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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, November 7, 2012 – Benjamin Franklin

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, November 7, 2012 – Benjamin Franklin

Remarks of Benjamin Franklin after the signing of the US Constitution on September 17, 1787 in the words of James Madison:

“Whilst the last members were signing it Doctor Franklin looking towards the Presidents Chair, at the back of which a rising sun happened to be painted, observed to a few members near him, that Painters had found it difficult to distinguish in their art a rising from a setting sun. I have, said he, often and often in the course of the Session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting: But now at length I have the happiness to know that it is a rising and not a setting Sun.”

And

“All mankind is divided into three classes: those that are immovable, those that are movable, and those that move.”

And

“Do not fear mistakes.  You will know failure.  Continue to reach out.”

And

“Do not squander time for that is the stuff life is made of.”

And

“Hide not your talents.  They for use were made.  What’s a sundial in the shade?”

And

“Tell me and I forget.  Teach me and I remember.  Involve me and I learn.”

And

“The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness.  You have to catch it yourself.”

And

“A great empire, like a great cake, is most easily diminished at the edges.”

And

“Be at war with your vices, at peace with your neighbors, and let every new year find you a better man.”

And

“Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn.”

And

“Energy and persistence conquer all things.”

And

“How few there are who have courage enough to own their faults, or resolution enough to mend them.”

And

“It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.”

And

“We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.”

And

“When you’re finished changing, you’re finished.”

And

“Where liberty is, there is my country.”

And

“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning.”

And

“I believe there is one Supreme most perfect being. … I believe He is pleased and delights in the happiness of those He has created; and since without virtue man can have no happiness in this world, I firmly believe He delights to see me virtuous.”

And

“I think opinions should be judged of by their influences and effects, and if a man holds none that tend to make him less virtuous or more vicious, it may be concluded that he holds none that are dangerous; which I hope is the case with me.”

And

“Love your Enemies, for they tell you your Faults.”

And

“I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.”

And

“They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.”

And

“Let me add, that only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters.”

And

“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

And

“These Names of Virtues with their Precepts were
1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to Dulness. Drink not to Elevation.
2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or your self. Avoid trifling Conversation.
3. ORDER. Let all your Things have their Places. Let each part of your Business have its Time.
4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve.
5. FRUGALITY. Make no Expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e. Waste nothing.
6. INDUSTRY. Lose no Time. Be always employ’d in something useful. Cut off all unnecessary actions.
7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful Deceit. Think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
8. JUSTICE. Wrong none, by doing Injuries or omitting the Benefits that are your Duty.
9. MODERATION. Avoid Extremes. Forbear resenting Injuries so much as you think they deserve.
10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no Uncleanliness in Body, Clothes, or Habitation.
11. TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at Trifles, or at Accidents common or unavoidable.
12. CHASTITY. Rarely use Venery but for Health or Offspring; Never to Dulness, Weakness, or the Injury of your own or another’s Peace or Reputation.
13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.”

Wikipedia Page:  Benjamin Franklin

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