COACHES HOT SEAT

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, July 6, 2016 – Neil Armstrong

 

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“I believe every human has a finite number of heartbeats. I don’t intend to waste any of mine.”

And

“I guess we all like to be recognized not for one piece of fireworks, but for the ledger of our daily work.”

And

“It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

And

“I think we’re going to the moon because it’s in the nature of the human being to face challenges. It’s by the nature of his deep inner soul… we’re required to do these things just as salmon swim upstream.”

And

“The important achievement of Apollo was demonstrating that humanity is not forever chained to this planet and our visions go rather further than that and our opportunities are unlimited.”

And

“This is one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

And

“Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed.”

And

“As a boy, because I was born and raised in Ohio, about 60 miles north of Dayton, the legends of the Wrights have been in my memories as long as I can remember.”

And

“There can be no great accomplishment without risk.”

Wikipedia: Neil Armstrong

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, July 5, 2016 – Frederick Douglass

 

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“A man’s character always takes its hue, more or less, from the form and color of things about him.”

And

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.”

And

“Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have the exact measure of the injustice and wrong which will be imposed on them.”

And

“I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence.”

And

“I am a Republican, a black, dyed in the wool Republican, and I never intend to belong to any other party than the party of freedom and progress.”

And

“A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.”

And

“One and God make a majority.”

And

“I didn’t know I was a slave until I found out I couldn’t do the things I wanted.”

And

“The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppose.”

And

“A gentleman will not insult me, and no man not a gentleman can insult me.”

And

“To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker.”

And

“The life of the nation is secure only while the nation is honest, truthful, and virtuous.”

And

“A little learning, indeed, may be a dangerous thing, but the want of learning is a calamity to any people.”

And

“The white man’s happiness cannot be purchased by the black man’s misery.”

And

“Without a struggle, there can be no progress.”

And

“It is not light that we need, but fire; it is not the gentle shower, but thunder. We need the storm, the whirlwind, and the earthquake.”

And

“Man’s greatness consists in his ability to do and the proper application of his powers to things needed to be done.”

And

“People might not get all they work for in this world, but they must certainly work for all they get.”

And

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters. This struggle may be a moral one; or it may be a physical one; or it may be both moral and physical; but it must be a struggle. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what a people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. Men may not get all they pay for in this world; but they must pay for all they get. If we ever get free from all the oppressions and wrongs heaped upon us, we must pay for their removal. We must do this by labor, by suffering, by sacrifice, and, if needs be, by our lives, and the lives of others.”

And

“No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck.”

And

“Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.”

And

“Whatever the future may have in store for us, one thing is certain — this new revolution in human thought will never go backward. When a great truth once gets abroad in the world, no power on earth can imprison it, or prescribe its limits, or suppress it. It is bound to go on till it becomes the thought of the world. Such a truth is woman’s right to equal liberty with man. She was born with it. It was hers before she comprehended it. It is inscribed upon all the powers and faculties of her soul, and no custom, law, or usage can ever destroy it. Now that it has got fairly fixed in the minds of the few, it is bound to become fixed in the minds of the many, and be supported at last by a great cloud of witnesses, which no man can number and no power can withstand.”

And

“Mr. Lincoln was not only a great President, but a great man — too great to be small in anything. In his company I was never in any way reminded of my humble origin, or of my unpopular color.”

And

“I look upon my departure from Colonel Lloyd’s plantation as one of the most interesting events of my life. It is possible, and even quite probable, that but for the mere circumstance of being removed from that plantation to Baltimore, I should have to-day, instead of being here seated by my own table, in the enjoyment of freedom and the happiness of home, writing this Narrative, been confined in the galling chains of slavery. Going to live at Baltimore laid the foundation, and opened the gateway, to all my subsequent prosperity. I have ever regarded it as the first plain manifestation of that kind providence which has ever since attended me, and marked my life with so many favors. I regarded the selection of myself as being somewhat remarkable. There were a number of slave children that might have been sent from the plantation to Baltimore. There were those younger, those older, and those of the same age. I was chosen from among them all, and was the first, last, and only choice.”

Wikipedia Page: Frederick Douglass

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, July 4, 2016 – Thomas Jefferson

 

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“In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.”

Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, July 4, 1776

And

“A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circlue of
our felicities.”

And

“Advertisements contain the only truths to be relied on in a newspaper.”

And

“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.”

And

“All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression.”

And

“Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.”

And

“As our enemies have found we can reason like men, so now let us show them we can fight like men also.”

And

“Be polite to all, but intimate with few.”

And

“Books constitute capital. A library book lasts as long as a house, for hundreds of years. It is not, then, an article of mere consumption but fairly of capital, and often in the case of professional men, setting out in life, it is their only capital.”

And

“Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing.”

And

“Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.”

And

“Educate and inform the whole mass of the people… They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty.”

And

“Every citizen should be a soldier. This was the case with the Greeks and Romans, and must be that of every free state.”

And

“Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves are its only safe depositories.”

And

“Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.”

And

“Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, he must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.”

And

“For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well-organized and armed militia is their best security.”

And

“I am an Epicurean. I consider the genuine (not the imputed) doctrines of Epicurus as containing everything rational in moral philosophy which Greek and Roman leave to us.”

And

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.”

And

“I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

And

“I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be.”

And

“I know of no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is not to take it from them but to inform their discretion.”

And

“I own that I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive.”

And

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”

And

“I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.”

And

“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.”

And

“In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.”

And

“It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.”

And

It is our duty still to endeavor to avoid war; but if it shall actually take place, no matter by whom brought on, we must defend ourselves. If our house be on fire, “without inquiring whether it was fired from within or without, we must try to extinguish it.”

And

“Leave all the afternoon for exercise and recreation, which are as necessary as reading. I will rather say more necessary because health is worth more than learning.”

And

“Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.”

And

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.”

And

“Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today.”

And

“Never spend your money before you have earned it.”

And

“Nothing is unchangeable but the inherent and unalienable rights of man.”

And

“Our greatest happiness does not depend on the condition of life in which chance has placed us, but is always the result of a good conscience, good health, occupation, and freedom in all just pursuits.”

And

“The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only object of good government.”

And

“The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time; the hand of force may destroy, but cannot disjoin them.”

And

“There is not a truth existing which I fear… or would wish unknown to the whole world.”

And

“We never repent of having eaten too little.”

And

“When a man assumes a public trust he should consider himself a public property.”

And

“When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. When the government fears the people, there is liberty.”

And

“When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe.”

And

“Whenever a man has cast a longing eye on offices, a rottenness begins in his conduct.”

And

“Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.”

And

“Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.”

And

“The most fortunate of us, in our journey through life, frequently meet with calamities and misfortunes which may greatly afflict us; and, to fortify our minds against the attacks of these calamities and misfortunes, should be one of the principal studies and endeavours of our lives. The only method of doing this is to assume a perfect resignation to the Divine will, to consider that whatever does happen, must happen; and that by our uneasiness, we cannot prevent the blow before it does fall, but we may add to its force after it has fallen. These considerations, and others such as these, may enable us in some measure to surmount the difficulties thrown in our way; to bear up with a tolerable degree of patience under this burthen of life; and to proceed with a pious and unshaken resignation, till we arrive at our journey’s end, when we may deliver up our trust into the hands of him who gave it, and receive such reward as to him shall seem proportioned to our merit. Such, dear Page, will be the language of the man who considers his situation in this life, and such should be the language of every man who would wish to render that situation as easy as the nature of it will admit. Few things will disturb him at all: nothing will disturb him much.” Letter to John Page (15 July 1763)

And

“All persons shall have full and free liberty of religious opinion; nor shall any be compelled to frequent or maintain any religious institution.”

And

“I say, the earth belongs to each of these generations during its course, fully and in its own right. The second generation receives it clear of the debts and incumbrances of the first, the third of the second, and so on. For if the first could charge it with a debt, then the earth would belong to the dead and not to the living generation. Then, no generation can contract debts greater than may be paid during the course of its own existence.”

And

“I consider the foundation of the Constitution as laid on this ground: That “all powers not delegated to the United States, by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States or to the people.” To take a single step beyond the boundaries thus specially drawn around the powers of Congress, is to take
possession of a boundless field of power, no longer susceptible of any definition.

The incorporation of a bank, and the powers assumed by this bill, have not, in my opinion, been delegated to the United States, by the Constitution… They are not among the powers specially enumerated…” Opinion against the constitutionality of a National Bank (1791)

And

“The system of banking we have both equally and ever reprobated. I contemplate it as a blot left in all our Constitutions, which, if not covered, will end in their destruction, which is already hit by the gamblers in corruption, and is sweeping away in its progress the fortunes and morals of our citizens. Funding I consider as
limited, rightfully, to a redemption of the debt within the lives of a majority of the generation contracting it; every generation coming equally, by the laws of the Creator of the world, to the free possession of the earth he made for their subsistence, unincumbered by their predecessors, who, like them, were but tenants for life.”
Letter to John Taylor (28 May 1816)

And

“A Decalogue of Canons for Observation in Practical Life”
1. Never put off till to-morrow what you can do to-day.
2. Never trouble another for what you can do yourself.
3. Never spend your money before you have it.
4. Never buy what you do not want, because it is cheap; it will be dear to you.
5. Pride costs us more than hunger, thirst and cold.
6. We never repent of having eaten too little.
7. Nothing is troublesome that we do willingly.
8. How much pain have cost us the evils which have never happened.
9. Take things always by their smooth handle.
10. When angry, count ten before you speak; if very angry, an hundred.”

Wikipedia Page:  Thomas Jefferson

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, July 3, 2016 – Thomas Paine

 

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A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.

And

“Character is much easier kept than recovered.”

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“Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.”

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“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”

And

“I prefer peace. But if trouble must come, let it come in my time, so that my children can live in peace.”

And

“One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.”

And

“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best stage, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.”

And

“That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly.”

And

“There are two distinct classes of what are called thoughts: those that we produce in ourselves by reflection and the act of thinking and those that bolt into the mind of their own accord.”

And

“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

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“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.”

And

“We have it in our power to begin the world over again.”

And

“We have every opportunity and every encouragement before us, to form the noblest purest constitution on the face of the earth. We have it in our power to begin the world over again. A situation, similar to the present, hath not happened since the days of Noah until now. The birthday of a new world is at hand, and a race of men, perhaps as numerous as all Europe contains, are to receive their portion of freedom from the event of a few months.” Common Sense, 1776

And

“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of man change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it.” The Rights of Man, 1791

And

“It is the nature and intention of a constitution to prevent governing by party, by establishing a common principle that shall limit and control the power and impulse of party, and that says to all parties, thus far shalt thou go and no further. But in the absence of a constitution, men look entirely to party; and instead of principle governing party, party governs principle.” First Principles of Government, 1795

And

“I never tire of reading Tom Paine.” Abraham Lincoln, as quoted in A Literary History of the American People, 1931

And

“I consider Paine our greatest political thinker. As we have not advanced, and perhaps never shall advance, beyond the Declaration and Constitution, so Paine has had no successors who extended his principles.” Thomas Alva Edison

Wikipedia: Thomas Paine

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, July 2, 2016 – John Adams

 

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“A desire to be observed, considered, esteemed, praised, beloved, and admired by his fellows is one of the earliest as well as the keenest dispositions discovered in the heart of man.”

And

“A government of laws, and not of men.”

And

“All the perplexities, confusion and distress in America arise, not from defects in their Constitution or Confederation, not from want of honor or virtue, so much as from the downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit and circulation.”

And

“Because power corrupts, society’s demands for moral authority and character increase as the importance of the position increases.”

And

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.”

And

“Great is the guilt of an unnecessary war.”

And

“I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in providence, for the illumination of the ignorant and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.”

And

“I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.”

And

“If we do not lay out ourselves in the service of mankind whom should we serve?”

And

“Let us tenderly and kindly cherish, therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write.”

And

“Liberty cannot be preserved without general knowledge among the people.”

And

“Old minds are like old horses; you must exercise them if you wish to keep them in working order.”

And

“Power always thinks… that it is doing God’s service when it is violating all his laws.”

And

“There are two educations. One should teach us how to make a living and the other how to live.”

And

“Tis impossible to judge with much Præcision of the true Motives and Qualities of human Actions, or of the Propriety of Rules contrived to govern them, without considering with like Attention, all the Passions, Appetites, Affections in Nature from which they flow. An intimate Knowledge therefore of the intellectual and moral World is the sole foundation on which a stable structure of Knowledge can be erected.”

And

“There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.”

And

“Yesterday the greatest question was decided which ever was debated in America; and a greater perhaps never was, nor will be, decided among men. A resolution was passed without one dissenting colony, “that these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States.”

And

“There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution.”

And

“The consequences arising from the continual accumulation of public debts in other countries ought to admonish us to be careful to prevent their growth in our own.”

And

“Our obligations to our country never cease but with our lives.”

And

“As to the history of the revolution, my ideas may be peculiar, perhaps singular. What do we mean by the Revolution? The war? That was no part of the revolution; it was only an effect and consequence of it. The revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected from 1760–1775, in the course of fifteen years, before a drop of blood was shed at Lexington.”

And

“Power always sincerely, conscientiously, de très bon foi, believes itself right. Power always thinks it has a great soul and vast views, beyond the comprehension of the weak.”

And

“Let the human mind loose. It must be loose. It will be loose. Superstition and dogmatism cannot confine it.”

And

“This is the most magnificent movement of all! There is a dignity, a majesty, a sublimity, in this last effort of the patriots that I greatly admire. The people should never rise without doing something to be remembered — something notable and striking. This destruction of the tea is so bold, so daring, so firm, intrepid and inflexible, and it must have so important consequences, and so lasting, that I can’t but consider it as an epocha in history!”
On the Boston Tea Party (17 December 1773)

And

“Children should be educated and instructed in the principles of freedom.”

And

Posterity! you will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom! I hope you will make a good use of it.” John Adams, Letters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife

Wikipedia: John Adams

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, July 1, 2016 – Ernest Hemingway

 

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“Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut.”

And

“I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen.”

And

“Somebody just back of you while you are fishing is as bad as someone looking over your shoulder while you write a letter to your girl.”

And

“When I have an idea, I turn down the flame, as if it were a little alcohol stove, as low as it will go. Then it explodes and that is my idea.”

And

“Forget your personal tragedy. We are all bitched from the start and you especially have to be hurt like hell before you can write seriously. But when you get the damned hurt use it — don’t cheat with it.”

And

“The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.” A Farewell to Arms

And

“If we win here we will win everywhere. The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

And

“Today is only one day in all the days that will ever be. But what will happen in all the other days that ever come can depend on what you do today. It’s been that way all this year. It’s been that way so many times. All of war is that way.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

And

“Man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.” The Old Man and the Sea

And

“Write me at the Hotel Quintana, Pamplona, Spain. Or don’t you like to write letters. I do because it’s such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you’ve done something” Letter to F. Scott Fitzgerald, July 1, 1925

And

“I’ve tried to reduce profanity but I reduced so much profanity when writing the book that I’m afraid not much could come out. Perhaps we will have to consider it simply as a profane book and hope that the next book will be less profane or perhaps more sacred.” About his book, The Sun Also Rises in a letter, August 21, 1926

And

“Grace under pressure.”

And

“I’ve been in love (truly) with five women, the Spanish Republic and the 4th Infantry Division.” Letter to Marlene Dietrich, July 1, 1930

And

“All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn… American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.”

And

“However you make your living is where your talent lies.”

And

“Ezra was right half the time, and when he was wrong, he was so wrong you were never in any doubt about it.” On Ezra Pound, as quoted in The New Republic, November 11, 1936

And

“All my life I’ve looked at words as though I were seeing them for the first time.”

And

“There’s no one thing that’s true. It’s all true.”

And

“Never confuse movement with action.”

And

“If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”

And

“Hesitation increases in relation to risk in equal proportion to age.”

And

“The individual, the great artist when he comes, uses everything that has been discovered or known about his art up to that point, being able to accept or reject in a time so short it seems that the knowledge was born with him, rather than that he takes instantly what it takes the ordinary man a lifetime to know, and then the great artist goes beyond what has been done or known and makes something of his own.” Death in the Afternoon

And

“There are some things which cannot be learned quickly, and time, which is all we have, must be paid heavily for their acquiring. They are the very simplest things and because it takes a man’s life to know them the little new that each man gets from life is very costly and the only heritage he has to leave.” Death in the Afternoon

And

“It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.”

And

“The first and final thing you have to do in this world is to last it and not be smashed by it.”

And

“There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now, and if now is only two days, then two days is your life and everything in it will be in proportion. This is how you live a life in two days. And if you stop complaining and asking for what you never will get, you will have a good life. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.” For Whom the Bell Tolls

Wikipedia: Ernest Hemingway

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, June 30, 2016 – F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

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“A big man has no time really to do anything but just sit and be big.”

And

“Action is character.”

And

“Advertising is a racket, like the movies and the brokerage business. You cannot be honest without admitting that its constructive contribution to humanity is exactly minus zero.”

And

“An author ought to write for the youth of his own generation, the critics of the next, and the schoolmaster of ever afterwards.”

And

“Either you think, or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.”

And

“Every one suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues.”

And

“First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.”

And

“Genius is the ability to put into effect what is on your mind.”

And

“I like people and I like them to like me, but I wear my heart where God put it, on the inside.”

And

“Life is essentially a cheat and its conditions are those of defeat; the redeeming things are not happiness and pleasure but the deeper satisfactions that come out of struggle.”

And

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

And

“Scratch a Yale man with both hands and you’ll be lucky to find a coast-guard. Usually you find nothing at all.”

And

“Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy.”

And

“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“You don’t write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.”

And

“Once one is caught up into the material world not one person in ten thousand finds the time to form literary taste, to examine the validity of philosophic concepts for himself, or to form what, for lack of a better phrase, I might call the wise and tragic sense of life.”

Amd

“Isn’t Hollywood a dump — in the human sense of the word. A hideous town, pointed up by the insulting gardens of its rich, full of the human spirit at a new low of debasement.”

And

“Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them, makes them soft, where we are hard, cynical where we are trustful, in a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to understand.”

And

“There are no second acts in American lives.”

And

“Before I go on with this short history, let me make a general observation – the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise. This philosophy fitted on to my early adult life, when I saw the improbable, the implausible, often the “impossible,” come true.”

And

“All good writing is swimming under water and holding your breath.

And

“My generation of radicals and breakers-down never found anything to take the place of the old virtues of work and courage and the old graces of courtesy and politeness.”

And

“Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy.”

And

“On the last night, with my trunk packed and my car sold to the grocer, I went over and looked at that huge incoherent failure of a house once more. On the white steps an obscene word, scrawled by some boy with a piece of brick, stood out clearly in the moonlight, and I erased it, drawing my shoe raspingly along the stone. Then I wandered down to the beach and sprawled out on the sand.

Most of the big shore places were closed now and there were hardly any lights except the shadowy, moving glow of a ferryboat across the Sound. And as the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes—a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And one fine morning——

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” The Ending of The Great Gatsby, 1925

Wikipedia:  F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, June 29, 2016 – James Madison

 

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“The circulation of confidence is better than the circulation of money.”

And

“The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.”

And

“Liberty may be endangered by the abuse of liberty, but also by the abuse of power.”

And

“If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.”

And

“The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse.”

And

“Philosophy is common sense with big words.”

And

“America was indebted to immigration for her settlement and prosperity. That part of America which had encouraged them most had advanced most rapidly in population, agriculture and the arts.”

And

“A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, trained in arms, is the best most natural defense of a free country.”

And

“A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both.”

And

“Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

And

“The purpose of separation of church and state is to keep forever from these shores the ceaseless strife that has soaked the soil of Europe with blood for centuries.”

And

“If men were angels, no government would be necessary.”

And

“What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary.”

And

“The truth is that all men having power ought to be mistrusted.”

And

“In Republics, the great danger is, that the majority may not sufficiently respect the rights of the minority. “
And

“Let me recommend the best medicine in the world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant country, in easy stages.”

And

“The people are the only legitimate fountain of power, and it is from them that the constitutional charter, under which the several branches of government hold their power, is derived.”

And

“The happy Union of these States is a wonder; their Constitution a miracle; their example the hope of Liberty throughout the world.”

And

“No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”

And

“Wherever there is interest and power to do wrong, wrong will generally be done.”

And

“War should only be declared by the authority of the people, whose toils and treasures are to support its burdens, instead of the government which is to reap its fruits.”

And

“To suppose that any form of government will secure liberty or happiness without any virtue in the people, is a chimerical idea.”

And

“What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual and surest support?”

And

“There is no maxim, in my opinion, which is more liable to be misapplied, and which, therefore, more needs elucidation, than the current one, that the interest of the majority is the political standard of right and wrong.”

And

“Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended, from abroad.”

And

“The personal right to acquire property, which is a natural right, gives to property, when acquired, a right to protection, as a social right.”

And

“The man who is possessed of wealth, who lolls on his sofa or rolls in his carriage, cannot judge the wants or feelings of the day-laborer. The government we mean to erect is intended to last for ages. The landed interest, at present, is prevalent; but in process of time, when we approximate to the states and kingdoms of Europe, — when the number of landholders shall be comparatively small, through the various means of trade and manufactures, will not the landed interest be overbalanced in future elections, and unless wisely provided against, what will become of your government? In England, at this day, if elections were open to all classes of people, the property of landed proprietors would be insecure. An agrarian law would soon take place. If these observations be just, our government ought to secure the permanent interests of the country against innovation. Landholders ought to have a share in the government, to support these invaluable interests, and to balance and check the other. They ought to be so constituted as to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority. The senate, therefore, ought to be this body; and to answer these purposes, they ought to have permanency and stability.”

And

“In time of actual war, great discretionary powers are constantly given to the Executive Magistrate. Constant apprehension of War, has the same tendency to render the head too large for the body. A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty. The means of defence against foreign danger have been always the instruments of tyranny at home. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people.”

And

“Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression. In our Governments, the real power lies in the majority of the Community, and the invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from the acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the constituents.”

Wikipedia Page:  James Madison

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 28, 2016 – Albert Camus

 

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“Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend.”

And

“Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear.”

And

“The evil that is in the world almost always comes of ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

And

“But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”

And

“Without culture, and the relative freedom it implies, society, even when perfect, is but a jungle. This is why any authentic creation is a gift to the future.”

And

“All great deeds and all great thoughts have a ridiculous beginning. Great works are often born on a street corner or in a restaurant’s revolving door.”

And

“Truth is mysterious, elusive, always to be conquered. Liberty is dangerous, as hard to live with as it is elating. We must march toward these two goals, painfully but resolutely, certain in advance of our failings on so long a road.”

And

“The absurd is the essential concept and the first truth.”

And

“The struggle itself towards the heights is enough to fill a man’s heart. One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”

And

“Those who lack the courage will always find a philosophy to justify it.”

And

“Real generosity toward the future lies in giving all to the present.”

And

“No cause justifies the deaths of innocent people.”

And

“Basically, at the very bottom of life, which seduces us all, there is only absurdity, and more absurdity. And maybe that’s what gives us our joy for living, because the only thing that can defeat absurdity is lucidity.”

And

“For if there is a sin against life, it consists perhaps not so much in despairing of life as in hoping for another life and in eluding the implacable grandeur of this life.”

And

“You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.”

And

“Peace is the only battle worth waging.”

And

“There are causes worth dying for, but none worth killing for.”

And

“I know that man is capable of great deeds. But if he isn’t capable of great emotion, well, he leaves me cold.”

And

“The need to be right — the sign of a vulgar mind.”

And

“Seeking what is true is not seeking what is desirable.”

And

“People hasten to judge in order not to be judged themselves.”

And

“I would rather live my life as if there is a god and die to find out there isn’t, than live my life as if there isn’t and die to find out there is.”

And

“Life can be magnificent and overwhelming — that is the whole tragedy. Without beauty, love, or danger it would almost be easy to live. ”

And

“At the heart of all beauty lies something inhuman.”

And

“The evil that is in the world almost always comes from ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence if they lack understanding.”

And

“Freedom is nothing but a chance to be better.”

And

“There are crimes of passion and crimes of logic. The boundary between them is not clearly defined.”

And

“Where there is no hope, it is incumbent on us to invent it.”

And

“I rebel; therefore I exist.”

And

“Real generosity towards the future lies in giving all to the present.”

And

“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.”

And

“Beauty is unbearable, drives us to despair, offering us for a minute the glimpse of an eternity that we should like to stretch out over the whole of time.”

And

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer. And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger — something better, pushing right back.”

And

“There is scarcely any passion without struggle.”

And

“Should I kill myself, or have a cup of coffee?”

And

“But in the end one needs more courage to live than to kill himself.”

And

“Always go too far, because that’s where you’ll find the truth.”

And

“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.”

And

“The truth is that everyone is bored, and devotes himself to cultivating habits.”

And

“He who despairs of the human condition is a coward, but he who has hope for it is a fool.”

And

“The habit of despair is worse than despair itself.”

And

“But what is happiness except the simple harmony between a man and the life he leads?”

And

“My chief occupation, despite appearances, has always been love.”

And

“If absolute truth belongs to anyone in this world, it certainly does not belong to the man or party that claims to possess it.”

Wikipedia:  Albert Camus

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 27, 2016 – Pat Summitt

 

God Bless You Coach Pat Summitt!  Thank You for the Amazing Life You Have Lived!

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“Change equals self improvement. Push yourself to places you haven’t been before.”

And

“Class is more important than a game.”

And

“Combine practice with belief.”

And

“Competition got me off the farm and trained me to seek out challenges and to endure setbacks; and in combination with my faith, it sustains me now in my fight with Alzheimer’s disease.”

And

“Discipline helps you finish a job, and finishing is what separates excellent work from average work.”

And

“Everyone thinks we might curl up and die, both programs. I don’t think it’s going to happen, so put away your hankies.”

And

“God doesn’t take things away to be cruel. He takes things away to make room for other things. He takes things away to lighten us. He takes things away so we can fly.”

And

“Group discipline produces a unified effort toward a common goal.”

And

“Handle Success Like You Handle Failure. You can’t always control what happens, but you can control how you handle it.”

And

“I can remember trying to coach, trying to figure out schemes, and it just wasn’t coming to me.”

And

“I didn’t leave her there for long. When a player makes a mistake, you always want to put them back in quickly—you don’t just berate them and sit them down with no chance for redemption.”

And

“I didn’t say a lot. I didn’t throw anything. That’s not my style. I did think about it though.”

And

“I don’t give out compliments easily.”

And

“I don’t want to sit around the house. I want to be out there. I want to go to practice. I want to be in the huddles. That’s me.”

And

“I hate to sound this way but, ‘Why me? Why me with dementia?”‘

And

“I learned so much from Sue about the X’s and O’s of the game of basketball.”

And

“I think with the players who have been here, regardless of whether they’ve been in that No. 1 position, that’s what we’re always trying to be — the best team.”

And

“I won 1,098 games, and eight national championships, and coached in four different decades. But what I see are not the numbers. I see their faces.”

And

“I’d wake up in the morning and I would think, ‘Where am I?’ I’d have to gather myself.”

And

“If it doesn’t bother you, it won’t bother them.”

And

“If you want to be in the game you better shoot 75% from the line.”

And

“I’m interested to see where a combination of faith and science will take me.”

And

“In the absence of feedback, people will fill in the blanks with a negative. They will assume you don’t care about them or don’t like them.”

And

“It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts the most.”

And

“It’s harder to stay on top than it is to make the climb, Continue to seek new goals.”

And

“I’ve got a great staff and great support system, and I’m going to stick my neck out and do what I always do.”

And

“Kay very calmly and sweetly said, “You know, Pat, how much better do you think Lea Henry and Cindy Noble are going to get at this point?” She was saying ease up—it’s enough. I had reached
the point of diminishing returns. “I think they are both trying really hard to please you, but how much more can they possibly do?” she said. “I just wonder if you’ve really thought about that.’”

And

“Know your strengths, weaknesses, and needs.”

And

“Losing the way we lost is unacceptable in this program. We will learn from it.”

And

“Make Winning an Attitude.”

And

“Most people get excited about games, but I’ve got to be excited about practice, because that’s my classroom.”

And

“Obviously, this was a tough battle for both teams. A great basketball game I’m sure to watch, a challenging one to play in and coach.”

And

“Our philosophy has always been you better pack your defense and your board work on the road. Because those ugly nights and those poor shooting nights — you just have to grind games out.
Today, we just had to grind it out.”

And

“Our team respects Texas. They have beaten us four in a row and beat us by 10 last year in Knoxville. We were not surprised.”

And

“Parker has been handling the ball and bringing it up the floor, running some point as well. Ideally we’d like her closer to the basket, but it’s not like she has to stay on the perimeter.”

And

“Rebounding wins championships, you need to emphasize it and work with kids on it.”

And

“See yourself as self employed.”

And

“Silence is a form of communication, too. Sometimes less is more.”

And

“Sit up straight, listen and participate.”

And

“Someday, I suppose I’ll give up, and sit in the rocking chair. But I’ll probably be rocking fast, because I don’t know what I’ll do without a job.”

And

“Teamwork doesn’t come naturally. It must be taught.”

And

“There is an old saying: a champion is someone who is willing to be uncomfortable.”

And

“We feel like we get everybody’s best shot because we’re Tennessee, but we have to learn how to give everybody our best shot.”

And

“What this tells me is that facts are only the smallest components of memory.”

And

“When she took off, I thought she’s going to try to dunk the ball. I was good with it. I thought she just committed to it a little too early.”

And

“When you grow up on a dairy farm, cows don’t take a day off. So you work every day and my dad always said, ‘No one can outwork you.’”

And

“You have to make shots. That’s the bottom line.”

Wikipedia:  Pat Summitt

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