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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, February 18, 2013 – George Washington

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, February 18, 2013 – George Washington

“The power under the Constitution will always be in the people.  It is entrusted for certain defined purposes, and for a certain limited period, to representatives of their own choosing; and whenever it is executed contrary to their interest, or not agreeable to their wishes, their servants can, and undoubtedly will, be recalled.”

And

“A slender acquaintance with the world must convince every man that actions, not words, are the true criterion of the attachment of friends.”

And

“Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.”

And

“Be courteous to all, but intimate with few, and let those few be well tried before you give them your confidence.”

And

“Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable; procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.”

And

“Experience teaches us that it is much easier to prevent an enemy from posting themselves than it is to dislodge them after they have got possession.”

And

“Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”

And

“Happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected.”

And

“I hope I shall possess firmness and virtue enough to maintain what I consider the most enviable of all titles, the character of an honest man.”

And

“If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”

And

“It may be laid down as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a Free Government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal services to the defense of it.”

And

“Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth.”

And

“Nothing can be more hurtful to the service, than the neglect of discipline; for that discipline, more than numbers, gives one army the superiority over another.”

And

“To be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace.”

And

“Truth will ultimately prevail where there is pains to bring it to light.”

And

“War – An act of violence whose object is to constrain the enemy, to accomplish our will.”

And

“Worry is the interest paid by those who borrow trouble.”

And

“The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or die.” George Washington, Address to the Continental Army before the Battle of Long Island, 27 August 1776

And

“Nothing is a greater stranger to my breast, or a sin that my soul more abhors, than that black and detestable one, ingratitude.”

And

“There is a Destiny which has the control of our actions, not to be resisted by the strongest efforts of Human Nature.”

And

“The only stipulations I shall contend for are, that in all things you shall do as you please. I will do the same; and that no ceremony may be used or any restraint be imposed on any one.”

And

“Rise early, that by habit it may become familiar, agreeable, healthy, and profitable. It may, for a while, be irksome to do this, but that will wear off; and the practice will produce a rich harvest forever thereafter; whether in public or private walks of life.”

And

“The Citizens of the United States of America have a right to applaud themselves for giving to Mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy: a policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of, as if it was by the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights. For happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.”

And

“A free people ought not only to be armed, but disciplined; to which end a uniform and well-digested plan is requisite; and their safety and interest require that they should promote such manufactories as tend to render them independent of others for essential, particularly military, supplies.”

And

“We have abundant reason to rejoice, that, in this land, the light of truth and reason has triumphed over the power of bigotry and superstition, and that every person may here worship God according to the dictates of his own heart. In this enlightened age, & in this land of equal liberty, it is our boast, that a man’s religious tenets will not forfeit the protection of the laws, nor deprive him of the right of attaining & holding the highest offices that are known in the United States.”

Wikipedia:  George Washington

 

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