Tag Archive: Coaches Hot Seat

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, September 19, 2016 – Clint Eastwood

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“I don’t believe in pessimism. If something doesn’t come up the way you want, forge ahead. If you think it’s going to rain, it will.”

And

“I have a very strict gun control policy: if there’s a gun around, I want to be in control of it.”

And

“I’m interested in the fact that the less secure a man is, the more likely he is to have extreme prejudice.”

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“I’ve never met a genius. A genius to me is someone who does well at something he hates. Anybody can do well at something he loves – it’s just a question of finding the subject.”

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“Respect your efforts, respect yourself. Self-respect leads to self-discipline. When you have both firmly under your belt, that’s real power.”

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“Sometimes if you want to see a change for the better, you have to take things into your own hands.”

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“Go ahead, make my day”

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“I tried being reasonable, I didn’t like it.”

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“I would just like to say something, ladies and gentlemen. Something that I think is very important. It is that, you, we – we own this country. We – we own it. It is not you owning it, and not politicians owning it. Politicians are employees of ours.”

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“The less secure a man is, the more likely he is to have extreme prejudice.”

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“I’m not really conservative. I’m conservative on certain things. I believe in less government. I believe in fiscal responsibility and all those things that maybe Republicans used to believe in but don’t any more.”

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“You have to feel confident. If you don’t, then you’re going to be hesitant and defensive, and there’ll be a lot of things working against you.”

And

“I don’t believe in pessimism. If something doesn’t come up the way you want, forge ahead. If you think it’s going to rain, it will.”

And

“I’ve never met a genius. A genius to me is someone who does well at something he hates. Anybody can do well at something he loves – it’s just a question of finding the subject.”

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“I’ve taken advantage of a few breaks that came along and moved along with them.”

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“My old drama coach used to say, ‘Don’t just do something, stand there.’ Gary Cooper wasn’t afraid to do nothing.”

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“I was always respectful of people who were deeply religious because I always felt that if they gave themselves to it, then it had to be important to them. But if you can go through life without it, that’s OK, too. It’s whatever suits you.”

Wikipedia: Clint Eastwood

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, September 18, 2016 – LeRoy Neiman

 

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“I had a go at changing history – maybe not all by myself – I fought at the battle of Normandy, I slogged through the Ardennes, and I celebrated the liberation of Paris on the streets with beautiful French girls throwing flowers at me. I said good-bye to my first true love and discovered what I really wanted to do with my life.”

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‘Every time I started painting it was like a new experience, but they all came out the same.”

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“I hold doors open for all the women. Men can open the doors for themselves.”

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“Imagination comes of not having things.”

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“Boxing is my real passion. I can go to ballet, theatre, movies, or other sporting events… and nothing is like the fights to me. I’m excited by the visual beauty of it. A boxer can look so spectacular by doing a good job.”

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“I’ve met and sketched most of the great athletes from the past five decades and their movement, grace and energy have kept me captivated over the years. That’s what the ancient Greeks first saw and that’s what caught my interest.”

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“I always stayed in tune with my own ambitions and attitudes and I’m still my intractable old self, for better or worse.”

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“Eating is one of the great beauties in life. One of my favorite recreations… eating with friends, the service, the ambience.”

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“But ‘Playboy’ was liberating. I was drawn to it and went for it full throttle.”

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“I guess I created LeRoy Neiman. Nobody else told me how to do it. Well, I’m a believer in the theory that the artist is as important as his work.”

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“It’s a nice feeling to go out in the world and look for excellence – the best in man. My subject is very valid. It’s about people, and about life.”

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“I’ve got the public. I don’t care about the critics. I did at one time. I don’t any more. I did when I needed compliments. But if you get a lot of compliments, you don’t need a critic to tell you, ‘This should be done another way.'”

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“The businessman says ‘If I don’t do it first, somebody else will.’ The artist says ‘If I don’t do it first, nobody else will.'”

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“I can easily ignore my detractors and feel the people who respond favorably.”

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“It’s been fun. I’ve had a lucky life. Art has made me pull the best out of myself.”

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“I don’t know if I’m an impressionist or an expressionist. You can call me an American first… I’ve been labeled doing neimanism, so that’s what it is, I guess.”

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“I’ve zeroed in on what you would call action and excellence… Everybody who does anything to try to succeed has to give the best of themselves, and art has made me pull the best out of myself.”

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“The people who love my paintings, that respond to them the most, they’re spectators, they’re not viewers.”

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“I draw all the time. Drawing is my backbone. I don’t think a painter has to be able to draw, I just think that if you draw, you better draw well.”

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“I love the passion you go through while you’re creating.”

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“You can’t take yourself too seriously.”

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“No, I never had any dreams. The process of art is a dream in itself. The artist just doesn’t… you work out something. It’s yours. You don’t have to go to sleep to do that. You do that on the canvas.”

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“When I paint, I seriously consider the public presence of a person – the surface facade. I am less concerned with how people look when they wake up or how they act at home. A person’s public presence reflects his own efforts at image development.”

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“‘Playboy’ made the good life a reality for me and made it the subject matter of my paintings – not affluence and luxury as such, but joie de vivre itself.”

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“It has been difficult to hold onto many paintings but I have retained a few. Possibly the current favorite is titled ‘Big Band’ completed in 2005. It measures 13 feet x 9 feet. It has 18 nearly life size recognizable portraits of the biggest jazz stars that I knew and saw perform in the 1950s, ’60s, ’70s, ’80s and includes Wynton Marsalis.”

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“The most important thing is to just do it. If I work at a higher level I have responsibility to do better than what I’ve done before. Sometimes the best happens – beyond possibility. Just do it. Can’t worry about it.”

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“You know what I like about San Francisco? The women are beautiful, fashionable and smart. San Francisco is one of the only cities I like to visit. I love New York and Chicago – I studied there, and L.A. has the same people as New York.”

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“There’s no greatest moment in the arts. It’s a life, it’s a continuity thing. You can’t have a great moment because it’s spiritual. It’s a belief, it’s a calling. If you’re an artist, doing your own thing on your own, it’s while you’re doing it that counts. It’s a process. If you get too elated, you can get too depressed.”

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“The big shock of my life was Abstract Expressionism – Pollock, de Kooning, those guys. It changed my work. I was an academically trained student, and suddenly you could pour paint, smear it on, broom it on!”

Wikipedia: LeRoy Neiman

www.leroyneiman.com

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Saturday, September 17, 2016 – Omar Bradley

 

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“Bravery is the capacity to perform properly even when scared half to death.”

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“Leadership is intangible, and therefore no weapon ever designed can replace it.”

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“Set your course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.”

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“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”

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“Dependability, integrity, the characteristic of never knowingly doing anything wrong, that you would never cheat anyone, that you would give everybody a fair deal. Character is a sort of an all-inclusive thing. If a man has character, everyone has confidence in him. Soldiers must have confidence in their leader.”

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“We have men of science, too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. The world has achieved brilliance without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living. If we continue to develop our technology without wisdom or prudence, our servant may prove to be our executioner.”

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“Wars can be prevented just as surely as they can be provoked, and we who fail to prevent them, must share the guilt for the dead.”

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“The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.”

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“With the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents.”

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Military hero, courageous in battle, and gentle in spirit, friend of the common soldier, General of the Army, first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he embodies the best of the American military tradition with dignity, humanity, and honor. Gerald Ford, remarks upon presenting Bradley with the Presidential Medal of Freedom (10 January 1977)

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An Armistice Day Address

By General Omar N. Bradley
Boston, Massachusetts
November 10, 1948

“TOMORROW is our day of conscience. For although it is a monument to victory, it is also a symbol of failure. Just as it honors the dead, so must it humble the living.

Armistice Day is a constant reminder that we won a war and lost a peace.

It is both a tribute and an indictment: A tribute to the men who died that their neighbors might live without fear of aggression. An indictment of those who lived and forfeited their chance for peace.

Therefore, while Armistice Day is a day for pride, it is for pride in the achievements of others—humility in our own.

Neither remorse nor logic can hide the fact that our armistice ended in failure. Not until the armistice myth exploded in the blast of a Stuka bomb did we learn that the winning of wars does not in itself make peace. And not until Pearl Harbor did we learn that non-involvement in peace means certain involvement in war.
We paid grievously for those faults of the past in deaths, disaster, and dollars.

It was a penalty we knowingly chose to risk. We made the choice when we defaulted on our task in creating and safeguarding a peace.

It is no longer possible to shield ourselves with arms alone against the ordeal of attack. For modern war visits destruction on the victor and the vanquished alike. Our only complete assurance of surviving World War III is to halt it before it starts.

For that reason we clearly have no choice but to face the challenge of these strained times. To ignore the danger of aggression is simply to invite it. It must never again be said of the American people: Once more we won a war; once more we lost a peace. If we do we shall doom our children to a struggle that may take their lives.

ARMED forces can wage wars but they cannot make peace. For there is a wide chasm between war and peace—a chasm that can only be bridged by good will, discussion, compromise, and agreement. In 1945 while still bleeding from the wounds of aggression, the nations of this world met in San Francisco to build that span from war to peace. For three years—first hopefully, then guardedly, now fearfully—free nations have labored to complete that bridge. Yet again and again they have been obstructed by a nation whose ambitions thrive best on tension, whose leaders are scornful of peace except on their own impossible terms.

The unity with which we started that structure has been riddled by fear and suspicion. In place of agreement we are wrangling dangerously over the body of that very nation whose aggression had caused us to seek each other as allies and friends.

Only three years after our soldiers first clasped hands over the Elbe, this great wartime ally has spurned friendship with recrimination, it has clenched its fists and skulked in conspiracy behind it secretive borders.

As a result today we are neither at peace nor war. Instead we are engaged in this contest of tension, seeking agreement with those who disdain it, rearming, and struggling for peace.

Time can be for or against us.

It can be for us if diligence in our search for agreement equals the vigilance with which we prepare for a storm.

It can be against us if disillusionment weakens our faith in discussion—or if our vigilance corrodes while we wait.

Disillusionment is always the enemy of peace. And today—as after World War I —disillusionment can come from expecting too much, too easily, too soon. In our impatience we must never forget that fundamental differences have divided this world; they allow no swift, no cheap, no easy solutions.

While as a prudent people we must prepare ourselves to encounter what we may be unable to prevent, we nevertheless must never surrender ourselves to the certainty of that encounter.

For if we say there is no good in arguing with what must inevitably come, then we shall be left with no choice but to create a garrison state and empty our wealth into arms. The burden of long-term total preparedness for some indefinite but inevitable war could not help but crush the freedom we prize. It would leave the American people soft victims for bloodless aggression.

BOTH the East and the West today deprecate war. Yet because of its threatening gestures, its espousal of chaos, its secretive tactics, and its habits of force—one nation has caused the rest of the world to fear that it might recklessly resort to force rather that be blocked in its greater ambitions.

The American people have said both in their aid to Greece and in the reconstruction of Europe that any threat to freedom is a threat to our own lives. For we know that unless free peoples stand boldly and united against the forces of aggression, they may fall wretchedly, one by one, into the web of oppression.

It is fear of the brutal unprincipled use of force by reckless nations that might ignore the vast reserves of our defensive strength that has caused the American people to enlarge their air, naval, and ground arms.

Reluctant as we are to muster this costly strength, we must leave no chance for miscalculation in the mind of any aggressor.

Because in the United States it is the people who are sovereign, the Government is theirs to speak their voice and to voice their will, truthfully and without distortion.

We, the American people, can stand cleanly before the entire world and say plainly to any state:

“This Government will not assail you.

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressor.”

Since the origin of the American people, their chief trait has been the hatred of war. And yet these American people are ready to take up their arms against aggression and destroy if need be by their might any nation which would violate the peace of the world.

There can be no compromise with aggression anywhere in the world. For aggression multiplies—in rapid succession—disregard for the rights of man. Freedom when threatened anywhere is at once threatened everywhere.

NO MORE convincing an avowal of their peaceful intentions could have been made by the American people than by their offer to submit to United Nations the secret of the atom bomb. Our willingness to surrender this trump advantage that atomic energy might be used for the peaceful welfare of mankind splintered the contentions of those word-warmakers that our atom had been teamed with the dollar for imperialistic gain.

Yet because we asked adequate guarantees and freedom of world-wide inspection by the community of nations itself, our offer was declined and the atom has been recruited into this present contest of nerves. To those people who contend that secrecy and medieval sovereignty are more precious than a system of atomic control, I can only reply that it is a cheap price to pay for peace.

The atom bomb is far more than a military weapon. It may—as Bernard Baruch once said—contain the choice between the quick and the dead. We dare not forget that the advantage in atomic warfare lies with aggression and surprise. If we become engaged in an atom bomb race, we may simply lull ourselves to sleep behind an atomic stockpile. The way to win an atomic war is to make certain it never starts.

WITH the monstrous weapons man already has, humanity is in danger of being trapped in this world by its moral adolescents. Our knowledge of science has clearly outstripped our capacity to control it. We have many men of science; too few men of God. We have grasped the mystery of the atom and rejected the Sermon on the Mount. Man is stumbling blindly through a spiritual darkness while toying with the precarious secrets of life and death. The world has achieved brilliance without wisdom, power without conscience. Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants. We know more about war than we know about peace, more about killing than we know about living.

This is our twentieth century’s claim to distinction and to progress.

IN OUR concentration on the tactics of strength and resourcefulness which have been used in the contest for blockaded Berlin, we must not forget that we are also engaged in a long-range conflict of ideas. Democracy can withstand ideological attacks if democracy will provide earnestly and liberally for the welfare of its people. To defend democracy against attack, men must value freedom. And to value freedom they must benefit by it in happier and more secure lives for their wives and their children.

Throughout this period of tension in which we live, the American people must demonstrate conclusively to all other peoples of the world that democracy not only guarantees man’s human freedom but that it guarantees his economic dignity and progress as well. To practice freedom and make it work, we must cherish the individual; we must provide him the opportunities for reward and impress upon him the responsibilities a free man bears to the society in which he lives.”

Wikipedia Page: Omar Bradley

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Friday, September 16, 2016 – Peter Drucker

 

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“A manager is responsible for the application and performance of knowledge.”

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“Checking the results of a decision against its expectations shows executives what their strengths are, where they need to improve, and where they lack knowledge or information.”

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“Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results not attributes.”

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“Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.”

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“Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased constantly, or it vanishes.”

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“Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.”

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“People who don’t take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year. People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year.”

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“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.”

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“The only thing we know about the future is that it will be different.”

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“Time is the scarcest resource and unless it is managed nothing else can be managed.”

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“Unless commitment is made, there are only promises and hopes; but no plans.”

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“Management by objective works – if you know the objectives. Ninety percent of the time you don’t.”

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“Never mind your happiness; do your duty.”

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“The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

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“We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.”

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“Morale in an organization does not mean that “people get along together”; the test is performance not conformance.”

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“A man should never be appointed into a managerial position if his vision focuses on people’s weaknesses rather than on their strengths.” The Practice of Management (1954)

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“It does not matter whether the worker wants responsibility or not, …The enterprise must demand it of him.” The Practice of Management (1954)

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“The postwar [WWII] GI Bill of Rights–and the enthusiastic response to it on the part of America’s veterans–signaled the shift to the knowledge society. Future historians may consider it the most important event of the twentieth century. We are clearly in the midst of this transformation; indeed, if history is any guide, it will not be completed until 2010 or 2020. But already it has changed the political, economic and moral landscape of the world.” Managing in a Time of Great Change (1995)

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“Most discussions of decision making assume that only senior executives make decisions or that only senior executives’ decisions matter. This is a dangerous mistake.”

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“Never mind your happiness; do your duty.”

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“Rank does not confer privilege or give power. It imposes responsibility.”

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“Management by objective works – if you know the objectives. Ninety percent of the time you don’t.”

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“Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased constantly, or it vanishes.”

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“We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.”

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“No institution can possibly survive if it needs geniuses or supermen to manage it. It must be organized in such a way as to be able to get along under a leadership composed of average human beings.”

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“The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

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“Business, that’s easily defined – it’s other people’s money.”

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“Trying to predict the future is like trying to drive down a country road at night with no lights while looking out the back window.”

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“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.”

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“Making good decisions is a crucial skill at every level.”

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‘Today knowledge has power. It controls access to opportunity and advancement.”

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“Follow effective action with quiet reflection. From the quiet reflection will come even more effective action.”

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“The purpose of business is to create and keep a customer.”

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“The leaders who work most effectively, it seems to me, never say ‘I’. And that’s not because they have trained themselves not to say ‘I’. They don’t think ‘I’. They think ‘we’; they think ‘team’. They understand their job to be to make the team function. They accept responsibility and don’t sidestep it, but ‘we’ gets the credit…. This is what creates trust, what enables you to get the task done.”

Wikipedia:  Peter Drucker

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Thursday, September 15, 2016 – San Francisco

 

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“San Francisco is a mad city – inhabited for the most part by perfectly insane people whose women are of a remarkable beauty.” Rudyard Kipling

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“I hope I go to Heaven, and when I do, I’m going to do what every San Franciscan does when he gets there. He looks around and says, ‘It ain’t bad, but it ain’t San Francisco.'” Herb Caen

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“Anyone who doesn’t have a great time in San Francisco is pretty much dead to me.” Anthony Bourdain

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“A city is where you can sign a petition, boo the chief justice, fish off a pier, gaze at a hippopotamus, buy a flower at the corner, or get a good hamburger or a bad girl at 4 A.M. A city is where sirens make white streaks of sound in the sky and foghorns speak in dark grays. San Francisco is such a city.” Herb Caen

And

“San Francisco is gone. Nothing remains of it but memories.” Jack London

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“San Francisco has always been my favorite booing city. I don’t mean the people boo louder or longer, but there is a very special intimacy. When they boo you, you know they mean you. Music, that’s what it is to me. One time in Kezar Stadium they gave me a standing boo.” George Halas

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“I grew up in Marin County north of San Francisco, and in the 1950s and ’60s it was a natural paradise.” Huey Lewis

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“You know what I like about San Francisco? The women are beautiful, fashionable and smart. San Francisco is one of the only cities I like to visit. I love New York and Chicago – I studied there, and L.A. has the same people as New York.” LeRoy Neiman

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“You know what it is? San Francisco is a golden handcuff with the key thrown away.” John Steinbeck

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“San Franciscans are very proud of their city, and they should be. It’s the most beautiful place in the world.” Robert Redford

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“If you’re alive, you can’t be bored in San Francisco. If you’re not alive, San Francisco will bring you to life.” William Saroyan

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“San Francisco is 49 square miles surrounded by reality.” Paul Kantner

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“The ultimate (travel destination) for me would be one perfect day in San Francisco. It’s a perfect 72 degrees, clear, the sky bright blue. I’d start down at Fisherman’s Wharf with someone I really like and end with a romantic dinner and a ride over the Golden Gate Bridge. There’s no city like it anywhere. And, if I could be there with the girl of my dreams, that would be the ultimate.” Larry King

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“Leaving San Francisco is like saying goodbye to an old sweetheart. You want to linger as long as possible.” Walter Kronkite

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“What fetched me instantly (and thousands of other newcomers with me) was the subtle but unmistakeable sense of escape from the United States.” H.L. Mencken

And

“Every man should be allowed to love two cities, his own and San Francisco.” Gene Fowler

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“God took the beauty of the Bay of Naples, the Valley of the Nile, the Swiss Alps, the Hudson River Valley, rolled them into one and made San Francisco Bay.” Fiorello La Guardia

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“I don’t think San Francisco needs defending. I never meet anyone who doesn’t love the place, Americans or others.” Doris Lessing

And

” I don’t like San Francisco. I love it!” Dorothy Lamour

And

“I like the fog that creeps over the whole city every night about five, and the warm protective feeling it gives…and lights of San Francisco at night, the fog horn, the bay at dusk and the little flower stands where spring flowers appear before anywhere else in the country…But, most of all, I like the view of the ocean from the Cliff House.” Irene Dunne

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“We’re crazy about this city. First time we came here, we walked the streets all day – all over town – and nobody hassled us. People smiled, friendly-like, and we knew we could live here……Los Angeles? That’s just a big parking lot where you buy a hamburger for a trip to San Francisco……And the beautiful old houses and the strange light. We’ve never been in a city with light like this. We sit in our hotel room for hours, watching the fog come in, the light change.” John Lennon and Yoko Ono

And

“Cities are like gentlemen, they are born, not made. You are either a city, or you are not, size has nothing to do with it. I bet San Francisco was a city from the very first time it had a dozen settlers. New York is “Yokel”, but San Francisco is “City at Heart”.” Will Rogers

And

“San Francisco is one of the great cultural plateaus of the world — one of the really urbane communities in the United States — one of the truly cosmopolitan places and for many, many years, it always has had a warm welcome for human beings from all over the world.” Duke Ellington

And

“I have always been rather better treated in San Francisco than I actually deserved.” Mark Twain

And

“It’s an odd thing, but anyone who disappears is said to be seen in San Francisco. It must be a delightful city and possess all the attractions of the next world.” Oscar Wilde

And

“Money lives in New York. Power sits in Washington. Freedom sips Cappuccino in a sidewalk cafe in San Francisco.” Joe Flower

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“I’m proud to have been a Yankee. But I have found more happiness and contentment since I came back home to San Francisco than any man has a right to deserve. This is the friendliest city in the world.” Joe DiMaggio

And

“Chicago is the great American city, New York is one of the capitals of the world, and Los Angeles is a constellation of plastic; San Francisco is a lady” Norman Mailer,

And

“You wouldn’t think such a place as San Francisco could exist. The wonderful sunlight there, the hills, the great bridges, the Pacific at your shoes. Beautiful Chinatown. Every race in the world. The sardine fleets sailing out. The little cable-cars whizzing down The City hills~. And all the people are open and friendly.” Dylan Thomas

And

“The coldest winter I ever saw was the summer I spent in San Francisco.” Mark Twain

Wikipedia:  San Francisco

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Wednesday, September 14, 2016 – Norman Mailer

 

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“Every moment of one’s existence one is growing into more or retreating into less.  One is always living a little more or dying a little bit.”

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“Growth, in some curious way, I suspect, depends on being always in motion just a little bit, one way or another.”

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“I don’t think life is absurd. I think we are all here for a huge purpose.  I think we shrink from the immensity of the purpose we are here for.

And

“Masculinity is not something given to you, but something you gain.  And you gain it by winning small battles with honor.”

And

“There was that law of life, so cruel and so just, that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same.”

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“Ultimately a hero is a man who would argue with the gods, and so awakens devils to contest his vision.  The more a man can achieve, the more he may be certain that the devil will inhabit a part of his creation.”

And

“Somerset Maugham … wrote somewhere that “Nobody is any better than he ought to be.”… I carried it along with me as a working philosophy, but I suppose that finally I would have to take exception to the thought … or else the universe is just an elaborate clock.” The Deer Park, 1955

And

“The final purpose of art is to intensify, even, if necessary, to exacerbate, the moral consciousness of people.”

And

“Writing books is the closest men ever come to childbearing.”

And

“With the pride of an artist, you must blow against the walls of every power that exists, the small trumpet of your defiance.”

And

“His consolation in those hours when he was most uncharitable to himself is that taken at his very worst he was at least still worthy of being a character in a novel by Balzac, win one day, lose the next, and do it with boom! and baroque in the style.”

And

“There is no greater importance in all the world like knowing you are right and that the wave of the world is wrong, yet the wave crashes upon you

And

“New York is one of the capitals of the world and Los Angeles is a constellation of plastic, San Francisco is a lady, Boston has become Urban Renewal, Philadelphia and Baltimore and Washington blink like dull diamonds in the smog of Eastern Megalopolis, and New Orleans is unremarkable past the French Quarter. Detroit is a one-trade town, Pittsburgh has lost its golden triangle, St Louis has become the golden arch of the corporation, and nights in Kansas City close early. The oil depletion allowance makes Houston and Dallas naught but checkerboards for this sort of game. But Chicago is a great American city. Perhaps it is the last of the great American cities.”

And

“There are four stages to marriage. First there’s the affair, then there’s the marriage, then children, and finally the fourth stage, without which you cannot know a woman, the divorce.”

And

“We think of Marilyn who was every man’s love affair with America. Marilyn Monroe who was blonde and beautiful and had a sweet little rinky-dink of a voice and all the cleanliness of all the clean American backyards.”

And

“The highest prize in a world of men is the most beautiful woman available on your arm and living there in her heart loyal to you.”

And

“We sail across dominions barely seen, washed by the swells of time. We plow through fields of magnetism. Past and future come together on thunderheads and our dead hearts live with lightning in the wounds of the Gods.”

And

“I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one’s virtue, or one’s courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.”

And

“Obsession is the single most wasteful human activity, because with an obsession you keep coming back and back and back to the same question and never get an answer.”

And

“Booze, pot, too much sex, failure in one’s private life, too much attrition, too much recognition, too little recognition. Nearly everything in the scheme of things works to dull a first-rate talent. But the worst probably is cowardice.”

And

“There was that law of life so cruel and so just which demanded that one must grow or else pay more for remaining the same.”

And

“The sickness of our times for me has been just this damn thing that everything has been getting smaller and smaller and less and less important, that the romantic spirit has dried up, that there is no shame today…. We’re all getting so mean and small and petty and ridiculous, and we all live under the threat of extermination.”

And

“On a late-winter evening in 1983, while driving through fog along the Maine coast, recollections of old campfires began to drift into the March mist, and I thought of the Abnaki Indians of the Algonquin tribe who dwelt near Bangor a thousand years ago.”
Harry Hubbard, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“What if there are not only two nostrils, two eyes, two lobes, and so forth, but two psyches as well, and they are separately equipped? They go through life like Siamese twins inside one person…. They can be just a little different, like identical twins, or they can be vastly different, like good and evil.”
Kittredge Gardiner, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“I never saw love as luck, as that gift from the gods which put everything else in place, and allowed you to succeed. No, I saw love as reward. One could find it only after one’s virtue, or one’s courage, or self-sacrifice, or generosity, or loss, has succeeded in stirring the power of creation.”
Harry Hubbard, in Harlot’s Ghost : A Novel (1991)

And

“Booze, pot, too much sex, failure in one’s private life, too much attrition, too much recognition, too little recognition. Nearly everything in the scheme of things works to dull a first-rate talent. But the worst probably is cowardice.”

And

“There is one expanding horror in American life. It is that our long odyssey toward liberty, democracy and freedom-for-all may be achieved in such a way that utopia remains forever closed, and we live in freedom and hell, debased of style, not individual from one another, void of courage, our fear rationalized away.”

And

“We’ve got an agreeable, comfortable life here as Americans. But under it there’s a huge, free-floating anxiety. Our inner lives, our inner landscape is just like that sky out there — it’s full of smog. We really don’t know what we believe anymore, we’re nervous about everything.”

And

“Writing can wreck your body. You sit there on the chair hour after hour and sweat your guts out to get a few words.”

And

“Heaven and Hell make no sense if the majority of humans are a complex mixture of good and evil. There’s no reason to receive a reward if you’re 57/43—why sit around forever in an elevated version of Club Med? That’s almost impossible to contemplate.”

And

“If a person is not talented enough to be a novelist, not smart enough to be a lawyer, and his hands are too shaky to perform operations, he becomes a journalist.”

Wikipedia Page:  Norman Mailer

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Tuesday, September 13, 2016 – Thomas Edison

 

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“Be courageous. I have seen many depressions in business. Always America has emerged from these stronger and more prosperous. Be brave as your fathers before you. Have faith! Go forward!”

And

“Being busy does not always mean real work. The object of all work is production or accomplishment and to either of these ends there must be forethought, system, planning, intelligence, and honest purpose, as well as perspiration. Seeming to do is not doing.”

And

“Discontent is the first necessity of progress.”

And

“Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.”

And

“His genius he was quite content in one brief sentence to define; Of inspiration one percent, of perspiration, ninety nine.”

And

“One might think that the money value of an invention constitutes its reward to the man who loves his work. But… I continue to find my greatest pleasure, and so my reward, in the work that precedes what the world calls success.”

And

“I never did a day’s work in my life. It was all fun.”

And

“I never did anything by accident, nor did any of my inventions come by accident; they came by work.”

And

“If we did all the things we are capable of, we would literally astound ourselves.”

And

“It is astonishing what an effort it seems to be for many people to put their brains definitely and systematically to work.”

And

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

And

“Nearly every man who develops an idea works it up to the point where it looks impossible, and then he gets discouraged. That’s not the place to become discouraged.”

And

“The reason a lot of people do not recognize opportunity is because it usually goes around wearing overalls looking like hard work.”

And

“The three great essentials to achieve anything worth while are: Hard work, Stick-to-itiveness, and Common sense.”

And

“The value of an idea lies in the using of it.”

And

“There is no substitute for hard work.”

And

“There’s a way to do it better – find it.”

And

“What you are will show in what you do.”

And

“Your worth consists in what you are and not in what you have.”

And

“Anything that won’t sell, I don’t want to invent. Its sale is proof of utility, and utility is success.”

And

“I know this world is ruled by infinite intelligence. Everything that surrounds us- everything that exists – proves that there are infinite laws behind it. There can be no denying this fact. It is mathematical in its precision.”

And

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.”

And

“Restlessness is discontent and discontent is the first necessity of progress. Show me a thoroughly satisfied man and I will show you a failure.”

And

“During all those years of experimentation and research, I never once made a discovery. All my work was deductive, and the results I achieved were those of invention, pure and simple. I would construct a theory and work on its lines until I found it was untenable. Then it would be discarded at once and another theory evolved. This was the only possible way for me to work out the problem. … I speak without exaggeration when I say that I have constructed 3,000 different theories in connection with the electric light, each one of them reasonable and apparently likely to be true. Yet only in two cases did my experiments prove the truth of my theory. My chief difficulty was in constructing the carbon filament. . . . Every quarter of the globe was ransacked by my agents, and all sorts of the queerest materials used, until finally the shred of bamboo, now utilized by us, was settled upon.” On his years of research in developing the electric light bulb

And

“Everything comes to him who hustles while he waits.”

And

“If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill. The element that makes the bond good, makes the bill good, also. The difference between the bond and the bill is the bond lets money brokers collect twice the amount of the bond and an additional 20%, whereas the currency pays nobody but those who contribute directly in some useful way. … It is absurd to say our country can issue $30 million in bonds and not $30 million in currency. Both are promises to pay, but one promise fattens the usurers and the other helps the people.”

And

“I believe in the existence of a Supreme Intelligence pervading the Universe.”‘

And

“We don’t know a millionth of one percent about anything.”

And

“I find out what the world needs. Then, I go ahead and invent it.”

And

“I owe my success to the fact that I never had a clock in my workroom. Seventy-five of us worked twenty hours every day and slept only four hours — and thrived on it.”

Wikipedia: Thomas Edison

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Post Week 2 Coaches Hot Seat Rankings – 1 – 10 Hot Seat Head Coaches – These Coaches on the Hot Seat might not like it Mr. Cash…but Give Them Hell Anyway!

 

Post Week 2 Coaches Hot Seat Rankings – 1 – 10 Hot Seat Head Coaches

A chair on fire... metaphor "In The Hot Seat"

These Coaches on the Hot Seat might not like it Mr. Cash…but Give Them Hell Anyway!

Post Week 2 Coaches Hot Seat Rankings

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1.  Les Miles, LSU – When you have a quarterback that has played as much football as LSU QB Brandon Harris it’s the Height of Idiocy for that QB to have his head coach saying things like this about him…

“We’re trying to get Brandon comfortable and settled down,” Miles said, “but I don’t know if that will happen.”

….because reality is Les Miles…either Brandon Harris is by now…

Ready to Play Football or Not Ready to Play Football

…and any random teenager that is fan of the great game of football can see that…

Brandon Harris is just Flat-Out NOT Ready to Play Football!

We don’t have a clue if Purdue transfer QB Danny Etling is the answer to LSU’s offensive woes but we for Damn sure know…

There are at least three dozen 30, 40, and 50 something old former football players that are members at Coaches Hot Seat that are much older than LSU QB Brandon Harris who are right now BETTER quarterbacks than Brandon Harris will EVER be in college and with that in mind…

It’s time for Les Miles to ride Danny Etling to try and get his ass off the Hot Seat because if Brandon Harris is the LSU QB in 2016

….Les Miles will be working on TV in 2017 doing analyst work on games which isn’t a bad gig but for Damn sure it’s not the same as being the head coach of the….

LSU Tigers Football Team!

Can’t you just see Les Miles doing color on a football game on TV = “He really gave him his chest on that play!”

Yes…a win over a decent FCS team in Jacksonville State is nice but let’s not forget that in Les Miles last 20 football games against Power 5 Conference Teams he has a record of…

12 – 8

…and now over the next four weeks of the season Les Miles and LSU will get to play what is no doubt the most crucial stretch in Miles head coaching career against the following teams:

Mississippi State
At Auburn
Missouri
At Florida

The TRUTH is that if Les Miles loses just 2 of the next 4 games against the above teams the chances of Miles returning to coach at LSU in 2017 drop to around 10% because with 3 losses on the board with still games against..

A Pretty Good Southern Miss team
Ole Miss
Alabama
At Arkansas
South Alabama
At Texas A&M

….there is no way in Hell LSU loses fewer than FOUR games in 2016 and from what we have been told if LSU loses more than THREE games this season…

Les Miles is DONE in Baton Rouge

….and even THREE losses might lead to Miles firing come December if one of those losses to Alabama again.

Bottom-Line in the immediate future for Les Miles at LSU:

LSU CANNOT lose at home to Mississippi State on Saturday night….PERIOD!

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2.  Gus Malzahn, Auburn – As Gus Malzahn knows Arkansas State has a decent football program that has achieved a lot in recent years with a very small amount of resources especially compared to place like Auburn where Gus Malzahn has…

EVERYTHING HE NEEDS

….to win football games, SEC Conference Titles, and National Championships which brings us to the important numbers as it related to Gus Malzahn at Auburn.

Forget about Gus Malzahn’s first year at Auburn in 2013 which included just Total Fluke wins over both Georgia and Alabama which launched the Tigers into the National Title game and focus instead on the last three seasons…

2014 – 2016

….because the TREND is what is important for Malzahn and over the last three seasons Gus Malzahn’s records at Auburn now stand at:

Overall:  16 – 12

SEC:  6 – 10

Sorry….NO Coach can survive the above win-loss numbers at Auburn over even a short period of time with the amount of money that Auburn Athletics is spending on the Tigers football program which is really not an identifiable number since there is…

NOTHING

…that Gus Malzahn could ask for and not get which means that either Gus Malzahn performs in 2016 or there will be a new head coach of the Auburn Tigers come before the New Year.

Now at 1 – 1 on the season and Gus Malzahn needing from what we have been told in recent days…

“At least 8 wins to keep his job.”

….means that Malzahn and his Tigers will need to find 7 wins out of their remaining 10 games against:

Texas A&M
LSU
La. Monroe
At Mississippi State
Arkansas
At Ole Miss
Vanderbilt
At Georgia
Alabama A&M
At Alabama

Well…Auburn will certainly beat La. Monroe and Alabama A&M which gives Malzahn…

3 Wins

….which means the Tigers will need to win 5 of their remaining 8 games against…

Texas A&M
LSU
At Mississippi State
Arkansas
At Ole Miss
Vanderbilt
At Georgia
At Alabama

…and if you give Auburn a win over Vandy that is…4 wins against the below 7 teams…

Texas A&M
LSU
At Mississippi State
Arkansas
At Ole Miss
At Georgia
At Alabama

Hell…if Gus Malzahn and Auburn can’t win 4 games against the above 7 teams with the amount of resources and talent that Malzahn has access to then no doubt in our minds….

Gus Malzahn SHOULD be fired shortly after the Iron Bowl against Alabama in late November!

Do you think it’s important for Gus Malzahn and his Tigers to win the next 2 home games against Texas &M and LSU?

You Better Damn Believe Winning Those Two Games Is VERY Damn Important!

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3.  Mark Stoops, Kentucky – In his third year at Kentucky with Mark Stoops sitting on records of…

Overall:  12 – 26

SEC:  4 – 21

….and regardless of the size of Stoops buyout the margin of error is becoming smaller and smaller for Bob Stoops younger brother starting with a MUST WIN game against New Mexico State on Saturday in Lexington which with a loss would…

Effectively END the Mark Stoops Era at Kentucky

This is all very Damn simple for Mark Stoops….a defensive coach like Stoops just flat-out CANNOT give up…

44 points to Southern Miss
45 points to Florida

….and keep his job and with New Mexico State beating New Mexico this past weekend there could be a new name for “Waterloo” in the English language…

“Lexington” meaning when an era came to an end in America with this era being the Mark Stoops one at Kentucky!

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4.  Darrell Hazell, Purdue – Sorry…but in your FOURTH season at a Big Ten school like Purdue you should NOT be losing at home to a team like Cincinnati and with that loss to the Bearcats Darrell Hazell’s records with the Boilermakers drops to…

Overall:  7 – 31

Big Ten:  2 – 22

….and if the current trend continues one would think that Purdue will have a new head football coach come December.

Oh…a good way for Darrell Hazell to stop the “trend” would be for his football team to beat Nevada at home in their next game on September 24 before the Big Ten season gets underway!

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5.  Steve Addazio, Boston College – Steve Addazio’s Boston College football team HAD to beat UMass on Saturday and the Eagles got that win but then we are still talking about…

UMass

….which is about equal to beating a plate of cupcakes on any kitchen counter and that is why Addazio’s BC team needs to keep the ball rolling by beating Virginia Tech on Saturday in Blacksburg with what should be EASY WINS against Wagner and Buffalo looming in Weeks 4 and 5.

We finally got an old Boston friend of ours on the phone this past week and he did some asking around with his Boston College friends on what Addazio has to do to return for the 2017 season as head coach of the BC Eagles and his findings are:

“Win 7 football games….isn’t that pitiful?”

There you have it Steve Addazio…”win 7 football games” in your FOURTH season on the job and you will get a FIFTH season at BC!

As Jed Clampett used to tell Jethro….”Pitiful…Just Pitiful!”

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6.  Paul Haynes, Kent State – Paul Haynes Kent State football team lost to North Carolina A&T over the weekend in FOUR overtimes so give the Flashes props for playing hard but with that loss to NC A&T Paul Haynes records at Kent State dropped to…

Overall:  9 – 27

MAC:  6 – 17

….and remember Haynes took over a Flashes team that had won 11 games in 2012 under former KSU head coach Darrell Hazell!

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Hey…there’s a thought! When Darrell Hazell gets his ass fired by Purdue later this year he should come back and coach Kent State where he won 11 games in 2012!

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7.  Ron Turner, Florida International – Ron Turner’s FIU team lost to Maryland on Saturday…

Alert the Press…..NOT!

…and now in his FOURTH season as the head coach at FIU Ron Turner’s records now stand at:

Overall:  10 – 28

CUSA:  7 – 17

Forget Turn Out the Lights the Party’s Over…..this Ron Turner Party at FIU NEVER Got Started!

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8.  Will Muschamp, South Carolina – We watched most of the Mississippi State – South Carolina game last night when it was being replayed on one of the ESPN channels and if TRUTH be neither…

MSU or USC looked like very good football teams

….not that Will Muschamp really needs a very good football team in his first season in Columbia because what he needs is SIX wins to get his ass off the Hot Seat and with these games left…

East Carolina
At Kentucky
Texas A&M
Georgia
UMass
Tennessee
Missouri
At Florida
Western Carolina
At Clemson

….can Coach Boom find FIVE more wins among the remaining TEN games?

Well…let’s give USC the UMass and Western Carolina games which means Coach Boom needs THREE more wins out of the remaining EIGHT games…

Hell, if Will Muschamp can’t win THREE of EIGHT football games we will fly to Columbia in early December and fire his ass ourselves!

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9.  Clay Helton, USC – Someone at USC got the message that Clay Helton’s ass will be run out of Los Angeles if the Trojans don’t win a Helluva lot more than SIX games in 2016 and on Saturday USC played with a lot more focus against Utah State winning 45 – 7 and up next is…

Mighty Stanford on The Farm!

For those that follow Stanford Football closely as we do here at Coaches Hot Seat it is historical that Stanford is going for…

7 wins in the last 10 games against USC

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….on Saturday and even with the Trojans struggling it should be a Helluva football game because the Cardinal has a number of problems it needs to fix on both sides of the ball in what is clearly…

A MUST and DESPERATE TO WIN GAME for both Stanford and USC

….which is the kind of football game we love to watch and attend and no doubt there will be two dozen-plus from Coaches Hot Seat on The Farm on Saturday and with that mind…

Let’s Play some USC vs. Stanford Football!

As for Clay Helton the latest we have heard from our USC-alum friends in Los Angeles…

Anything LESS than 8 wins and USC is looking for a new head coach come December and that is straight from someone that could…

Buy and Sell most of Santa Monica this afternoon!

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10.  Kevin Sumlin, Texas A&M – Kevin Sumlin GOT the start he had to have to begin the 2016 season with wins over UCLA and Prairie View BUT what our A&M-alum family members and friends are watching is Sumlin’s record in SEC Conference play which in his FIFTH season on the job in College Station stands at…

17 – 15

….and the TRUTH is…

If Kevin Sumlin goes 4 – 4 or worse in SEC Conference play in 2016 he is DONE at Texas A&M…PERIOD.

Yes…the Auburn game on Saturday on The Plains is HUGE for both Gus Malzahn and Kevin Sumlin and that’s what makes the game so Damn delicious to those of us in the peanut gallery!

Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Monday, September 12, 2016 – Knute Rockne

 

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“A coach’s greatest asset is his sense of responsibility – the reliance placed on him by his players.”

And

“Build up your weaknesses until they become your strong points.”

And

“Drink the first. Sip the second slowly. Skip the third.”

And

“Four years of football are calculated to breed in the average man more of the ingredients of success in life than almost any academic course he takes.”

And

“It isn’t necessary to see a good tackle. You can hear it.”

And

“The essence of football is blocking, tackling, and execution based on timing, rhythm and deception.”

And

“The secret is to work less as individuals and more as a team. As a coach, I play not my eleven best, but my best eleven.”

And

“We count on winning. And if we lose, don’t beef. And the best way to prevent beefing is – don’t lose.”

And

“Show me a good and gracious loser and I’ll show you a failure.”

And

“One man practicing sportsmanship is far better than fifty preaching it.”

And

“The best thing I ever learned in life was that things have to be worked for. A lot of people seem to think there is some sort of magic in making a winning football team. There isn’t, but there’s plenty of work.”

And

“I’ve found that prayers work best when you have big players.”

And

“Win or lose, do it fairly.”

And

“Football is a game played with arms, legs and shoulders but mostly from the neck up”

And

“No star playing, just football.”

And

“Tell the public about the boys. They’re the ones that do the work and they should get the credit. The people are interested in them, not me.”

And

“Most men, when they think they are thinking, are merely rearranging their prejudices.”

And

“Let’s win one for the Gipper.”

Wikipedia:  Knute Rockne

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Coaches Hot Seat Quotes of the Day – Sunday, September 11, 2016 – Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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“Character is higher than intellect.”

And

“I cannot find language of sufficient energy to convey my sense of the sacredness of private integrity.”

And

“A little integrity is better than any career. “

And

“Every industrious man, in every lawful calling, is a useful man. And one principal reason why men are so often useless is that they neglect their own profession or calling, and divide and shift their attention among a multiplicity of objects and pursuits.”

And

“What you do thunders so loudly in my ears I cannot hear what you say.”

And

“To finish the moment, to find the journey’s end in every step of the road, to live the greatest number of good hours, is wisdom.”

And

“We are always getting ready to live but never living.”

And

“None of us will ever accomplish anything excellent or commanding except when he listens to this whisper which is heard by him alone.”

And

“To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men that is genius. “

And

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”

And

“Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood.”

And

“Whatever you do, you need courage. Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires some of the same courage that a soldier needs. Peace has its victories, but it takes brave men and women to win them.”

And

“The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.”

And

“Guard well your spare moments. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems in a useful life.”

And

“A chief event of life is the day in which we have encountered a mind that startled us.”

And

“A man is what he thinks about all day long.”

And

“As long as a man stands in his own way, everything seems to be in his way.”

And

“Character is higher than intellect. A great soul will be strong to live as well as think.”

And

“Enthusiasm is the mother of effort, and without it nothing great was ever achieved.”

And

“It was high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, ‘always do what you are afraid to do.”

And

“Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

And

“To be great is to be misunderstood.”

And

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”

And

“Trust men and they will be true to you; treat them greatly and they will show themselves great.”

And

“With the past, I have nothing to do; nor with the future. I live now.”

And

“If the colleges were better, if they … had the power of imparting valuable thought, creative principles, truths which become powers, thoughts which become talents, — if they could cause that a mind not profound should become profound, — we should all rush to their gates: instead of contriving inducements to draw students, you would need to set police at the gates to keep order in the in-rushing multitude.”

And

“Only the great generalizations survive. The sharp words of the Declaration of Independence, lampooned then and since as ‘glittering generalities,’ have turned out blazing ubiquities that will burn forever and ever.”

And

“To different minds, the same world is a hell, and a heaven.”

And

“Sometimes a scream is better than a thesis.”

And

“If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore, and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile.”

And

“The charming landscape which I saw this morning, is indubitably made up of some twenty or thirty farms. Miller owns this field, Locke that, and Manning the woodland beyond. But none of them owns the landscape. There is a property in the horizon which no man has but he whose eye can integrate all the parts, that is, the poet. This is the best part of these men’s farms, yet to this their warranty-deeds give no title. To speak truly, few adult persons can see nature. Most persons do not see the sun. At least they have a very superficial seeing. The sun illuminates only the eye of the man, but shines into the eye and the heart of the child. The lover of nature is he whose inward and outward senses are still truly adjusted to each other; who has retained the spirit of infancy even into the era of manhood. His intercourse with heaven and earth, becomes part of his daily food.”

And

“But genius looks forward: the eyes of men are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead: man hopes: genius creates.”

And

“There is a time in every man’s education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better for worse as his portion; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but though his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till.”

And

“Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members. Society is a joint-stock company, in which the members agree, for the better securing of his bread to each shareholder, to surrender the liberty and culture of the eater. The virtue in most request is conformity. Self-reliance is its aversion. It loves not realities and creators, but names and customs.”

And

“Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so.”

And

“Whoso would be a man, must be a nonconformist. He who would gather immortal palms must not be hindered by the name of goodness, but must explore if it be goodness. Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind. Absolve you to yourself, and you shall have the suffrage of the world.”

And

“Your genuine action will explain itself, and will explain your other genuine actions. Your conformity explains nothing. Act singly, and what you have already done singly will justify you now. Greatness appeals to the future. If I can be firm enough to-day to do right, and scorn eyes, I must have done so much right before as to defend me now. Be it how it will, do right now. Always scorn appearances, and you always may. The force of character is cumulative.”

And

“Hence, the less government we have, the better, — the fewer laws, and the less confided power. The antidote to this abuse of formal Government, is, the influence of private character, the growth of the Individual.”

And

“Money, which represents the prose of life, and which is hardly spoken of in parlors without an apology, is, in its effects and laws, as beautiful as roses.”

And

“The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.”

Wikipedia:  Ralph Waldo Emerson

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