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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, December 14, 2012 – Arthur Schopenhauer

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, December 14, 2012 – Arthur Schopenhauer


“A man can be himself only so long as he is alone.”

And

“A man can do what he wants, but not want what he wants.”

And

“A man’s face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man’s thoughts and aspirations.”

And

“All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.”

And

“Boredom is just the reverse side of fascination: both depend on being outside rather than inside a situation, and one leads to the other.”

And

“Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

And

“Honor means that a man is not exceptional; fame, that he is. Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.”

And

“If you want to know your true opinion of someone, watch the effect produced in you by the first sight of a letter from him.”

And

It is with trifles, and when he is off guard, that a man best reveals his character.

And

“Men are by nature merely indifferent to one another; but women are by nature enemies.”

And

“Money is human happiness in the abstract; he, then, who is no longer capable of enjoying human happiness in the concrete devotes himself utterly to money.”

And

“Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.”

And

“The longer a man’s fame is likely to last, the longer it will be in coming.”

And

“The man never feels the want of what it never occurs to him to ask for.”

And

“The wise have always said the same things, and fools, who are the majority have always done just the opposite.”

And

“We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success.”

And

“Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame.”

And

“It is the courage to make a clean breast of it in the face of every question that makes the philosopher. He must be like Sophocles’ Oedipus, who, seeking enlightenment concerning his terrible fate, pursues his indefatigable inquiry even though he divines that appalling horror awaits him in the answer. But most of us carry with us the Jocasta in our hearts, who begs Oedipus, for God’s sake, not to inquire further.”

And

“The bad thing about all religions is that, instead of being able to confess their allegorical nature, they have to conceal it; accordingly, they parade their doctrines in all seriousness as true sensu proprio, and as absurdities form an essential part of these doctrines we have the great mischief of a continual fraud. Nay, what is worse, the day arrives when they are no longer true sensu proprio, and then there is an end of them; so that, in that respect, it would be better to admit their allegorical nature at once. But the difficulty is to teach the multitude that something can be both true and untrue at the same time. Since all religions are in a greater or less degree of this nature, we must recognise the fact that mankind cannot get on without a certain amount of absurdity, that absurdity is an element in its existence, and illusion indispensable; as indeed other aspects of life testify.”

And

“Compassion is the basis of all morality.”

And

“Life is short and truth works far and lives long: let us speak the truth.”

And

“The effect of music is so very much more powerful and penetrating than is that of the other arts, for these others speak only of the shadow, but music of the essence.”

And

“In early youth, as we contemplate our coming life, we are like children in a theatre before the curtain is raised, sitting there in high spirits and eagerly waiting for the play to begin.”

And

“Do not shorten the morning by getting up late, or waste it in unworthy occupations or in talk; look upon it as the quintessence of life, as to a certain extent sacred. Evening is like old age: we are languid, talkative, silly. Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

And

“To free a man from error does not mean to take something from him, but to give him something.”

Wikipedia:  Arthur Schopenhauer

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