Author Archive: Harry

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, June 13, 2022 – Calvin Coolidge

“After all, the chief business of the American people is business. They are profoundly concerned with producing, buying, selling, investing and prospering in the world.”

And

“All growth depends upon activity. There is no development physically or intellectually without effort, and effort means work.”

And

“I have found it advisable not to give too much heed to what people say when I am trying to accomplish something of consequence. Invariably they proclaim it can’t be done. I deem that the very best time to make the effort.”

And

“If I had permitted my failures, or what seemed to me at the time a lack of success, to discourage me I cannot see any way in which I would ever have made progress.”

And

“Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers. It may not be difficult to store up in the mind a vast quantity of face within a comparatively short time, but the ability to form judgments requires the severe discipline of hard work and the tempering heat of experience and maturity.”

And

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated failures. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.  The slogan “press on” has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race.”

And

“Parties do not maintain themselves. They are maintained by effort. The government is not self-existent. It is maintained by the effort of those who believe in it. The people of America believe in American institutions, the American form of government and the American method of transacting business.”

And

“I favor the policy of economy, not because I wish to save money, but because I wish to save people. The men and women of this country who toil are the ones who bear the cost of the Government. Every dollar that we carelessly waste means that their life will be so much the more meager. Every dollar that we prudently save means that their life will be so much the more abundant. Economy is idealism in its most practical form.”

And

“The chief business of the American people is business.”

And

“If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final.”

Wikipedia Page: Calvin Coolidge

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday – June 12, 2022 – Jesse Owens

“A lifetime of training for just ten seconds.”

And

“Friendships born on the field of athletic strife are the real gold of competition. Awards become corroded, friends gather no dust.”

And

“I let my feet spend as little time on the ground as possible. From the air, fast down, and from the ground, fast up.”

And

“I always loved running – it was something you could do by yourself and under your own power. You could go in any direction, fast or slow as you wanted, fighting the wind if you felt like it, seeking out new sights just on the strength of your feet and the courage of your lungs.”

And

“If you don’t try to win you might as well hold the Olympics in somebody’s back yard. The thrill of competing carries with it the thrill of a gold medal. One wants to win to prove himself the best.”

And

“One chance is all you need.”

And

“The battles that count aren’t the ones for gold medals. The struggles within yourself – the invisible, inevitable battles inside all of us – that’s where it’s at.”

And

“We all have dreams. But in order to make dreams come into reality, it takes an awful lot of determination, dedication, self-discipline, and effort.”

And

“I wanted no part of politics. And I wasn’t in Berlin to compete against any one athlete. The purpose of the Olympics, anyway, was to do your best. As I’d learned long ago from Charles Riley, the only victory that counts is the one over yourself.”

And

“To a sprinter, the hundred-yard dash is over in three seconds, not nine or ten. The first ‘second’ is when you come out of the blocks. The next is when you look up and take your first few strides to attain gain position. By that time the race is actually about half over. The final ‘second’ – the longest slice of time in the world for an athlete – is that last half of the race, when you really bear down and see what you’re made of. It seems to take an eternity, yet is all over before you can think what’s happening.”

And

“I fought, I fought harder . . . but one cell at a time, panic crept into my body, taking me over.”  –on almost not qualifying for the Olympic finals in long jump

And

“I decided I wasn’t going to come down. I was going to fly. I was going to stay up in the air forever.”  –on his final leap in long-jump competition, a record-breaking 26 feet, 5 and 5/16 inches

And

“It dawned on me with blinding brightness. I realized: I had jumped into another rare kind of stratosphere – one that only a handful of people in every generation are lucky enough to know.”  
–on his Olympic achievements

Wikipedia:  Jesse Owens

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, June 11, 2022 – Dwight D. Eisenhower

“A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both.”

And

“Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in the blood of his followers and the sacrifices of his friends.”

And

“I would rather try to persuade a man to go along, because once I have persuaded him, he will stick. If I scare him, he will stay just as long as he is scared, and then he is gone.”

And

“In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.”

And

“Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.”

And

“The older I get the more wisdom I find in the ancient rule of taking first things first. A process which often reduces the most complex human problem to a manageable proportion.”

And

“The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office.”

And

“What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight – it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

And

“When you are in any contest, you should work as if there were – to the very last minute – a chance to lose it. This is battle, this is politics, this is anything.”

And

“You don’t lead by hitting people over the head – that’s assault, not leadership.”

And

“An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows.”

And

“Don’t join the book burners. Do not think you are going to conceal thoughts by concealing evidence that they ever existed.”

And

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.”

And

“Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you’re a thousand miles from the corn field.”

And

“Here in America we are descended in blood and in spirit from revolutionists and rebels – men and women who dare to dissent from accepted doctrine. As their heirs, may we never confuse honest dissent with disloyal subversion.”

And

“History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.”

And

“How far you can go without destroying from within what you are trying to defend from without?”

And

“I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity.”

And

“I have one yardstick by which I test every major problem – and that yardstick is: Is it good for America?”

And

“I like to believe that people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our governments. Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that one of these days governments had better get out of the way and let them have it.”

And

“If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.”

And

“If you want total security, go to prison. There you’re fed, clothed, given medical care and so on. The only thing lacking… is freedom.”

And

“May we never confuse honest dissent with disloyal subversion.”

And

“Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him.”

And

“Only strength can cooperate. Weakness can only beg.”

And

“Our real problem, then, is not our strength today; it is rather the vital necessity of action today to ensure our strength tomorrow.”

And

“Plans are nothing; planning is everything.”

And

“The history of free men is never really written by chance but by choice; their choice!”

And

“The spirit of man is more important than mere physical strength, and the spiritual fiber of a nation than its wealth.”

And

“There is nothing wrong with America that faith, love of freedom, intelligence, and energy of her citizens cannot cure.”

And

“We will bankrupt ourselves in the vain search for absolute security.”

And

“When people speak to you about a preventive war, you tell them to go and fight it. After my experience, I have come to hate war.”

And

“Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force!

You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!

I have full confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle.

We will accept nothing less than full Victory! Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.”

Order of the Day (2 June 1944) Message to troops before the Normandy landings

And

“We must be ready to dare all for our country. For history does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid. We must acquire proficiency in defense and display stamina in purpose. We must be willing, individually and as a Nation, to accept whatever sacrifices may be required of us. A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both. These basic precepts are not lofty abstractions, far removed from matters of daily living. They are laws of spiritual strength that generate and define our material strength. Patriotism means equipped forces and a prepared citizenry. Moral stamina means more energy and more productivity, on the farm and in the factory. Love of liberty means the guarding of every resource that makes freedom possible–from the sanctity of our families and the wealth of our soil to the genius of our scientists.”

First Inaugural address (20 January 1953)

And

“As we peer into society’s future, we — you and I, and our government — must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for our own ease and convenience the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without risking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.”

And

“In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless but planning is indispensable.”

And

“Character in many ways is everything in leadership. It is made up of many things, but I would say character is really integrity. When you delegate something to a subordinate, for example, it is absolutely your responsibility, and he must understand this. You as a leader must take complete responsibility for what the subordinate does. I once said, as a sort of wisecrack, that leadership consists of nothing but taking responsibility for everything that goes wrong and giving your subordinates credit for everything that goes well.”

And

“I’m going to command the whole shebang.” Comment to his wife Mamie, after being informed by George Marshall that he would be in command of Operation Overlord

And

“We look upon this shaken Earth, and we declare our firm and fixed purpose — the building of a peace with justice in a world where moral law prevails. The building of such a peace is a bold and solemn purpose. To proclaim it is easy. To serve it will be hard. And to attain it, we must be aware of its full meaning — and ready to pay its full price. We know clearly what we seek, and why. We seek peace, knowing that peace is the climate of freedom. And now, as in no other age, we seek it because we have been warned, by the power of modern weapons, that peace may be the only climate possible for human life itself. Yet this peace we seek cannot be born of fear alone: it must be rooted in the lives of nations. There must be justice, sensed and shared by all peoples, for, without justice the world can know only a tense and unstable truce. There must be law, steadily invoked and respected by all nations, for without law, the world promises only such meager justice as the pity of the strong upon the weak. But the law of which we speak, comprehending the values of freedom, affirms the equality of all nations, great and small. Splendid as can be the blessings of such a peace, high will be its cost: in toil patiently sustained, in help honorably given, in sacrifice calmly borne.” Second Inaugural address (21 January 1957)

And

“I do have one instruction for you, General. Do something about that damned football team.” Said to William Westmoreland in 1960 when Westmoreland assumed the post of Superintendent of West Point.

And

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. The cost of one modern heavy bomber is this: a modern brick school in more than 30 cities. It is two electric power plants, each serving a town of 60,000 population. It is two fine, fully equipped hospitals. It is some fifty miles of concrete pavement. We pay for a single fighter plane with a half million bushels of wheat. We pay for a single destroyer with new homes that could have housed more than 8,000 people. This is, I repeat, the best way of life to be found on the road the world has been taking. This is not a way of life at all, in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron. … Is there no other way the world may live?”

And

Farewell Address, January 17, 1961

“We now stand ten years past the midpoint of a century that has witnessed four major wars among great nations. Three of these involved our own country. Despite these holocausts, America is today the strongest, the most influential, and most productive nation in the world. Understandably proud of this pre-eminence, we yet realize that America’s leadership and prestige depend, not merely upon our unmatched material progress, riches and military strength, but on how we use our power in the interests of world peace and human betterment.

Throughout America’s adventure in free government, our basic purposes have been to keep the peace, to foster progress in human achievement, and to enhance liberty, dignity and integrity among peoples and among nations. To strive for less would be unworthy of a free and religious people. Any failure traceable to arrogance or our lack of comprehension or readiness to sacrifice would inflict upon us grievous hurt, both at home and abroad.

Crises there will continue to be. In meeting them, whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a recurring temptation to feel that some spectacular and costly action could become the miraculous solution to all current difficulties. A huge increase in newer elements of our defenses; development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture; a dramatic expansion in basic and applied research — these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising in itself, may be suggested as the only way to the road we wish to travel. But each proposal must be weighed in the light of a broader consideration: the need to maintain balance in and among national programs, balance between the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desirable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. Good judgment seeks balance and progress. Lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration.

Now this conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every Statehouse, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources, and livelihood are all involved. So is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.

Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades. In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers. The prospect of domination of the nation’s scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present — and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.

As we peer into society’s future, we — you and I, and our government — must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for our own ease and convenience the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without risking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.”

During the long lane of the history yet to be written, America knows that this world of ours, ever growing smaller, must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be, instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect. Such a confederation must be one of equals. The weakest must come to the conference table with the same confidence as do we, protected as we are by our moral, economic, and military strength. That table, though scarred by many past frustrations, cannot be abandoned for the certain agony of the battlefield.

Disarmament, with mutual honor and confidence, is a continuing imperative. Together we must learn how to compose differences, not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose.”

And

“One circumstance that helped our character development: we were needed. I often think today of what an impact could be made if children believed they were contributing to a family’s essential survival and happiness. In the transformation from a rural to an urban society, children are — though they might not agree — robbed of the opportunity to do genuinely responsible work.”

Wikipedia:  Dwight Eisenhower

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, June 10, 2022 – Chuck Yeager

“If you want to grow old as a pilot, you’ve got to know when to push it, and when to back off.”

And

“Later, I realized that the mission had to end in a let-down because the real barrier wasn’t in the sky but in our knowledge and experience of supersonic flight.”

And

“Most pilots learn, when they pin on their wings and go out and get in a fighter, especially, that one thing you don’t do, you don’t believe anything anybody tells you about an airplane.”

And

“Never wait for trouble.”

And

“Rules are made for people who aren’t willing to make up their own.”

And

“You do what you can for as long as you can, and when you finally can’t, you do the next best thing. You back up but you don’t give up.”

And

“You don’t concentrate on risks. You concentrate on results. No risk is too great to prevent the necessary job from getting done.”

And

“Unfortunately, many people do not consider fun an important item on their daily agenda. For me, that was always high priority in whatever I was doing.”

Wikipedia:  Chuck Yeager

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, June 9, 2022 – William Faulkner

“A gentleman can live through anything.”

And

“A man’s moral conscience is the curse he had to accept from the gods in order to gain from them the right to dream.”

And

“A mule will labor ten years willingly and patiently for you, for the privilege of kicking you once.”

And

“All of us failed to match our dreams of perfection. So I rate us on the basis of our splendid failure to do the impossible.”

And

“Always dream and shoot higher than you know you can do. Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself.”

And

“An artist is a creature driven by demons. He doesn’t know why they choose him and he’s usually too busy to wonder why.”

And

“Clocks slay time… time is dead as long as it is being clicked off by little wheels; only when the clock stops does time come to life.”

And

“Facts and truth really don’t have much to do with each other.”

And

“Given a choice between grief and nothing, I’d choose grief.”

And

“Hollywood is a place where a man can get stabbed in the back while climbing a ladder.”

And

“I believe that man will not merely endure. He will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance.”

And

“I have found that the greatest help in meeting any problem is to know where you yourself stand. That is, to have in words what you believe and are acting from.”

And

“I’m bad and I’m going to hell, and I don’t care. I’d rather be in hell than anywhere where you are.”

And

“I’m inclined to think that a military background wouldn’t hurt anyone.”

And

“It’s a shame that the only thing a man can do for eight hours a day is work. He can’t eat for eight hours; he can’t drink for eight hours; he can’t make love for eight hours. The only thing a man can do for eight hours is work.”

And

“Man performs and engenders so much more than he can or should have to bear. That’s how he finds that he can bear anything.”

And

“My own experience has been that the tools I need for my trade are paper, tobacco, food, and a little whisky.”

And

“The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life.”

And

“The end of wisdom is to dream high enough to lose the dream in the seeking of it.”

And

“There is something about jumping a horse over a fence, something that makes you feel good. Perhaps it’s the risk, the gamble. In any event it’s a thing I need.”

And

“Tomorrow night is nothing but one long sleepless wrestle with yesterday’s omissions and regrets.”

And

‘We have to start teaching ourselves not to be afraid.”

And

“You should approach Joyce’s Ulysses as the illiterate Baptist preacher approaches the Old Testament: with faith.”

And

“Even a liar can be scared into telling the truth, same as an honest man can be tortured into telling a lie.”

And

“Be scared. You can’t help that. But don’t be afraid. Ain’t nothing in the woods going to hurt you unless you corner it, or it smells that you are afraid. A bear or a deer, too, has got to be scared of a coward the same as a brave man has got to be.”

And

“I decline to accept the end of man. It is easy enough to say that man is immortal because he will endure: that when the last ding-dong of doom has clanged and faded from the last worthless rock hanging tideless in the last red and dying evening, that even then there will still be one more sound: that of his puny inexhaustible voice, still talking. I refuse to accept this. I believe that man will not merely endure: he will prevail. He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice, but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance. The poet’s, the writer’s, duty is to write about these things. It is his privilege to help man endure by lifting his heart, by reminding him of the courage and honor and hope and pride and compassion and pity and sacrifice which have been the glory of his past. The poet’s voice need not merely be the record of man, it can be one of the props, the pillars to help him endure and prevail.” Nobel Prize Speech, December 1950

And

“Mr. Khrushchev says that Communism, the police state, will bury the free ones. He is a smart gentleman, he knows that this is nonsense since freedom, man’s dim concept of and belief in the human spirit is the cause of all his troubles in his own country. But if he means that Communism will bury capitalism, he is correct. That funeral will occur about ten minutes after the police bury gambling. Because simple man, the human race, will bury both of them. That will be when we have expended the last grain, dram, and iota of our natural resources. But man himself will not be in that grave. The last sound on the worthless earth will be two human beings trying to launch a homemade spaceship and already quarreling about where they are going next.” Speech in New York, October 1959

And

“No one is without Christianity, if we agree on what we mean by that word. It is every individual’s individual code of behavior by means of which he makes himself a better human being than his nature wants to be, if he followed his nature only. Whatever its symbol — cross or crescent or whatever — that symbol is man’s reminder of his duty inside the human race. Its various allegories are the charts against which he measures himself and learns to know what he is. It cannot teach a man to be good as the textbook teaches him mathematics. It shows him how to discover himself, evolve for himself a moral codes and standard within his capacities and aspirations, by giving him a matchless example of suffering and sacrifice and the promise of hope.” Paris Review Interview, 1958

And

The two great men in my time were Mann and Joyce. You should approach Joyce’s Ulysses as the illiterate Baptist preacher approaches the Old Testament: with “faith.”

And

“Life is motion, and motion is concerned with what makes man move — which is ambition, power, pleasure. What time a man can devote to morality, he must take by force from the motion of which he is a part. He is compelled to make choices between good and evil sooner or later, because moral conscience demands that from him in order that he can live with himself tomorrow. His moral conscience is the curse he had to accept from the gods in order to gain from them the right to dream.”

Wikipedia: William Faulkner

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, June 8, 2022 – James Dean

“Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.”

And

“There is no way to be truly great in this world. We are all impaled on the crook of conditioning.”

And

“Being an actor is the loneliest thing in the world. You are all alone with your concentration and imagination, and that’s all you have.”

And

“Only the gentle are ever really strong.”

And

“Being a good actor isn’t easy. Being a man is even harder. I want to be both before I’m done.”

And

“When an actor plays a scene exactly the way a director orders, it isn’t acting. It’s following instructions. Anyone with the physical qualifications can do that.”

And

“If a man can bridge the gap between life and death, if he can live on after he’s dead, then maybe he was a great man.”

And

“To grasp the full significance of life is the actor’s duty; to interpret it is his problem; and to express it is his dedication.”

And

“The gratification comes in the doing, not in the results.”

And

“The only greatness for man is immortality.”

And

“I also became close to nature, and am now able to appreciate the beauty with which this world is endowed.”

Wikipedia: James Dean

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, June 7, 2022 – Roger Staubach

“Football teaches you hard work. It takes a lot of unspectacular preparation to have spectacular results in both business and football.”

And

“It’s okay to have personal ambitions, but you have to take someone with you.”

And

“Confidence doesn’t come out of nowhere. It’s a result of something… hours and days and weeks and years of constant work and dedication.”

And

“Nothing good comes in life or athletics unless a lot of hard work has preceded the effort. Only temporary success is achieved by taking short cuts.”

And

“In any team sport, the best teams have consistency and chemistry.”

And

“Winning isn’t getting ahead of others. It’s getting ahead of yourself.”

And

“There are no traffic jams along the extra mile.”

Wikipedia: Roger Staubach

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day -Monday, June 6, 2022 – Norman Schwarzkopf

“Do what is right, not what you think the high headquarters wants or what you think will make you look good.”

And

“It doesn’t take a hero to order men into battle. It takes a hero to be one of those men who goes into battle.”

And

“Leadership is a potent combination of strategy and character. But if you must be without one, be without the strategy.”

And

“When placed in command – take charge.”

And

“You learn far more from negative leadership than from positive leadership. Because you learn how not to do it. And, therefore, you learn how to do it.”

And

Courage brother, do not stumble, though thy path be dark as night: There is a star to guide the humble, trust in God, and do the right. Let the road be dark and dreary and its end far out of sight. Face it bravely, strong or weary. Trust God, and do”

And

“The truth of the matter is that you always know the right thing to do. The hard part is doing it.”

And

“A professional soldier understands that war means killing people, war means maiming people, war means families left without fathers and mothers. All you have to do is hold your first dying soldier in your arms, and have that terribly futile feeling that his life is flowing out and you can’t do anything about it. Then you understand the horror of war. Any soldier worth his salt should be antiwar. And still there are things worth fighting for.”

And

“As far as Saddam Hussein being a great military strategist: He is neither a strategist, nor is he schooled in the operational art, nor is he a tactician, nor is he a general, nor is he a soldier. Other than that, he’s a great military man.”

And

“True courage is being afraid, and going ahead and doing your job.”

And

“I believe that forgiving them is God’s function. Our job is to arrange the meeting.”‘

And

“Soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines of the United States Central Command, this morning at 0300, we launched Operation DESERT STORM, an offensive campaign that will enforce the United Nation’s resolutions that Iraq must cease its rape and pillage of its weaker neighbor and withdraw its forces from Kuwait. My confidence in you is total. Our cause is just! Now you must be the thunder and lightning of Desert Storm. May God be with you, your loved ones at home, and our Country.” General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, USA Commander-in-Chief U.S. Central Command, in a message to the command, 16 January 1991

Wikipedia: Norman Schwarzkopf

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, June 5, 2021 – Frank Lloyd Wright

“A free America… means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call democracy is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

And

“Early in life I had to choose between honest arrogance and hypocritical humility. I chose the former and have seen no reason to change.”

And

“Freedom is from within.”

And

“Get the habit of analysis – analysis will in time enable synthesis to become your habit of mind.”

And

“Harvard takes perfectly good plums as students, and turns them into prunes.”

And

“I believe totally in a Capitalist System, I only wish that someone would try it.”

And

“I know the price of success:  dedication, hard work and an unremitting devotion to thing you want to see happen.”

And

“Life always rides in strength to victory, not through internationalism… but only through the direct responsibility of the individual.”

And

“Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.”

And

“The heart is the chief feature of a functioning mind.”

And

“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.”

And

“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

And

“The thing always happens that you really believe in; and the belief in a thing makes it happen.”

And

“The truth is more important than the facts.”

And

“”Think simple” as my old master used to say – meaning reduce the whole of its parts into the simplest terms, getting back to first principles.”

And

“There is nothing more uncommon than common sense.”

And

“No house should ever be on a hill or on anything. It should be of the hill. Belonging to it. Hill and house should live together each the happier for the other.”

And

“A free America, democratic in the sense that our forefathers intended it to be, means just this: individual freedom for all, rich or poor, or else this system of government we call ‘democracy’ is only an expedient to enslave man to the machine and make him like it.”

And

“Every great architect is — necessarily — a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.”

And

“Human beings can be beautiful. If they are not beautiful it is entirely their own fault. It is what they do to themselves that makes them ugly. The longer I live the more beautiful life becomes. If you foolishly ignore beauty, you will soon find yourself without it. Your life will be impoverished. But if you invest in beauty, it will remain with you all the days of your life.”

And

“The present is the ever moving shadow that divides yesterday from tomorrow. In that lies hope.”

Wikipedia:  Frank Lloyd Wright

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, June 4, 2022 – Robert Louis Stevenson

“A friend is a gift you give yourself.”

And

“All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer.”

And

“An aim in life is the only fortune worth finding.”

And

“Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant.”

And

“Everyone lives by selling something.”

And

“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.”

And

“I never weary of great churches. It is my favorite kind of mountain scenery. Mankind was never so happily inspired as when it made a cathedral.”

And

“It is the mark of a good action that it appears inevitable in retrospect.”

And

“Life is not a matter of holding good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.”

And

“Most of our pocket wisdom is conceived for the use of mediocre people, to discourage them from ambitious attempts, and generally console them in their mediocrity.”

And

“Politics is perhaps the only profession for which no preparation and is thought necessary.”

And

“Talk is by far the most accessible of pleasures. It costs nothing in money, it is all profit, it completes our education, founds and fosters our friendships, and can be enjoyed at any age and in almost any state of health.”

And

“The world has no room for cowards.”

And

“To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

And

“To become what we are capable of becoming is the only end in life.”

And

“We must accept life for what it actually is – a challenge to our quality without which we should never know of what stuff we are made, or grow to our full stature.”

And

“You cannot run away from weakness; you must some time fight it out or perish; and if that be so, why not now, and where you stand?”

And

“You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us.”

And

“So long as we love we serve; so long as we are loved by others, I would almost say that we are indispensable; and no man is useless while he has a friend.”

And

“The Monterey Peninsula is the greatest meeting of land and sea in the world.”

Wikipedia:  Robert Louis Stevenson

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