valid human experience.”

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“If you care enough for a result, you will most certainly attain it.”

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“If you want a quality, act as if you already had it.”

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“Is life worth living? It all depends on the liver.”

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“It is only by risking our persons from one hour to another that we live at all. And often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true.”

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“Most people never run far enough on their first wind to find out they’ve got a second.”

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“The aim of a college education is to teach you to know a good man when you see one.”

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“The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.”

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“The best argument I know for an immortal life is the existence of a man who deserves one.”

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“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”

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“The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.”

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“The world is all the richer for having a devil in it, so long as we keep our foot upon his neck.”

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“These then are my last words to you. Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

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“To change ones life: Start immediately. Do it flamboyantly.”

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“We are all ready to be savage in some cause. The difference between a good man and a bad one is the choice of the cause.”

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“We don’t laugh because we’re happy – we’re happy because we laugh.”

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“Whenever you’re in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is “attitude.”

Wikipedia Page: William James

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, March 8, 2020 – William Tecumseh Sherman

“An Army is a collection of armed men obliged to obey one man. Every change in the rules which impairs the principle weakens the army.”

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“An army to be useful must be a unit, and out of this has grown the saying, attributed to Napoleon, but doubtless spoken before the days of Alexander, that an army with an inefficient commander was better than one with two able heads.”

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“Courage – a perfect sensibility of the measure of danger, and a mental willingness to endure it.”

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“I am tired and sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine. It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, for vengeance, for desolation. War is hell.”

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“I hate newspapermen. They come into camp and pick up their camp rumors and print them as facts. I regard them as spies, which, in truth, they are.”

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“If I had my choice I would kill every reporter in the world but I am sure we would be getting reports from hell before breakfast.”

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“I make up my opinions from facts and reasoning, and not to suit any body but myself. If people don’t like my opinions, it makes little difference as I don’t solicit their opinions or votes.”

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“In our Country… one class of men makes war and leaves another to fight it out.”

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“It’s a disagreeable thing to be whipped.”

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“My aim, then, was to whip the rebels, to humble their pride, to follow them to their inmost recesses, and make them fear and dread us. Fear is the beginning of wisdom.”

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“If nominated, I will not run; if elected, I will not serve.”

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“I think I understand what military fame is; to be killed on the field of battle and have your name misspelled in the newspapers.”

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“War is cruelty. There is no use trying to reform it. The crueler it is, the sooner it will be over.”

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“Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster.”

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“Grant stood by me when I was crazy, and I stood by him when he was drunk, and now we stand by each other.”

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“War is the remedy that our enemies have chosen, and I say let us give them all they want.”

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“I know I had no hand in making this war, and I know I will make more sacrifices today than any of you to secure peace.”

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“There will soon come an armed contest between capital and labor. They will oppose each other, not with words and arguments, but with shot and shell, gun-powder and cannon. The better classes are tired of the insane howling of the lower strata and they mean to stop them.”

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“There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell.”

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“I beg to present you as a Christmas gift the city of Savannah.”

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“If the people raise a great howl against my barbarity and cruelty, I will answer that war is war, and not popularity seeking.”

Wikipedia: William Tecumseh Sherman

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, April 7, 2020 – Omar Bradley

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“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

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“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

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“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

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“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

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“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

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“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

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“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

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“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

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“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

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Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

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An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, April 6, 2020 – Ernest Hemingway

“Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.”

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“I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen.”

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“Somebody just back of you while you are fishing is as bad as someone looking over your shoulder while you write a letter to your girl.”

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“When I have an idea, I turn down the flame, as if it were a little alcohol stove, as low as it will go. Then it explodes and that is my idea.”

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“Forget your personal tragedy. We are all bitched from the start and you especially have to be hurt like hell before you can write seriously. But when you get the damned hurt use it — don’t cheat with it.”

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“The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” A Farewell to Arms

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“If we win here we will win everywhere. The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

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“Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today. It’s been that way all this year. It’s been that way so many times. All of war is that way.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

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“Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.” The Old Man and the Sea

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“Write me at the Hotel Quintana, Pamplona, Spain. Or don’t you like to write letters. I do because it’s such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you’ve done something” Letter to F. Scott Fitzgerald, July 1, 1925

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“I’ve tried to reduce profanity but I reduced so much profanity when writing the book that I’m afraid not much could come out. Perhaps we will have to consider it simply as a profane book and hope that the next book will be less profane or perhaps more sacred.” About his book, The Sun Also Rises in a letter, August 21, 1926

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“Grace under pressure.”

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“I’ve been in love (truly) with five women, the Spanish Republic and the 4th Infantry Division.” Letter to Marlene Dietrich, July 1, 1930

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“All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn… American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.”

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“However you make your living is where your talent lies.”

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“Ezra was right half the time, and when he was wrong, he was so wrong you were never in any doubt about it.” On Ezra Pound, as quoted in The New Republic, November 11, 1936

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“All my life I’ve looked at words as though I were seeing them for the first time.”

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“There’s no one thing that’s true. It’s all true.”

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“Never confuse movement with action.”

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“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”

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“Hesitation increases in relation to risk in equal proportion to age.”

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“The individual, the great artist when he comes, uses everything that has been discovered or known about his art up to that point, being able to accept or reject in a time so short it seems that the knowledge was born with him, rather than that he takes instantly what it takes the ordinary man a lifetime to know, and then the great artist goes beyond what has been done or known and makes something of his own.” Death in the Afternoon

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“There are some things which cannot be learned quickly, and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring. They are the very simplest things and because it takes a man’s life to know them the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave.” Death in the Afternoon

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“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”

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“The first and final thing you have to do in this world is to last it and not be smashed by it.”

And

“There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now, and if now is only two days, then two days is your life and everything in it will be in proportion. This is how you live a life in two days. And if you stop complaining and asking for what you never will get, you will have a good life. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

Wikipedia: Ernest Hemingway

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, April 5, 2020 – Joseph Campbell

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“A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.”

And

“Find a place inside where there’s joy, and the joy will burn out the pain.”

And

“Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.”

And

“I don’t believe people are looking for the meaning of life as much as they are looking for the experience of being alive.”

And

“Is the system going to flatten you out and deny you your humanity, or are you going to be able to make use of the system to the attainment of human purposes?”

And

“It is by going down into the abyss that we recover the treasures of life. Where you stumble, there lies your treasure.”

And

“Life is without meaning. You bring the meaning to it. The meaning of life is whatever you ascribe it to be. Being alive is the meaning.”

And

“Opportunities to find deeper powers within ourselves come when life seems most challenging.”

And

“The big question is whether you are going to be able to say a hearty yes to your adventure.”

And

“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature.”

And

“The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.”

And

“We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us.”

And

“When we quit thinking primarily about ourselves and our own self-preservation, we undergo a truly heroic transformation of consciousness.”

And

“When you make the sacrifice in marriage, you’re sacrificing not to each other but to unity in a relationship.”

And

“Your life is the fruit of your own doing. You have no one to blame but yourself.”

And

“Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.”

And

“It’s only when a man tames his own demons that he becomes the king of himself if not of the world.”

And

“The achievement of the hero is one that he is ready for and it’s really a manifestation of his character.”

And

“People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our life experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonance within our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive. That’s what it’s all finally about.”

And

“One thing that comes out in myths is that at the bottom of the abyss comes the voice of salvation. The black moment is the moment when the real message of transformation is going to come. At the darkest moment comes the light.”

And

“The way to find out about your happiness is to keep your mind on those moments when you feel most happy, when you really are happy-not excited, not just thrilled, but deeply happy. This requires a little bit of self analysis. What is it that makes you happy? Stay with it, no matter what people tell you. This is what I call “following your bliss.”

And

“The happy ending of the fairy tale, the myth, and the divine comedy of the soul, is to be read, not as a contradiction, but as a transcendence of the universal tragedy of man. …Tragedy is the shattering of the forms and of our attachment to the forms… the two are the terms of a single mythological theme… the down-going and the up-coming (kathados and anodos), which together constitute the totality of the revelation that is life, and which the individual must know and love if he is to be purged (katharsis=purgatorio) of the contagion of sin (disobedience to the divine will) and death (identification with the mortal form). “All things are changing; nothing dies…”

And

“Eternity isn’t some later time. Eternity isn’t a long time. Eternity has nothing to do with time. Eternity is that dimension of here and now which thinking and time cuts out. This is it. And if you don’t get it here, you won’t get it anywhere. And the experience of eternity right here and now is the function of life. There’s a wonderful formula that the Buddhists have for the Bodhisattva, the one whose being (sattva) is illumination (bodhi), who realizes his identity with eternity and at the same time his participation in time. And the attitude is not to withdraw from the world when you realize how horrible it is, but to realize that this horror is simply the foreground of a wonder and to come back and participate in it. “All life is sorrowful” is the first Buddhist saying, and it is. It wouldn’t be life if there were not temporality involved which is sorrow. Loss, loss, loss.”

And

“Follow your bliss.”

And

“Bill Moyers: Unlike heroes such as Prometheus or Jesus, we’re not going on our journey to save the world but to save ourselves.
Joseph Campbell: But in doing that you save the world. The influence of a vital person vitalizes, there’s no doubt about it. The world without spirit is a wasteland. People have the notion of saving the world by shifting things around, changing the rules, and who’s on top, and so forth. No, no! Any world is a valid world if it’s alive. The thing to do is to bring life to it, and the only way to do that is to find in your own case where the life is and become alive yourself.”

And

“Marx teaches us to blame society for our frailties, Freud teaches us to blame our parents, and astrology teaches us to blame the universe. The only place to look for blame is within: you didn’t have the guts to bring up your full moon and live the life that was your potential.”

Wikipedia:  Joseph Campbell

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