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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, December 7, 2012 – Franklin D. Roosevelt

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, December  7, 2012 – Franklin D. Roosevelt

“A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.”

And

“Be sincere; be brief; be seated.”

And

“Confidence… thrives on honesty, on honor, on the sacredness of obligations, on faithful protection and on unselfish performance. Without them it cannot live.”

And

“I do not look upon these United States as a finished product. We are still in the making.”

And

“I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people.”

And

“I’m not the smartest fellow in the world, but I can sure pick smart colleagues.”

And

“In our seeking for economic and political progress, we all go up – or else we all go down.”

And

“It is the duty of the President to propose and it is the privilege of the Congress to dispose.”

And

“It isn’t sufficient just to want – you’ve got to ask yourself what you are going to do to get the things you want.”

And

“Let us never forget that government is ourselves and not an alien power over us. The ultimate rulers of our democracy are not a President and senators and congressmen and government officials, but the voters of this country.”

And

“Men are not prisoners of fate, but only prisoners of their own minds.”

And

“Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the right to vote except the American people themselves and the only way they could do this is by not voting.”

And

“Rules are not necessarily sacred, principles are.”

And

“Take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly, and try another. But by all means, try something.”

And

“The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today.”

And

“The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

And

“The overwhelming majority of Americans are possessed of two great qualities a sense of humor and a sense of proportion.”

And

“The truth is found when men are free to pursue it.”

And

“The United States Constitution has proved itself the most marvelously elastic compilation of rules of government ever written.”

And

“There are many ways of going forward, but only one way of standing still.”

And

“There is nothing I love as much as a good fight.”

And

“We have always held to the hope, the belief, the conviction that there is a better life, a better world, beyond the horizon.”

And

“This is preeminently the time to speak the truth, the whole truth, frankly and boldly. Nor need we shrink from honestly facing conditions in our country today. This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory.”  First Inaugural Address, 4 March 1933

And

“Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort.”

And

“The real truth of the matter is, as you and I know, that a financial element in the larger centers has owned the Government ever since the days of Andrew Jackson — and I am not wholly excepting the Administration of W. W. The country is going through a repetition of Jackson’s fight with the Bank of the United States — only on a far bigger and broader basis.”  Letter to Col. Edward Mandell House, 21 November 1933

And

“Yes, we are on the way back — not by mere chance, not by a turn of the cycle. We are coming back more soundly than ever before because we planned it that way, and don’t let anybody tell you differently.”  Speech at the Citadel, 23 October 1935

And

“In the future days which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.

The first is freedom of speech and expression — everywhere in the world.

The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way — everywhere in the world.

The third is freedom from want, which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants — everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear, which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor — anywhere in the world.

That is no vision of a distant millennium. It is a definite basis for a kind of world attainable in our own time and generation.”
The Four Freedoms Speech, January 6, 1941

And

“We must scrupulously guard the civil rights and civil liberties of all our citizens, whatever their background. We must remember that any oppression, any injustice, any hatred, is a wedge designed to attack our civilization.”
Greeting to the American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born, Washington, D.C., 9 January 1940

And

“There is a mysterious cycle in human events. To some generations much is given. Of other generations much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny.”  Speech to the Democratic National Convention, 1936

And

“We do not see faith, hope, and charity as unattainable ideals, but we use them as stout supports of a nation fighting the fight for freedom in a modern civilization.”  Speech to the Democratic National Convention, 1936

And

“Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The United States was at peace with that nation, and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with its government and its Emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese Government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

As Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense, that always will our whole nation remember the character of the onslaught against us. No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated invasion, the American people, in their righteous might, will win through to absolute victory.

Hostilities exist. There is no blinking at the fact that our people, our territory and our interests are in grave danger. With confidence in our armed forces, with the unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable triumph, so help us God.

I ask that the Congress declare that since the unprovoked and dastardly attack by Japan on Sunday, December 7, 1941, a state of war has existed between the United States and the Japanese Empire.”  Response to the attack on Pearl Harbor, 1941

Wikipedia:   Franklin D. Roosevelt

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