Coaches Hot Seat Blog

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, April 27, 2021 – Dwight D. Eisenhower

“A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both.”

And

“Humility must always be the portion of any man who receives acclaim earned in the blood of his followers and the sacrifices of his friends.”

And

“I would rather try to persuade a man to go along, because once I have persuaded him, he will stick. If I scare him, he will stay just as long as he is scared, and then he is gone.”

And

“In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.”

And

“Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.”

And

“The older I get the more wisdom I find in the ancient rule of taking first things first. A process which often reduces the most complex human problem to a manageable proportion.”

And

“The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office.”

And

“What counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight – it’s the size of the fight in the dog.”

And

“When you are in any contest, you should work as if there were – to the very last minute – a chance to lose it. This is battle, this is politics, this is anything.”

And

“You don’t lead by hitting people over the head – that’s assault, not leadership.”

And

“An intellectual is a man who takes more words than necessary to tell more than he knows.”

And

“Don’t join the book burners. Do not think you are going to conceal thoughts by concealing evidence that they ever existed.”

And

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired, signifies in the final sense a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed.”

And

“Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil and you’re a thousand miles from the corn field.”

And

“Here in America we are descended in blood and in spirit from revolutionists and rebels – men and women who dare to dissent from accepted doctrine. As their heirs, may we never confuse honest dissent with disloyal subversion.”

And

“History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid.”

And

“How far you can go without destroying from within what you are trying to defend from without?”

And

“I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity.”

And

“I have one yardstick by which I test every major problem – and that yardstick is: Is it good for America?”

And

“I like to believe that people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our governments. Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that one of these days governments had better get out of the way and let them have it.”

And

“If a problem cannot be solved, enlarge it.”

And

“If you want total security, go to prison. There you’re fed, clothed, given medical care and so on. The only thing lacking… is freedom.”

And

“May we never confuse honest dissent with disloyal subversion.”

And

“Neither a wise man nor a brave man lies down on the tracks of history to wait for the train of the future to run over him.”

And

“Only strength can cooperate. Weakness can only beg.”

And

“Our real problem, then, is not our strength today; it is rather the vital necessity of action today to ensure our strength tomorrow.”

And

“Plans are nothing; planning is everything.”

And

“The history of free men is never really written by chance but by choice; their choice!”

And

“The spirit of man is more important than mere physical strength, and the spiritual fiber of a nation than its wealth.”

And

“There is nothing wrong with America that faith, love of freedom, intelligence, and energy of her citizens cannot cure.”

And

“We will bankrupt ourselves in the vain search for absolute security.”

And

“When people speak to you about a preventive war, you tell them to go and fight it. After my experience, I have come to hate war.”

And

“Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force!

You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!

I have full confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle.

We will accept nothing less than full Victory! Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.”

Order of the Day (2 June 1944) Message to troops before the Normandy landings

And

“We must be ready to dare all for our country. For history does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid. We must acquire proficiency in defense and display stamina in purpose. We must be willing, individually and as a Nation, to accept whatever sacrifices may be required of us. A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both. These basic precepts are not lofty abstractions, far removed from matters of daily living. They are laws of spiritual strength that generate and define our material strength. Patriotism means equipped forces and a prepared citizenry. Moral stamina means more energy and more productivity, on the farm and in the factory. Love of liberty means the guarding of every resource that makes freedom possible–from the sanctity of our families and the wealth of our soil to the genius of our scientists.”

First Inaugural address (20 January 1953)

And

“As we peer into society’s future, we — you and I, and our government — must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for our own ease and convenience the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without risking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.”

And

“In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless but planning is indispensable.”

And

“Character in many ways is everything in leadership. It is made up of many things, but I would say character is really integrity. When you delegate something to a subordinate, for example, it is absolutely your responsibility, and he must understand this. You as a leader must take complete responsibility for what the subordinate does. I once said, as a sort of wisecrack, that leadership consists of nothing but taking responsibility for everything that goes wrong and giving your subordinates credit for everything that goes well.”

And

“I’m going to command the whole shebang.” Comment to his wife Mamie, after being informed by George Marshall that he would be in command of Operation Overlord

And

“We look upon this shaken Earth, and we declare our firm and fixed purpose — the building of a peace with justice in a world where moral law prevails. The building of such a peace is a bold and solemn purpose. To proclaim it is easy. To serve it will be hard. And to attain it, we must be aware of its full meaning — and ready to pay its full price. We know clearly what we seek, and why. We seek peace, knowing that peace is the climate of freedom. And now, as in no other age, we seek it because we have been warned, by the power of modern weapons, that peace may be the only climate possible for human life itself. Yet this peace we seek cannot be born of fear alone: it must be rooted in the lives of nations. There must be justice, sensed and shared by all peoples, for, without justice the world can know only a tense and unstable truce. There must be law, steadily invoked and respected by all nations, for without law, the world promises only such meager justice as the pity of the strong upon the weak. But the law of which we speak, comprehending the values of freedom, affirms the equality of all nations, great and small. Splendid as can be the blessings of such a peace, high will be its cost: in toil patiently sustained, in help honorably given, in sacrifice calmly borne.” Second Inaugural address (21 January 1957)

And

“I do have one instruction for you, General. Do something about that damned football team.” Said to William Westmoreland in 1960 when Westmoreland assumed the post of Superintendent of West Point.

And

“Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. The cost of one modern heavy bomber is this: a modern brick school in more than 30 cities. It is two electric power plants, each serving a town of 60,000 population. It is two fine, fully equipped hospitals. It is some fifty miles of concrete pavement. We pay for a single fighter plane with a half million bushels of wheat. We pay for a single destroyer with new homes that could have housed more than 8,000 people. This is, I repeat, the best way of life to be found on the road the world has been taking. This is not a way of life at all, in any true sense. Under the cloud of threatening war, it is humanity hanging from a cross of iron. … Is there no other way the world may live?”

And

Farewell Address, January 17, 1961

“We now stand ten years past the midpoint of a century that has witnessed four major wars among great nations. Three of these involved our own country. Despite these holocausts, America is today the strongest, the most influential, and most productive nation in the world. Understandably proud of this pre-eminence, we yet realize that America’s leadership and prestige depend, not merely upon our unmatched material progress, riches and military strength, but on how we use our power in the interests of world peace and human betterment.

Throughout America’s adventure in free government, our basic purposes have been to keep the peace, to foster progress in human achievement, and to enhance liberty, dignity and integrity among peoples and among nations. To strive for less would be unworthy of a free and religious people. Any failure traceable to arrogance or our lack of comprehension or readiness to sacrifice would inflict upon us grievous hurt, both at home and abroad.

Crises there will continue to be. In meeting them, whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a recurring temptation to feel that some spectacular and costly action could become the miraculous solution to all current difficulties. A huge increase in newer elements of our defenses; development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture; a dramatic expansion in basic and applied research — these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising in itself, may be suggested as the only way to the road we wish to travel. But each proposal must be weighed in the light of a broader consideration: the need to maintain balance in and among national programs, balance between the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desirable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. Good judgment seeks balance and progress. Lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration.

Now this conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every Statehouse, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources, and livelihood are all involved. So is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.

Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades. In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers. The prospect of domination of the nation’s scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present — and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.

As we peer into society’s future, we — you and I, and our government — must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for our own ease and convenience the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without risking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.”

During the long lane of the history yet to be written, America knows that this world of ours, ever growing smaller, must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be, instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect. Such a confederation must be one of equals. The weakest must come to the conference table with the same confidence as do we, protected as we are by our moral, economic, and military strength. That table, though scarred by many past frustrations, cannot be abandoned for the certain agony of the battlefield.

Disarmament, with mutual honor and confidence, is a continuing imperative. Together we must learn how to compose differences, not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose.”

And

“One circumstance that helped our character development: we were needed. I often think today of what an impact could be made if children believed they were contributing to a family’s essential survival and happiness. In the transformation from a rural to an urban society, children are — though they might not agree — robbed of the opportunity to do genuinely responsible work.”

Wikipedia:  Dwight Eisenhower

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, April 26, 2021 – Joe Namath

“First, I prepare. Then I have faith.”

And

“If you aren’t going all the way, why go at all?”

And

“Till I was 13, I thought my name was “Shut Up.””

And

“To be a leader, you have to make people want to follow you, and nobody wants to follow someone who doesn’t know where he is going.”

And

“We’re going to win Sunday. I guarantee it.”

And

“When we won the league championship, all the married guys on the club had to thank their wives for putting up with all the stress and strain all season. I had to thank all the single broads in New York.”

And

“When you have confidence, you can have a lot of fun. And when you have fun, you can do amazing things.”

And

“When you win, nothing hurts.”

And

“You learn how to be a gracious winner and an outstanding loser.”

Wikipedia:  Joe Namath

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, April 25, 2021 – Peter Drucker

“A manager is responsible for the application and performance of knowledge.”

And

“Checking the results of a decision against its expectations shows executives what their strengths are, where they need to improve, and where they lack knowledge or information.”

And

“Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results not attributes.”

And

“Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.”

And

“Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased constantly, or it vanishes.”

And

“Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.”

And

“People who don’t take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year. People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year.”

And

“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.”

And

“The only thing we know about the future is that it will be different.”

And

“Time is the scarcest resource and unless it is managed nothing else can be managed.”

And

“Unless commitment is made, there are only promises and hopes; but no plans.”

And

“Management by objective works – if you know the objectives. Ninety percent of the time you don’t.”

And

“Never mind your happiness; do your duty.”

And

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

And

“We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.”

And

“Morale in an organization does not mean that “people get along together”; the test is performance not conformance.”

And

“A man should never be appointed into a managerial position if his vision focuses on people’s weaknesses rather than on their strengths.” The Practice of Management (1954)

And

“It does not matter whether the worker wants responsibility or not, …The enterprise must demand it of him.” The Practice of Management (1954)

And

“The postwar [WWII] GI Bill of Rights–and the enthusiastic response to it on the part of America’s veterans–signaled the shift to the knowledge society. Future historians may consider it the most important event of the twentieth century. We are clearly in the midst of this transformation; indeed, if history is any guide, it will not be completed until 2010 or 2020. But already it has changed the political, economic and moral landscape of the world.” Managing in a Time of Great Change (1995)

And

“Most discussions of decision making assume that only senior executives make decisions or that only senior executives’ decisions matter. This is a dangerous mistake.”

And

“Never mind your happiness; do your duty.”

And

“Rank does not confer privilege or give power. It imposes responsibility.”

And

“Management by objective works – if you know the objectives. Ninety percent of the time you don’t.”

And

“Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased constantly, or it vanishes.”

And

“We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.”

And

“No institution can possibly survive if it needs geniuses or supermen to manage it. It must be organized in such a way as to be able to get along under a leadership composed of average human beings.”

And

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

And

“Business, that’s easily defined – it’s other people’s money.”

And

“Trying to predict the future is like trying to drive down a country road at night with no lights while looking out the back window.”

And

“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.”

And

“Making good decisions is a crucial skill at every level.”

And

‘Today knowledge has power. It controls access to opportunity and advancement.”

And

“Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action.”

And

“The purpose of business is to create and keep a customer.”

And

“The leaders who work most effectively, it seems to me, never say ‘I’. And that’s not because they have trained themselves not to say ‘I’. They don’t think ‘I’. They think ‘we’; they think ‘team’. They understand their job to be to make the team function. They accept responsibility and don’t sidestep it, but ‘we’ gets the credit…. This is what creates trust, what enables you to get the task done.”

Wikipedia:  Peter Drucker

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, April 24, 2021 – Michelangelo

“A beautiful thing never gives so much pain as does failing to hear and see it.”

And

“Every block of stone has a statue inside it and it is the task of the sculptor to discover it.”

And

“Faith in oneself is the best and safest course.”

And

“Genius is eternal patience.”

And

“It is necessary to keep one’s compass in one’s eyes and not in the hand, for the hands execute, but the eye judges.”

And

“Lord, grant that I may always desire more than I can accomplish.”

And

“There is no greater harm than that of time wasted.”

And

“Yet I am learning.”

And

“If you knew how much work went into it, you would not call it genius.”

And

“The promises of this world are, for the most part, vain phantoms; and to confide in one’s self, and become something of worth and value is the best and safest course.”

And

“What do you despise? By this you are truly known.”

Wikipedia:  Michelangelo

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, April 23, 2021 – Socrates

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”

And

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us.”

And

“Let him that would move the world first move himself.”

And

“It is not living that matters, but living rightly.”

And

“He is a man of courage who does not run away, but remains at his post and fights against the enemy.”

And

“By all means, marry. If you get a good wife, you’ll become happy; if you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher.”

And

“He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.”

And

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”

And

“Be slow to fall into friendship; but when thou art in, continue firm and constant.”

And

“Not life, but good life, is to be chiefly valued.”

And

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.”

And

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.”

And

“If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality.”

And

“Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty.”

And

“The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new.”

And

“I shall never cease from the practice and teaching of philosophy, exhorting anyone whom I meet after my manner, and convincing him, saying: O my friend, why do you who are a citizen of the great and mighty and wise city of Athens, care so much about laying up the greatest amount of money and honor and reputation, and so little about wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul, which you never regard or heed at all? Are you not ashamed of this? And if the person with whom I an arguing says: Yes, but I do care: I do not depart or let him go at once; I interrogate and examine and cross-examine him, and if I think that he has no virtue, but only says that he has, I reproach him with overvaluing the greater, and undervaluing the less. …For this is the command of God, as I would have you know…”

And

“You will know that the divine is so great and of such a nature that it sees and hears everything at once, is present everywhere, and is concerned with everything.”

And

“I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world.”

And

“Bad men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good men eat and drink that they may live.”

And

“Often when looking at a mass of things for sale, he would say to himself, ‘How many things I have no need of!””

And

“There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance.”

And

“I would rather die having spoken in my manner, than speak in your manner and live.  For neither in war nor yet in law ought any man use every way of escaping death.  For often in battle there is no doubt that if a man will throw away his arms, and fall on his knees before his pursuers, he may escape death, if a man is willing to say or do anything.  The difficulty, my friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding unrighteousness; for that runs deeper than death.”  

Wikipedia Page:   Socrates

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, April 22, 2021 – Marcus Aurelius

“A man should be upright, not be kept upright.”

And

“A man’s worth is no greater than his ambitions.”

And

“Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart.”

And

“Be content with what you are, and wish not change; nor dread your last day, nor long for it.”

And

“Because your own strength is unequal to the task, do not assume that it is beyond the powers of man; but if anything is within the powers and province of man, believe that it is within your own compass also.”

And

“Dig within. Within is the wellspring of Good; and it is always ready to bubble up, if you just dig.”

And

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”

And

“If it is not right do not do it; if it is not true do not say it.”

And

“It is not death that a man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.”

And

“Let men see, let them know, a real man, who lives as he was meant to live.”

And

“Life is neither good or evil, but only a place for good and evil.”

And

“Look back over the past, with its changing empires that rose and fell, and you can foresee the future, too.”

And

“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.”

And

“Nothing has such power to broaden the mind as the ability to investigate systematically and truly all that comes under thy observation in life.”

And

“Observe constantly that all things take place by change, and accustom thyself to consider that the nature of the Universe loves nothing so much as to change the things which are, and to make new things like them.”

And

“The secret of all victory lies in the organization of the non-obvious.”

And

“Tomorrow is nothing, today is too late; the good lived yesterday.”

And

“Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.”

And

“When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive – to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love.”

And

“Remember that man lives only in the present, in this fleeting instant; all the rest of his life is either past and gone, or not yet revealed.”

And

“At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: “I am called to man’s labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?”

And

“Everything–a horse, a vine–is created for some duty…For what task, then, were you yourself created? A man’s true delight is to do the things he was made for.”

Wikipedia: Marcus Aurelius

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, April 21, 2021 – Thomas Paine

A thing moderately good is not so good as it ought to be. Moderation in temper is always a virtue; but moderation in principle is always a vice.

And

“Character is much easier kept than recovered.”

And

“Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.”

And

“I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.”

And

“I prefer peace. But if trouble must come, let it come in my time, so that my children can live in peace.”

And

“One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.”

And

“Society in every state is a blessing, but government, even in its best stage, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.”

And

“That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly.”

And

“There are two distinct classes of what are called thoughts: those that we produce in ourselves by reflection and the act of thinking and those that bolt into the mind of their own accord.”

And

“These are the times that try men’s souls.”

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“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom must, like men, undergo the fatigue of supporting it.”

And

“We have it in our power to begin the world over again.”

And

“We have every opportunity and every encouragement before us, to form the noblest purest constitution on the face of the earth. We have it in our power to begin the world over again. A situation, similar to the present, hath not happened since the days of Noah until now. The birthday of a new world is at hand, and a race of men, perhaps as numerous as all Europe contains, are to receive their portion of freedom from the event of a few months.” Common Sense, 1776

And

“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“It matters not where you live, or what rank of life you hold, the evil or the blessing will reach you all. The far and the near, the home counties and the back, the rich and the poor, will suffer or rejoice alike. The heart that feels not now is dead; the blood of his children will curse his cowardice, who shrinks back at a time when a little might have saved the whole, and made them happy. I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. ‘Tis the business of little minds to shrink; but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.” The American Crisis, 1776

And

“The circumstances of the world are continually changing, and the opinions of man change also; and as government is for the living, and not for the dead, it is the living only that has any right in it.” The Rights of Man, 1791

And

“It is the nature and intention of a constitution to prevent governing by party, by establishing a common principle that shall limit and control the power and impulse of party, and that says to all parties, thus far shalt thou go and no further. But in the absence of a constitution, men look entirely to party; and instead of principle governing party, party governs principle.” First Principles of Government, 1795

And

“I never tire of reading Tom Paine.” Abraham Lincoln, as quoted in A Literary History of the American People, 1931

And

“I consider Paine our greatest political thinker. As we have not advanced, and perhaps never shall advance, beyond the Declaration and Constitution, so Paine has had no successors who extended his principles.” Thomas Alva Edison

Wikipedia: Thomas Paine

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, April 20, 2021 – Leonardo da Vinci

“Necessity is the mistress and guide of nature.”

And

“Every action needs to be prompted by a motive. To know and to will are two operations of the human mind. Discerning, judging, deliberating are acts of the human mind.”

And

“Experience, the interpreter between formative nature and the human race, teaches how that nature acts among mortals; and being constrained by necessity cannot act otherwise than as reason, which is its helm, requires her to act.”

And

“The acquisition of any knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good. For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known.”

And

“That is not riches, which may be lost; virtue is our true good and the true reward of its possessor. That cannot be lost; that never deserts us, but when life leaves us. As to property and external riches, hold them with trembling; they often leave their possessor in contempt, and mocked at for having lost them.”

And

“It is easier to contend with evil at the first than at the last.”

And

“He who walks straight rarely falls.”

And

“Men will seem to see new destructions in the sky. The flames that fall from it will seem to rise in it and to fly from it with terror. They will hear every kind of animals speak in human language. They will instantaneously run in person in various parts of the world, without motion. They will see the greatest splendour in the midst of darkness. O! marvel of the human race! What madness has led you thus! You will speak with animals of every species and they with you in human speech. You will see yourself fall from great heights without any harm and torrents will accompany you, and will mingle with their rapid course.”

And

“Men standing in opposite hemispheres will converse and deride each other and embrace each other, and understand each other’s language.”

And

“It vexes me greatly that having to earn my living has forced me to interrupt the work and to attend to small matters.”

And

“He who does not value life does not deserve it.”

And

“As a well-spent day brings happy sleep, so a life well spent brings happy death.”

And

“Beyond a doubt truth bears the same relation to falsehood as light to darkness.”

And

“He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast.”

And

“He who wishes to be rich in a day will be hanged in a year.”

And

“I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do.”

And

“I have offended God and mankind because my work didn’t reach the quality it should have.”

And

“Learning never exhausts the mind.”

And

“It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.”

And

“Necessity is the mistress and guardian of Nature.”

And

“The earth is not in the centre of the Sun’s orbit nor at the centre of the universe, but in the centre of its companion elements, and united with them. And any one standing on the moon, when it and the sun are both beneath us, would see this our earth and the element of water upon it just as we see the moon, and the earth would light it as it lights us.”

And

“The motive power is the cause of all life.”

And

“Every action needs to be prompted by a motive. To know and to will are two operations of the human mind. Discerning, judging, deliberating are acts of the human mind.”

And

“The acquisition of any knowledge is always of use to the intellect, because it may thus drive out useless things and retain the good. For nothing can be loved or hated unless it is first known.”

And

“He who thinks little, errs much.”

And

“It is easier to contend with evil at the first than at the last.”

And

“Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.”

And

“Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.”

And

“Wisdom is the daughter of experience.”

And

“Nature is full of infinite causes that have never occurred in experience.”

Wikipedia: Leonardo da Vinci

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, April 19, 2021 – Henry David Thoreau

“A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone.”

And

“A truly good book teaches me better than to read it. I must soon lay it down, and commence living on its hint. What I began by reading, I must finish by acting.”

And

“Do not be too moral. You may cheat yourself out of much life so. Aim above morality. Be not simply good; be good for something.”

And

“Could a greater miracle take place than for us to look through each other’s eyes for an instant?”

And

“Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.”

And

“Do not hire a man who does your work for money, but him who does it for love of it.”

And

“Do not worry if you have built your castles in the air. They are where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.”

And

“Dreams are the touchstones of our character.”

And

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.”

And

“How does it become a man to behave towards the American government today? I answer, that he cannot without disgrace be associated with it.”

And

“How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live.”

And

“I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavor.”

And

“If I knew for a certainty that a man was coming to my house with the conscious design of doing me good, I should run for my life.”

And

“If you would convince a man that he does wrong, do right. Men will believe what they see.”

And

“In the long run, men hit only what they aim at. Therefore, they had better aim at something high.”

And

“It is not enough to be busy. So are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?”

And

“Live your life, do your work, then take your hat.”

And

“Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after.”

And

“Our life is frittered away by detail… simplify, simplify.”

And

“Our truest life is when we are in dreams awake.”

And

“Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.”

And

“The greatest compliment that was ever paid me was when one asked me what I thought, and attended to my answer.”

And

“The law will never make a man free; it is men who have got to make the law free.”

And

“The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.”

And

“There is no value in life except what you choose to place upon it and no happiness in any place except what you bring to it yourself.”

And

“What is once well done is done forever.”

And

“What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compared to what lives within us.”

And

“When I hear music, I fear no danger. I am invulnerable. I see no foe. I am related to the earliest times, and to the latest.”

And

“The fate of the country does not depend on how you vote at the polls — the worst man is as strong as the best at that game; it does not depend on what kind of paper you drop into the ballot-box once a year, but on what kind of man you drop from your chamber into the street every morning.”

And

“I heartily accept the motto, “That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe — “That government is best which governs not at all”; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.”

And

“If a man walk in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer; but if he spends his whole day as a speculator, shearing off those woods and making earth bald before her time, he is esteemed an industrious and enterprising citizen. As if a town had no interest in its forests but to cut them down!”

And

“I wish to suggest that a man may be very industrious, and yet not spend his time well. There is no more fatal blunderer than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living. All great enterprises are self-supporting. The poet, for instance, must sustain his body by his poetry, as a steam planing-mill feeds its boilers with the shavings it makes. You must get your living by loving.”

And

“Do we call this the land of the free? What is it to be free from King George and continue the slaves of King Prejudice? What is it to be born free and not to live free? What is the value of any political freedom, but as a means to moral freedom? Is it a freedom to be slaves, or a freedom to be free, of which we boast? We are a nation of politicians, concerned about the outmost defences only of freedom. It is our children’s children who may perchance be really free.”

Wikipedia:  Henry David Thoreau

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, April 18, 2021 – William James

“A chain is no stronger than its weakest link, and life is after all a chain.”

And

“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

And

“Acceptance of what has happened is the first step to overcoming the consequences of any misfortune.”

And

“Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does.”

And

“Action may not bring happiness but there is no happiness without action.”

And

“An idea, to be suggestive, must come to the individual with the force of revelation.”

And

“Belief creates the actual fact.”

And

“Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

And

“Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing.”

And

“Compared to what we ought to be, we are half awake.”

And

“Could the young but realize how soon they will become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.”

And

“Do something everyday for no other reason than you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test.”

And

“Every man who possibly can should force himself to a holiday of a full month in a year, whether he feels like taking it or not.”

And

“Everybody should do at least two things each day that he hates to do, just for practice.”

And

“Faith means belief in something concerning which doubt is theoretically possible.”

And

“Genius… means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way.”

And

“How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure.”

And

“Human beings can alter their lives by altering their attitudes of mind.”

And

“I don’t sing because I’m happy; I’m happy because I sing.”

And

“If merely ‘feeling good’ could decide, drunkenness would be the supremely valid human experience.”

And

“If you care enough for a result, you will most certainly attain it.”

And

“If you want a quality, act as if you already had it.”

And

“Is life worth living? It all depends on the liver.”

And

“It is only by risking our persons from one hour to another that we live at all. And often enough our faith beforehand in an uncertified result is the only thing that makes the result come true.”

And

“Most people never run far enough on their first wind to find out they’ve got a second.”

And

“The aim of a college education is to teach you to know a good man when you see one.”

And

“The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.”

And

“The best argument I know for an immortal life is the existence of a man who deserves one.”

And

“The deepest principle in human nature is the craving to be appreciated.”

And

“The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.”

And

“The world is all the richer for having a devil in it, so long as we keep our foot upon his neck.”

And

“These then are my last words to you. Be not afraid of life. Believe that life is worth living and your belief will help create the fact.”

And

“To change ones life: Start immediately. Do it flamboyantly.”

And

“We are all ready to be savage in some cause. The difference between a good man and a bad one is the choice of the cause.”

And

“We don’t laugh because we’re happy – we’re happy because we laugh.”

And

“Whenever you’re in conflict with someone, there is one factor that can make the difference between damaging your relationship and deepening it. That factor is “attitude.”

Wikipedia Page: William James

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