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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, February 14, 2013 – William Shakespeare

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, February 14, 2013 – William Shakespeare


“All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.”

And

“Be not afraid of greatness: some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.”

And

“Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.”

And

“Life every man holds dear; but the dear man holds honor far more precious dear than life.”

And

“Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”

And

“Listen to many, speak to a few.”

And

“Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.”

And

“Talking isn’t doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds.”

And

“There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat. And we must take the current when it serves, or lose our ventures.”

And

“Things done well and with a care, exempt themselves from fear.”

And

“To be, or not to be: that is the question.”

And

“To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.”

And

“We know what we are, but know not what we may be.”

And

“To be, or not to be, — that is the question: —
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? — To die, to sleep, —
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache, and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to, — ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep; —
To sleep, perchance to dream: — ay, there’s the rub;
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause: there’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life;
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despis’d love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would these fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death, —
The undiscover’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, — puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know naught of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all;
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought;
And enterprises of great pith and moment,
With this regard, their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action.”
Hamlet, Act III, Scene 1

And

“She should have died hereafter;
There would have been time for such a word.
Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time;
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.”
Macbeth, Act V, Scene 5

And

“There is a tide in the affairs of men
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat;
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.”
Julius Caesar, Brutus, Act IV, Scene 3

And

“My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have, for both are infinite.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“When he shall die,
Take him and cut him out in little stars,
And he will make the face of heaven so fine
That all the world will be in love with night
And pay no worship to the garish sun.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“Don’t waste your love on somebody, who doesn’t value it.”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“There’s an old saying that applies to me: you can’t lose a game if you don’t play the game. (Act 1, scene 4)”
Romeo and Juliet

And

“True, I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy,
Which is as thin of substance as the air,
And more inconstant than the wind, who woos
Even now the frozen bosom of the north,
And, being anger’d, puffs away from thence,
Turning his side to the dew-dropping south.”
Romeo and Juliet

Wikipedia:  William Shakespeare

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