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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, November 20, 2012 – Niccolo Machiavelli

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, November 20, 2012 – Niccolo Machiavelli


“Never was anything great achieved without danger.”

And

“The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him.”

And

“The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.”

And

“There are three kinds of intelligence: one kind understands things for itself, the other appreciates what others can understand, the third understands neither for itself nor through others. This first kind is excellent, the second good, and the third kind useless.”

And

“There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.”

And

“Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.”

And

“The Romans never allowed a trouble spot to remain simply to avoid going to war over it, because they knew that wars don’t just go away, they are only postponed to someone else’s advantage.”

And

“Where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be great.”

And

“Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.”

And

“The chief foundations of all states, new as well as old or composite, are good laws and good arms; and as there cannot be good laws where the state is not well armed, it follows that where they are well armed they have good laws.”

And

“From this arises the question whether it is better to be loved rather than feared, or feared rather than loved. It might perhaps be answered that we should wish to be both: but since love and fear can hardly exist together, if we must choose between them, it is far safer to be feared than loved.”

And

“God is not willing to do everything, and thus take away our free will and that share of glory which belongs to us.”

And

“It is truly a marvelous thing to consider to what greatness Athens arrived in the space of one hundred years after she freed herself from the tyranny of Pisistratus; but, above all, it is even more marvelous to consider the greatness Rome reached when she freed herself from her kings. The reason is easy to understand, for it is the common good and not private gain that makes cities great. Yet, without a doubt, this common good is observed only in republics, for in them everything that promotes it is practised, and however much damage it does to this or that private individual, those who benefit from the said common good are so numerous that they are able to advance in spite of the inclination of the few citizens who are oppressed by it.”

And

“It is not titles that make men illustrious, but men who make titles illustrious.”

Wikipedia:  Niccolo Machiavelli

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